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I-Want-Troy's-Hair
02-07-2007, 11:37 AM
What a sad story....

Part I

http://www.courant.com/sports/college/football/hc-lloyd0207.artfeb07,0,722296.story?coll=hc-headlines-collegefootball

UConn Recruit Rises Above Fear Of All-Pro Dad

He And His Mom Describe Abuse
February 7, 2007

He's one of 29 players expected to sign, but he's the only one with a former NFL All-Pro linebacker for a father.

Greg Lloyd Jr. isn't boasting about that. He hasn't talked to his father in four years.

And while today is a joyous day, Saturday is a worrisome day.

He will turn 18, and a protective order issued by a Georgia court banning his father from having contact with him will run out.

And that is unsettling to his mother.

"I can't protect him anymore," Rhonda Lloyd said. "That's a scary thought for me."

She says it's scary because Greg Lloyd's father was accused of sticking a gun in his son's mouth in 2001. Two trials in 2004 ended in hung juries and a third was not pursued.

Scary because Rhonda Lloyd's former husband was accused, and pleaded no contest in 2004, to simple battery for pointing a gun at his estranged wife's head in 2002.

Scary because of what Rhonda and Greg Jr. say they and a younger brother and sister went through living with Greg Lloyd Sr., a five-time Pro Bowl linebacker with the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 1990s.

Like most kids, Greg Jr. says he wanted a father who would see him become the football player that he is today. A father who would see him play college football. But not the father that he has.

"I'm living great without him in my life," Greg Jr. said. "I don't have to be scared every day. That's much better than the way I was living back when he was around."

He has not spoken to his father since 2002 and says he has no relationship with the man. According to press accounts of his testimony at the first trial, Greg Jr. said his father put the barrel of a Glock semiautomatic pistol in his mouth because he allegedly was upset about his 12-year-old son's grades in school.

"He was like, `You're wasting your life away and if you want to ruin it, I can end it for you right now," Greg Jr. said at the trial.

Accounts of the trials are based on reports from The Associated Press, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and The Citizen of Fayetteville, Ga.

Greg Lloyd Sr. testified at the first trial in Fayetteville, Ga., and denied the story. He did not testify at the second trial. At the time, his lawyer, Ricky Morris, said that "Greg maintains that this is basically Rhonda Lloyd's attempt to get an upper hand in the divorce."

Several attempts to reach Greg Sr. were unsuccessful, but Joaquin Bonilla, who co-owns two Oh Do Kwan martial arts studios in Georgia with Lloyd, says he sees another side of the former NFL player. A black belt in tae kwon do, Lloyd is listed as an instructor on the school's website

"He's a great role model to all the kids here," Bonilla said. "A lot of the allegations were fabricated. They tried him twice, and they never found him guilty. He's a good man. ... The things that went on didn't make any sense. You wouldn't believe how badly he wants to reconnect with those kids. His wife won't give him a chance. All this was so she could get what she wanted. She was making Greg out to be O.J. Simpson, and he's not. She's saying, `He's dangerous. He's going to kill us all.' What she did was a very planned-out strategy."

Greg Jr. says he thinks his father will attempt to contact him at some point. It's not something he wants.

"If he said he wanted to try again, I would say no," said Greg Jr., a 6-foot-2, 209-pound linebacker. "It's too late for that."

Greg Jr. is finishing his senior year at East Ridge High in Clermont, Fla. He plans to major in international business at UConn. He is ready for the future. His mother says he is a funny, intelligent kid who focuses much of his time on family life and his two younger siblings and likes to write. She says he has written a 400-page sci-fi novel.

"What happened, it's not something at this point I have any trouble dealing with," Greg Jr. said. "It's done and over. I guess I kind of get by not thinking about it. What good would it do?"

Drawn To UConn

Greg Jr. visited UConn in early December and went home impressed. He had other schools showing interest in him as a linebacker: Southern Mississippi, Kentucky, North Carolina, Alabama-Birmingham, Middle Tennessee and Central Florida.

He decided on UConn.

"What impressed me the most was the system they have set up for getting an education while playing football," Lloyd said. "I want to study international business, and it seems like a great place to do that being so close to New York and Boston. As far as the football goes, I was quite impressed with coach [Randy] Edsall, and the facilities just blew me away."

After two seasons playing defensive end, Lloyd established himself as a linebacker. He finished his senior season with a team-high 154 tackles, three sacks, three fumble recoveries and an interception.

