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Atlanta Dan
01-27-2007, 09:41 PM
The America's Game segments on best Super Bowl teams by NFL Network has hit the top SB teams, with the 1976 Raiders coming in at #10

The best analogy I can give as I am watching this program on the 76 Raiders is that Clint Eastwood released two movies in 2006 on the battle of Iwo Jima, one from the perspective of the Americans and one from the perspective of the Japanese. For a Steelers fan, watching this program on the 76 Raiders is like watching the Eastwood film on Iwo Jima that was told from the perspective of the Japanese, although I of couse am not saying the NFL is otherwise to be compared to the horror of actual warfare.

Aside from the fact that I had forgotten how Madden as a HC behaved on the sidelines like a mid-90s Cowher, the theme of this program is how the Raiders were obsessed with the Steelers, both in terms of arguing they were no dirtier than the Steelers (after the shot of Atkinson punching Swann in the back of the head, Villipiano and Stabler say the Steelers were dirty too as shots of Greene kicking a Brown in the crotch and Blount spiking Branch into the turf are played) and in needing to finally beat Pittsburgh to establish they also were a great team (which they were).

A very entertaining program that brings back memories of the incredible Steelers-Raiders rivalry of the '70s. As is said at one point in the program, "with the Steelers and Raiders it's not whether you win or lose, its whether you have Blue Cross."

Coming up Sunday night - the 2004 Pats at #9 - I guess some teams of the decade are regarded as better than others :)

1975 Steelers and 1978 Steelers programs yet to come.

sumo
01-27-2007, 10:32 PM
The America's Game segments on best Super Bowl teams by NFL Network has hit the top SB teams, with the 1976 Raiders coming in at #10

The best analogy I can give as I am watching this program on the 76 Raiders is that Clint Eastwood released two movies in 2006 on the battle of Iwo Jima, one from the perspective of the Americans and one from the perspective of the Japanese. For a Steelers fan, watching this program on the 76 Raiders is like watching the Eastwood film on Iwo Jima that was told from the perspective of the Japanese.

Aside from the fact that I had forgotten how Madden as a HC behaved on the sidelines like a mid-90s Cowher, the theme of this program is how the Raiders were obsessed with the Steelers, both in terms of arguing they were no dirtier than the Steelers (after the shot of Atkinson punching Swann in the back of the head, Villipiano and Stabler say the Steelers were dirty too as shots of Greene kicking a Brown in the crotch and Blount spiking Branch into the turf are played) and in needing to finally beat Pittsburgh to establish they also were a great team (which they were).

A very entertaining program that brings back memories of the incredible Steelers-Raiders rivalry of the '70s. As is said at one point in the program, "with the Steelers and Raiders it's not whether you win or lose, its whether you have Blue Cross."

Coming up Sunday night - the 2004 Pats at #9 - I guess some teams of the decade are regarded as better than others :)

1975 Steelers and 1978 Steelers programs yet to come.

I remember when both cheap shots occurred - 1976 - regular season game Raiders vs Steelers - early in the game, on a pass play - Bradshaws throws an incompletion and Swann is jogging back to the huddle - (I always thought it was Tatum - guess it was Atkinson) comes up behind him (play has been dead for a good two seconds) and plants a forearm right across the back of Swann's neck just under his helmet - knocking him unconscious - back then there wasn't the camera coverage we have now - but there was still a camera that caught everything and showed it over and over in slow motion - so later in the game as retribution, Branch cathces a short out pattern and Blount wraps him up - Branch won't go to the ground - so Blount lifts him off the ground drives him head first into the turf - small melee ensues and both benches almost clear - yep there was definetly bad blood back then - but it was this regular season game that led Noll to say in his weekly press conference "Jack Tatum is a criminal.."

silver & black
01-27-2007, 11:07 PM
Ah, yes... the good old days. That was football back then. None of the sissy, rules obsessed stuff that passes for football today. How many of todays players do you think could take the field with any of the Steelers or Raiders of the 70's without crying?

sumo
01-27-2007, 11:37 PM
Ah, yes... the good old days. That was football back then. None of the sissy, rules obsessed stuff that passes for football today. How many of todays players do you think could take the field with any of the Steelers or Raiders of the 70's without crying?

Yep - I still think the 70s was the best decade for the NFL - the talent level was high, teams stayed together longer, before the west coast offense, all the rule changes favoring more offense, etc - but there was an overall toughness to the game too - and you're right- most of the players today wouldn't be able to play in the 70s...

Elvis
01-28-2007, 07:43 AM
:tt02: I've always thought the Raiders were dirty, not that I dont think they are still dirty, but I have just watched that Steelers - Cowboys 35-31 matchup and those guys just play so much harder and try to hurt each other.. its crazy. That is the way football should be played I think. I guess that you just had to be dirty to survive sometimes right?:wave:

silver & black
01-28-2007, 08:58 AM
:tt02: I've always thought the Raiders were dirty, not that I dont think they are still dirty, but I have just watched that Steelers - Cowboys 35-31 matchup and those guys just play so much harder and try to hurt each other.. its crazy. That is the way football should be played I think. I guess that you just had to be dirty to survive sometimes right?:wave:

I suppose "dirty" is all in how you look at it. I'm not going to say that they weren't, but there were a lot of other player on other teams that did the same things. Deacon Jones comes to mind, as does Alex Karas and Jerry Kramer.

What the Raiders did back then was practice intimidation, and they made no secret of it. They told you exactly what they were going to do, and then dared you to do something about it. If you were brave enough to catch a pass over the middle, Tatum made sure you paid for it, and thought twice about doing it again.

Cheap shots were part of the game back then... they were leveled on other players by all teams, not just the Raiders... although the Raiders were very prolific at it, I'll agree. :smile: