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lamberts-lost-tooth
12-24-2006, 05:30 AM
NFL ought to shut off Thursday night lights because of roughness
By Mike Prisuta
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Sunday, December 24, 2006


Thursday Night Football is just such a miscalculation.
It goes beyond the inept play-by-play calling of Bryant Gumbel and the amateurish quality of the overall production.

It threatens the league's product integrity, something the NFL should be determined to protect at any and all cost.

Steelers coach Bill Cowher said it best prior to the Steelers' hosting the Cleveland Browns on Dec. 7 when he observed coaches weren't "consulted" about playing on Thursday nights, they were "consoled."

They'd never agree to such a thing, they'd be a unanimous 32-0 against had someone put playing on Thursday nights to a vote.

Coaches appreciate better than anyone how incredibly difficult it is to gameplan and prepare on a short week, particularly for the team that has to travel.

If they had their way, they'd never play at any time other than 1 p.m. Sunday.

They already view the occasional Monday night or late-season Saturday appearance as an inconvenience.

Thursday nights are above and beyond the call.

Thanksgiving is one thing.

That was a tradition that used to be exclusive to Detroit until Dallas decided it had to have its piece of the Thanksgiving action.

The third game added on Thanksgiving this year -- the NFL Network's debut in displaying, for the few who happen to be fortunate enough to have access, how not to televise the sport -- was unnecessary but understandable.

After all, what's Thanksgiving about if not gorging?

Thursday nights in the weeks thereafter are over the edge, particularly at a time of the season when the wear and tear of the game is beginning to impact individual and collective performance, and players need every minute of rest and rehab they can get.

Yes, they get extra time off the following week.

And yes, both teams must deal with a disruption of routine.

But that doesn't mean the quality of play doesn't also suffer.

The NFL is supposed to be about competitive balance.

Now, it risks not only its mission statement but also its ability to provide compelling, must-see TV.

Compelling TV drives the league.

An excess of something less isn't in the best interest of anyone involved.

Selling as much is as arrogant as it is ill-advised.

The NFL Network has its place as the league moves forward. It's perfect for the zealots who can't get enough of those Sunday morning pregame and analysis-type shows. The truly disturbed can also check out coaches' press conferences and scouting combine workouts. And there will always be an audience for condensed games and NFL Films archives.

But too much of anything is never a good thing.

In going to Thursday nights, the NFL has gone too far.

Preacher
12-25-2006, 10:00 PM
NFL ought to shut off Thursday night lights because of roughness
By Mike Prisuta
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Sunday, December 24, 2006


Thursday Night Football is just such a miscalculation.
It goes beyond the inept play-by-play calling of Bryant Gumbel and the amateurish quality of the overall production.

It threatens the league's product integrity, something the NFL should be determined to protect at any and all cost.

Steelers coach Bill Cowher said it best prior to the Steelers' hosting the Cleveland Browns on Dec. 7 when he observed coaches weren't "consulted" about playing on Thursday nights, they were "consoled."

They'd never agree to such a thing, they'd be a unanimous 32-0 against had someone put playing on Thursday nights to a vote.

Coaches appreciate better than anyone how incredibly difficult it is to gameplan and prepare on a short week, particularly for the team that has to travel.

If they had their way, they'd never play at any time other than 1 p.m. Sunday.

They already view the occasional Monday night or late-season Saturday appearance as an inconvenience.

Thursday nights are above and beyond the call.

Thanksgiving is one thing.

That was a tradition that used to be exclusive to Detroit until Dallas decided it had to have its piece of the Thanksgiving action.

The third game added on Thanksgiving this year -- the NFL Network's debut in displaying, for the few who happen to be fortunate enough to have access, how not to televise the sport -- was unnecessary but understandable.

After all, what's Thanksgiving about if not gorging?

Thursday nights in the weeks thereafter are over the edge, particularly at a time of the season when the wear and tear of the game is beginning to impact individual and collective performance, and players need every minute of rest and rehab they can get.

Yes, they get extra time off the following week.

And yes, both teams must deal with a disruption of routine.

But that doesn't mean the quality of play doesn't also suffer.

The NFL is supposed to be about competitive balance.

Now, it risks not only its mission statement but also its ability to provide compelling, must-see TV.

Compelling TV drives the league.

An excess of something less isn't in the best interest of anyone involved.

Selling as much is as arrogant as it is ill-advised.

The NFL Network has its place as the league moves forward. It's perfect for the zealots who can't get enough of those Sunday morning pregame and analysis-type shows. The truly disturbed can also check out coaches' press conferences and scouting combine workouts. And there will always be an audience for condensed games and NFL Films archives.

But too much of anything is never a good thing.

In going to Thursday nights, the NFL has gone too far.

The one thing this article did not anticipate... millions of dollars in advertising coming in for football being played on another night!