"Everything Gregory has ever done has been based on him and his drive and his discipline and his love for the game," his mother said. "He just happens to have a father that was an awesome football player, so maybe some of it is genetics. I don't know. I think that people need to stop focusing so much on big Greg and focus on the accomplishments that Gregory's made. He's the one that got up and went to practice. He's the one that went out to lift the weights. He certainly didn't have his father to push him."

East Ridge coach Bud O'Hara said he was made aware of Greg Jr.'s situation when he came to play at the school.

"Greg is so mature, he's got his head on so straight that I never had to worry about him," O'Hara said. "I've got a lot more guys on my team that need me a lot more than he ever did, and that says a lot for his character after what he's been through. After I met his mom, though, it didn't take me long to realize where his strength came from."

I-Want-Troy's-Hair
02-07-2007, 11:38 AM
Difficult Transition

Greg Jr. speaks in abbreviated sentences when describing the abuse he says he and his mother sustained at the hands of his father.

"It started falling apart a long, long, long time ago, long before my parents got divorced," Greg Jr. said. "After they got divorced and I no longer had to wake up every morning and see him, it was like freedom. It was the way I wanted it to be."

In the 1990s Greg Lloyd Sr. was the embodiment of the black and gold of the Pittsburgh Steelers defense. He was considered small by NFL standards at outside linebacker - 6-2 and 228 pounds - but his play belied that.

According to Rhonda and Greg Jr., the fiery anger that Greg Lloyd Sr. used for motivation on the field was also a regular part of everyday life in the Lloyd household.

"He had his on and off days where he was a good person or he wasn't," Greg Jr. said. "But it pretty much went bad after he retired."

In 1991-95, Greg Lloyd Sr. made five Pro Bowl appearances and was recognized by many as one of the best outside linebackers in the NFL. He left the Steelers in 1997 after 11 years, then played one year for the Carolina Panthers before retiring after the 1998 season.

A 1997 Sports Illustrated story said Lloyd had four public run-ins with media members, flipping one off, cursing at another, threatening to "placekick" another and shoving one. A Sports Illustrated article in 1996 said he was ejected from a high school game for breaking the leg of an opposing quarterback, and his college coach at Fort Valley State said he had to be kept out of non-contact drills because "non-contact wasn't in his vocabulary."

Rhonda Lloyd said the deep roots of anger stemmed from her ex-husband's childhood.

In a 1996 Sports Illustrated story, Lloyd described the living conditions he dealt with as one of 10 children growing up in his aunt's two-bedroom apartment after being abandoned by his mother.

He said he wore the same pair of pants and shirt to school Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and the other outfit on Thursday and Friday.

"If you got anything dirty on Monday, you came to school with the same dirty clothes the next day," he told SI. "The other kids would say, 'You're stinky. You stink.' So that taught me humility."

He also was ready for a fight.

"Back then, all you had to say to me was `your mama,' and I was going to fight," he said.

Rhonda Lloyd said the physical and emotional abuse for her began not long after the couple married in 1988.

"Greg Sr., his whole life was built on rage," Rhonda Lloyd said. "It was all the rage of his childhood. ... There was this rage and hate that motivated him, and that's why he was awesome on the field, because that was where he got to hurt people. That's what his life was about, hurting people. He had a fascination with it, but in a crazy way; that's what made him such a great football player."

Suffering In Silence

Rhonda said she didn't know about the gun incident or some others with her son when she decided to leave her husband. She said around Christmas in 2002 he put a gun to her head and threatened to kill her. She took Greg Jr. and his sister Tiana, now 14, brother, Jhames, now 11, left the house and never went back. The next month she filed for divorce, moved with her children to Florida and her husband was charged with battery for threatening her with the gun. He entered the no-contest plea and was given probation and ordered to enter domestic violence counseling.

After filing for divorce, Rhonda placed all three of the children into counseling, during which Greg Jr. said his father had put a gun in his mouth. The counselor told Rhonda. She wasn't surprised her son had kept it from her.

"You wouldn't understand why he never said anything unless you've been in a situation like that," Rhonda said. "How could I live for 17 years and not tell people what I was going through? You can't understand unless you've been in it. It's a protection mechanism."

In March 2004, Lloyd went on trial for aggravated assault against his son. A mistrial was declared because of a hung jury. He went on trial again a week later, with a charge of aggravated stalking against his wife added to the assault charges against his son, and again the trial ended with a hung jury.

At the second trial, a girl who went to school with Greg Jr. said he once told her that his mother had urged him to "convince" the counselor that he wanted to live with his mother and not his father, according to a story in the Fayetteville Ga., paper, The Citizen. The story also said the judge ruled the girl's testimony inadmissible.

Rhonda said she agreed when prosecutors decided in May 2005 not to pursue a third trial.

"I didn't want Gregory to go through that again," Rhonda said. "To realize that he had to sit up there and look in his face again after what he had been through, I couldn't do that."

Rhonda is proud of how her son has handled his life.

"A lot of kids would probably have turned to drugs ... or whatever after going through what he went through," she said. "Gregory did the opposite. I really think that has to do with his relationship with God and his relationships with his sister and his brother and with me."

Rhonda's voice spikes with enthusiasm when talking about her son's decision to play football at UConn.

"I'm so excited for him," she said. "I'm so glad he's found the place where he wants to go to play football and get a great education. I think he made a great decision."

But it's an excitement laced with concern. She said Greg Jr. can't reapply for legal protection from his father because there have been no threats made against him since before her ex-husband went on trial.

"I'm still in fear. I fear for my children, and I fear for Gregory," Rhonda said. "But he's going to move on and live his life, and I'm coming to grips with the fact that I can't live in fear, which is why I can handle him going to Connecticut. Anywhere Gregory goes, his father could pop up, and that's just a fact of life. It's not a happy fact, but it's what we live with."

Big D
02-07-2007, 11:58 AM
this is a really sad story. Just goes to show you that just because someone can be an icon on the field they can be a nightmare off the field

tony hipchest
02-07-2007, 12:05 PM
what a story. i hope it turns into a great success story for greg jr. and hopefully he can reverse the cycle of abuse.

i hate reading that about one of my all time favorite steelers though, because what i liked so much was the rage and anger he played with. his tae kwon do experience gave him great leverage skills and burst at point of contact, and he definitely was one of the meanest, most intimidating players out there.

i remember his interview, where he talked about playing football as a kid. little johnies parents would be up the in the stands cheering their son. lloyd didnt have that, so all he wanted to do was rip the head off of little johnie to shut them up.

Big D
02-07-2007, 12:26 PM
very disappointing........

do you want to change your username yet?

coachspeak33
02-07-2007, 01:17 PM
Wow.... I dunno what to say.... Probably has something to do with Lloyd's absence from anything NFL related since the day he retired....

He is either guilty, ashamed, or both.

coachspeak33
02-07-2007, 01:18 PM
It sure hurts to hear though

memphissteelergirl
02-07-2007, 01:39 PM
I knew Lloyd could be a monster, but dag! That is very disappointing to hear. I hope Greg Sr. has learned to control his anger (it has obviously cost him a relationship with his children) and I hope Greg Jr. is on his way to a happy, successful life.

AvoidLLoyd95
02-08-2007, 06:19 AM
Maybe LLoyd Jr. can come to Pittsburgh and make his family name mean something good again. LLoyd will still always be my favorite linebacker, even though he may have been a maniacal tyrant at home. I don't know what to believe. I wasn't involved. I can't pass judgement on a subject I know little about.

Livinginthe past
02-08-2007, 06:32 AM
Sounds like Lloyd is a total a-hole, although that obviously helped with his on-field performance.

Maybe this is the type of thing the Bengals are looking to recreate now?

NM

Infamix
02-08-2007, 09:55 AM
I hope Greg Jr. plays for the Steelers in the future

Tim
02-08-2007, 09:59 AM
This is tragic, but not terribly surprising. I was never much of a Greg Lloyd fan.

I hope his son does well, he sure seems like he's got the right attitude.

Sith Lord
02-08-2007, 11:10 AM
"non-contact" wasn't in his vocabulary.

NJ Steeler36
02-08-2007, 11:32 AM
Here is an interview with Greg on 9/14/06. I read this several months ago while looking to see what happened to Greg after he retired. Very interesting article.


Greg Lloyd - Still Speaking His Mind

Khalil Garriott
NFLPLAYERS.COM
09/14/2006

Greg Lloyd - Still Speaking His Mind

Greg Lloyd walked into an autograph session in West Virginia last month, felt totally uncomfortable and wanted to leave.

He was supposed to come in that day and leave that day, but he's so far removed from football that he couldn't stand being there. Fans wanted to talk to him about the sport, but these days Lloyd has much more on his mind. And he isn't afraid to speak it.

"I don't really care [about football], that's the truth," Lloyd said. "I don't have a reason to turn on the game and watch it."

Nowadays, Lloyd is helping children develop the same kind of confidence he was famous for while striking fear in opposing offenses in the 1990s. He has a black belt in Tae Kwon Do and is an associate instructor at two martial arts schools in Georgia. Despite being the co-owner of both, he does not get a salary and enjoys taking a backseat to the Head Master.

A relentless and dynamic linebacker during his playing days, Lloyd is passing on the channeled aggression which befitted his reputation to students in his martial arts classes. In fact, his 18 years in martial arts far exceed his football longevity and it's his way of giving back to the community.

"I'm out of football and all that stuff, so I'm kind of in the back of the operation," said Lloyd, who has been considered a Master since 1999. "What I've been doing for 41 years of my life is work?I try to give that to the young ones. Don't let anybody change you?don't let peer pressure or your stupid friends change you.

"Martial arts is all about building character. You're going to have those same values for the rest of your life. We convince them that they're not only men of God, but they're worthy," he said.

For as much success as he had on the field, Lloyd has had his share of difficulties. Five times selected to the Pro Bowl, he was widely regarded as the NFL's premier linebacker during the 1990s and made three All-Pro teams. He showed the tenacity of a defensive lineman while flashing the speed of a cornerback. Beloved by Pittsburgh Steelers fans, he garnered the utmost respect around the league and could probably still deliver a few licks on opposing running backs.

But to say Lloyd was aloof toward the media and others as a player would be an understatement. Although he was never one to hold the press in the highest regard, Lloyd had no shortage of words and no problem opining about his take on the world with this writer. The man who used an expletive in a nationally-televised interview during the 1995 playoffs is a self-described "loner" who has also had some run-ins with the law. Regardless, everything in Lloyd's past is prologue to now, when he's as stern and outspoken as ever.

"I won't change?I say what I have to say regardless of who you are. If you talk down to me, then you're going to get it back in a negative way," Lloyd asserted. It's no surprise that he described himself as "immovable." "I stand out; I have a lot of discipline and a lot of morals. The world changes so much?it expects good people to succumb to all the bad things. I don't?I stand on my values as a black man raised as a black child. And I won't move on that."

As fierce a player he was for the Steelers and then the Carolina Panthers at the end of his career, Lloyd is quite the family man today. He makes his home in Fayetteville, Ga.?"one of the most racist little towns you could possibly be in"?where he prefers not to be recognized by the public. The flip side of choosing a low-profile life, Lloyd said, is the disrespect he endures on a regular basis as a black man in the South.

"You have to know who you are, and I am proud of who I am," he said. "You've got to have thick skin."

It's hard not to develop a tough exterior after experiencing what Lloyd said he witnesses on a daily basis. His wife, who is white, will often be approached immediately upon entering a store while Lloyd says he will go several minutes before being helped.

"I'm not going to change because you don't like the color of my skin," Lloyd said. "I don't change for anyone and I don't back down from anybody."

No kidding.

Lloyd doesn't hesitate when asked if he misses his playing days. "Absolutely not," he fired back. "No more schedules and I still hate running. I just [played football] because I was good at it."

A leader on and off the gridiron while with the Steelers, the "Sack Man" does think about his old teammates from time to time. He says the sole part of football that he misses is the locker room. "Grown men scared to come into the locker room because they're scared to be made fun of?that's what I miss," he admitted. "If you can survive years of playing football, you can do anything in life."

Throughout his life, Lloyd has been as diligent a worker as he was at pressuring the quarterback or dropping into coverage. With modest upbringings in childhood, he earned his career achievements and didn't inherit a single one. Today, he enjoys hunting, golfing and riding his Harley Davidson motorcycle. He also is completely devoted to God and uses that faith as inspiration and strength during family matters. The youngest of nine siblings, he has three children of his own, as well as two stepchildren.

"Football provided a way of life for me, and I'm thankful for that. But football doesn't own me," Lloyd said.

Since retiring from the NFL, Lloyd has become quite the country boy. He's had hunting property in Georgia for about nine years now and also likes to fish in his free time. He's quick to mention doing yard work and driving his Chevrolet Avalanche truck as his hobbies. He has gained a deeper perspective on life by praising God and reconnecting with his family when he does have downtime.

"I've spent so much time away from my kids and I like doing things I couldn't do when I was playing football," said Lloyd, now in his second marriage. "At the end of the day, that's who you want to come home to."

Lloyd had an unenviable start to his NFL career. Coming from a historically black college (Fort Valley State University), he said "guys kind of picked on me." A knee injury set him back during his first two years, when he was green-nosed and na?ve. But thanks to a strong work ethic and guidance from older players like "Mean Joe" Greene, he became a starter and made the Pro Bowl by his third year.

"I was a liability to the Steelers; I hadn't done anything [in the league] yet," Lloyd said of his humble NFL beginnings. "They were kind enough to keep me around."

The immovable Lloyd said his unwillingness to alter his playing style?and his personality?played a large role in his climb to the top of the NFL's elite defenders.

"I refused to change, and that's what makes you a good player. People might not like it, but they have to respect it."

Lloyd is quick to reveal that he "just kind of got out of football altogether." But that doesn't mean he doesn't notice how the NFL has changed since he last put on pads. As with everything, Lloyd has an opinion here, too.

He said, "I have a problem when I turn on the television and I hear the words 'great player.' There are not as many great players playing professional football today as there were in my era. These guys are great actors, not great players.

"Youth football is pure?it's not stained by money ? that's the part of football I like. The NFL is kind of married to all these different corporations and there's all this excess money now. For football players today, good and great is based on salary, not necessarily on performance."

Lloyd knows he was a favorite player and idol to many fans during his NFL days. He understands that. What he doesn't appreciate is the way some people act towards him, so he's trying to set the example.

"You kill ignorance with intelligence, and that's the only way to get past it," he said. "We've got to be better people; someone's got to be the better person. I had to go out and earn mine, so that's what I did and that's the same way I'm raising my [kids]."

Suffice it to say, you'd have a hard time catching Lloyd at another autograph session any time soon. He's lived his life his way, and he's very content with where it has taken him. He's been humbled by his experiences and wouldn't change a thing about his life.

"My concern is that when I have to stand before God on judgment day, will all my good outweigh my bad? Will I get permission to go on?" a reflective Lloyd asked himself.

More information on Lloyd's martial arts school, Oh Do Kwan Martial Arts, can be found at ohdokwan.com

nflplayers.com/news/news_release.aspx?id=5551

Indy_Steelers
02-08-2007, 11:38 AM
This is from a friend that has spent quite a bit of time with Lloyd.

I've interacted with Greg on several occasions and he actually even spoke of this to me and two other guys from the SC Mafia in the car. His ex was an extremely money hungry woman that realized she was about to lose her only chance of a meal ticket in life by being married to Greg. Honestly, his story made much more sense than hers, especially since it held no water in court. Greg just wanted it (meaning her) to go away basically. She has kept Greg Jr from Sr ever since and I'm sure pumped his head full of negative things about ole pappy. Just my two-cents on this subject. No one will dispute that celebs sometimes can manipulate courts, BUT celebs are easy targets. Either way, even if it WERE true, the kid apparently took a positive turn and I'm anxious to see what things are to come with his career. He looks just like Sr.

Livinginthe past
02-08-2007, 12:14 PM
I find it hard to believe his son faked having a gun put in his mouth - thats a little too extreme to be a plausible lie.

Seems like he has a large chip on his shoulder regarding his neighbours attitudes towards ethic minorities - is he that short of money that he can't move away from "one of the most racist little towns you could possibly be in" ?

NM

tony hipchest
02-08-2007, 01:56 PM
I find it hard to believe his son faked having a gun put in his mouth - thats a little too extreme to be a plausible lie.

Seems like he has a large chip on his shoulder regarding his neighbours attitudes towards ethic minorities - is he that short of money that he can't move away from "one of the most racist little towns you could possibly be in" ?

NMyeah, if the mom coerced him into that story you think eventually he would want to regain contact with his dad. sounds like he is fearful and wants nothing to do with greg sr.


doesnt sound like hes that short of money at all though. he went to college in the area, owns hunting property, and several businesses there. sounds like he likes it there and choses to stay. hes not the type of person to let racists run him off. "that which doesnt kill you will only make you stronger."

LambertLunatic
02-08-2007, 02:00 PM
I find it hard to believe his son faked having a gun put in his mouth - thats a little too extreme to be a plausible lie.

Obviously, the jury did find it hard to believe. I obviously wasn't at the trial, so I don't know why the son's testimony wasn't enough to convict Greg Sr. I do know that a 15 year old kid CAN be coerced into committing perjury by a custodial parent. My guess is that the jury questioned why this incident supposedly happened in 2001, yet at the time of the trial (2004) there was still no divorce. If it took 3 years to file for a divorce, then something smells fishy.

sumo
02-08-2007, 02:06 PM
You know the thing really really really pissing me off is the attitude of fans and media about superstars - a lot of professional athletes (hopefully not the majority) are pampered, arrogant, a**holes - and for some reason we have a problem separating their performance on the field from who they are and their personal lives - see Derrick "I have 8 kids by 7 different women" Thomas who had nothing set aside for his kids and ten closets full of designer clothing when he died.

We don't need to strain to portray these guys as great people just because they entertained us on the field ...I'm not perfect -nobody is, but you don't threaten your family with a freakin gun!!! and he has plead no contest to threatening his wife at the very least, so please spare me the racist - his son is lying-his wife just wants to get back at him-bulls**t - go grab a "GO OJ" sign and run along the freeway...

augustashark
02-08-2007, 02:56 PM
If he did what the article says he did, then screw him. He is no man!

I don't however want to convict a man of something I don't know is true. Two sides of any story, I know it's easy to say the kid would'nt lie, but there are a whole lot of cases out there that shows children can be manipulated by either parent.

Because he held a gun to his wife's head does'nt mean that he did put a gun in the mouth of his son.

sumo
02-08-2007, 03:14 PM
Because he held a gun to his wife's head does'nt mean that he did put a gun in the mouth of his son.

If a guy holds a gun to his wife's head (FOX sports reported back when all this went down originally, the only reason he plead no contest to this was because a whole lot more was going to come out in the media) - should he still be allowed to be in contact with his family?

I know (and I'm a white man) that I would not be allowed anywhere near my family in the community I live in if I put a gun to my wife's head...Shark, I know you're not implying that he should, but all the quotes in this article from the people who "know" him are definetly implying that he should be back in touch with his kids...

augustashark
02-08-2007, 03:40 PM
If a guy holds a gun to his wife's head (FOX sports reported back when all this went down originally, the only reason he plead no contest to this was because a whole lot more was going to come out in the media) - should he still be allowed to be in contact with his family?

I know (and I'm a white man) that I would not be allowed anywhere near my family in the community I live in if I put a gun to my wife's head...Shark, I know you're not implying that he should, but all the quotes in this article from the people who "know" him are definetly implying that he should be back in touch with his kids...

You're right I am not implyin that.

He was never found guilty (keep your OJ comments in a sack) of the gun in the son's mouth part.

Another interesting part of this story is that he is remarried. Most men that beat there wives are repeat offenders, I would like to hear what she has to say.

Elvis
02-08-2007, 04:32 PM
:blah: Just like OJ he is guilty and just had enough money and good lawyers to get him off.... Lloyd is a disgrace to the Steelers just like OJ is a disgrace to the Bills and the NFL...:helmet:

sumo
02-08-2007, 04:54 PM
You're right I am not implyin that.

He was never found guilty (keep your OJ comments in a sack) of the gun in the son's mouth part.

Another interesting part of this story is that he is remarried. Most men that beat there wives are repeat offenders, I would like to hear what she has to say.

I didn't say you were in the we love OJ crowd - I was making a point that some fans will excuse the inexcusable in an athlete based on how they performed during their professional sports career ....it had nothing to do with your post - I was genuinely interested in your opinion based on the article itself ...this is a sore subject with me - I did a significant research project on this subject in grad school - no offense was/or is intended...

sumo
02-08-2007, 07:03 PM
I am not saying Greg is guilty or innocent, I'm just saying that too much sounds awful fishy with the whole ex-wife thing for me to give this story much credibility.



Lloyd did admit to pointing a gun to his wife's head - via a plea bargain to keep other stuff from coming forward and to avoid jail time - so you may want to cut the ex-wife a little slack - yeah, he may not be guilty of putting a gun in his son's mouth ...anyway, this is a subject too close to me personally, so this will be my last post on this thread...

SqhillSteeler
02-08-2007, 09:11 PM
wow

NV STEELERS 723
02-08-2007, 09:50 PM
#95 and Kevin Greene were my favs ....they just meshed so well..... I was a Lloyd fan until I read about the way he treated his son....

I can't imagine doing that to my son ... EVER !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!

Greg Lloyd is a POS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

volkmire
02-08-2007, 10:06 PM
I am shocked and disappointed after hearing that.

BOXCAR JOEY
02-08-2007, 10:21 PM
its been said before but ill say it again.......Wowza!

NV STEELERS 723
02-09-2007, 12:22 AM
its been said before but ill say it again.......Wowza!

How bout instead of saying WOWZA,..... say "Greg Lloyd is a terrible Dad"....

rhino
02-09-2007, 12:38 AM
Wow.... I dunno what to say.... Probably has something to do with Lloyd's absence from anything NFL related since the day he retired....

He is either guilty, ashamed, or both.

Actually, I just saw Greg Lloyd today. I went to the NFL Skills Challenge here in Hawaii and he was playing in the NFL Legends flag football game. I thought it was ironic that Greg shows up and plays after I just hear about this crap. I was torn. I loved Greg Lloyd the player and wanted to cheer for him. But I'm also a father and would NEVER EVER consider anything like he did. He is basically a child abuser. I stand against that in all ways.

It was very very surreal to see him out there today. First, because nobody expected Greg Lloyd to be there and second because I JUST read these articles about him.

ThatGuy246
02-09-2007, 12:43 AM
I agree with all those who have noted that there are two sides to any argument. That said, I have to admit that I don't exactly have the utmost faith in Lloyd Sr.'s side. It's incredibly easy for a high-profile pro athelete to make the claim of, "Oh, she just wanted money and saw her meal ticket drying up."

Either way, I don't know what happened, and none of us do. But I did want to comment on one aspect of the very insightful Lloyd interview that is posted on Page 2 of this thread (thanks to whomever added it, though at the moment I forget the SN).

I've practiced martial arts since my earliest memories. I began when I was six years old, and at 22, I'm a 3rd degree Tae kwon do black belt and have been an instructor for both children and adults for six years now. My point is this: we don't teach people to "channel their aggression."

Yes, he said all the right things. But seriously, those in martial arts will tell you that respect is the utmost principle in ANY interaction. Whatever may have happened, I don't believe that Lloyd Sr. practiced the respect & self-control that is essential to being a leader in martial arts.

My only concern here is to remind the public that the people trying to master such arts aren't necessarily aggressive or abusive. We learn it to protect ourselves, to compete, and to have fun...not to provoke others.

Maybe unrelated, but I thought it was worth noting considering how often Lloyd has cited Tae kwon do in his defense. I don't know what the real story is, and ALL the best to his son in his football/professional career.

-Deej

PS: lol, I just lost a long edit. Anyway, I just wanted to clarify my comment about "channeling your aggression. Our primary objective is to ensure that no one is harmed as a byproduct of our training, unless it is ABSOLUTELY necessary.

If anyone has any questions or concerns as to martial arts training, please feel free to contact me.

rhino
02-09-2007, 12:53 AM
I agree with all those who have noted that there are two sides to any argument. That said, I have to admit that I don't exactly have the utmost faith in Lloyd Sr.'s side. It's incredibly easy for a high-profile pro athelete to make the claim of, "Oh, she just wanted money and saw her meal ticket drying up."

Either way, I don't know what happened, and none of us do. But I did want to comment on one aspect of the very insightful Lloyd interview that is posted on Page 2 of this thread (thanks to whomever added it, though at the moment I forget the SN).

I've practiced martial arts since my earliest memories. I began when I was six years old, and at 22, I'm a 3rd degree Tae kwon do black belt and have been an instructor for both children and adults for six years now. My point is this: we don't teach people to "channel their aggression."

Yes, he said all the right things. But seriously, those in martial arts will tell you that respect is the utmost principle in ANY interaction. Whatever may have happened, I don't believe that Lloyd Sr. practiced the respect & self-control that is essential to being a leader in martial arts.

My only concern here is to remind the public that the people trying to master such arts aren't necessarily aggressive or abusive. We learn it to protect ourselves, to compete, and to have fun...not to provoke others.

Maybe unrelated, but I thought it was worth noting considering how often Lloyd has cited Tae kwon do in his defense. I don't know what the real story is, and ALL the best to his son in his football/professional career.

I didn't read the whole thing. Did Lloyd actually say something to the effect that he blamed his agression toward his son on his Tae Kwon Do training - like he was just such a mean, lean Tae Kwon Do machine that he just couldn't help but do what he did? If so, that's weak.

At the very least, admit what you did, admit it was wrong, be sorry for it (if you actually are) and then do the best you can from then on. There is no way anyone will ever think Greg Lloyd is a "good guy" after this but he can and should do the right thing and take the lumps that come with being a horrible parent.

MACH1
02-09-2007, 01:10 AM
Man.....Thats sucks, he's one of my favorite all-time steelers. Disappointing

ThatGuy246
02-09-2007, 01:16 AM
I didn't read the whole thing. Did Lloyd actually say something to the effect that he blamed his agression toward his son on his Tae Kwon Do training - like he was just such a mean, lean Tae Kwon Do machine that he just couldn't help but do what he did? If so, that's weak.

At the very least, admit what you did, admit it was wrong, be sorry for it (if you actually are) and then do the best you can from then on. There is no way anyone will ever think Greg Lloyd is a "good guy" after this but he can and should do the right thing and take the lumps that come with being a horrible parent.

No, he absolutely did not blame it on any kind of pent-up aggression from his martial arts training.

Admittedly, I'm very sensitive to any such association, and felt compelled to chime in my very worthless two cents. That said, I just wanted to clarify that martial arts training is not necessarily an indicator of violent behavior...just something that's very near to my heart.

-Deej

Preacher
02-09-2007, 01:51 AM
This is a MAJOR assumption.... and I recognize that...

However...

The more I read his articles, etc... the more I hear a man that has serious issues. If he was sitting in my office, I would be very afraid for him and his family.

From what I read of his personal comments, would I be surprised if the claims are true? absolutely not.

And with that being the case... I don't want him EVER to associate with the Steeler team again.

Sorry, I know I am assuming... but I have all types of red flags going up from his own quotes.

1fastprototype
02-09-2007, 01:52 AM
I had a dealing with the Lloyd's in 1996. I sent money for a signed jersey from Greg through his wife. After nine months I started getting discouraged and felt ripped off.I sent letters and left messages, each one getting more persistant. Then I get a phone call from his wife tearing me a new ass, I tell her to forget it and just send my money back. Another month goes by and now I have there personal phone number and I call and leave a message of how dissappointed I am that I have had many idols dating back to 1971 and being close to many of the players.
The very next morning I get a call from Greg himself saying how sorry he was and never even new anything about my situation and that his wife doesn't handle things in the most professional way and he would be more than happy to make it up to me.

One week latter I recieved an actual game jersey with all the scuffs on it signed, A 9x12 picture signed personally to me, a hat signed, and a avoid the Llyoyd t-shirt signed all packed up with an appoligy letter.

Needless to say there are always two sides of a story and I will not pass judgement especially when three things come into play{ a women, money, and divorce}

Gregs jersey remains in my Steelers room in a glass shadow box next to Lamberts and Hams and across from Websters and Bradshaws. I am making my own all time great team of Steelers.

rhino
02-10-2007, 03:00 AM
I had a dealing with the Lloyd's in 1996. I sent money for a signed jersey from Greg through his wife. After nine months I started getting discouraged and felt ripped off.I sent letters and left messages, each one getting more persistant. Then I get a phone call from his wife tearing me a new ass, I tell her to forget it and just send my money back. Another month goes by and now I have there personal phone number and I call and leave a message of how dissappointed I am that I have had many idols dating back to 1971 and being close to many of the players.
The very next morning I get a call from Greg himself saying how sorry he was and never even new anything about my situation and that his wife doesn't handle things in the most professional way and he would be more than happy to make it up to me.

One week latter I recieved an actual game jersey with all the scuffs on it signed, A 9x12 picture signed personally to me, a hat signed, and a avoid the Llyoyd t-shirt signed all packed up with an appoligy letter.

Needless to say there are always two sides of a story and I will not pass judgement especially when three things come into play{ a women, money, and divorce}

Gregs jersey remains in my Steelers room in a glass shadow box next to Lamberts and Hams and across from Websters and Bradshaws. I am making my own all time great team of Steelers.

That's all well and good but remember this: Greg Lloyd pleaded NO CONTEST to holding that gun to his kid's head. For that, he paid some kind of legal price. When you plead no contest, that basically means you give up - you accept that you will be convicted of that crime but you don't want to admit you did it. Notice, Greg Lloyd did NOT plead innocent to the charge. If he "didn't do it", he probably would have. Wouldn't you?

If you still feel like Greg Lloyd is a nice guy because he sent you a box with some presents and an apology letter after he ripped you off for nine months then that's your choice. But seriously - the guy held a GUN to his KID's head. If that's the company you want to keep then that's the reputation you will assume as well - at least that's the lesson my grandfather always taught me and it has served me well.

jjpro11
02-10-2007, 03:46 AM
this is horrible.. he was the face of this team in the 90s. i hope he gets the proper help to deal with his anger management. when you stick a gun to two of your family members' heads, there is something psychiatrically wrong with you.