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View Full Version : Pittsburgh: A Modest, Quiet City?


Edman
06-09-2007, 10:15 PM
Let's face it, this city has been a long far cry from the Steel Empire days, and the population has dwindled and is dwndling slowly as we speak.

But I was born here, still live here, and I still love this town. My Mom moved me to Orlando in 1997 and moved back to PIT in 2002. I'm going to college here, so I doubt I'll be moving again anytime soon. I'm so proud that Pittsburgh was voted the most livable city recently, but the question is...will more people move here? We'll see...

SteelCityMan786
06-09-2007, 10:18 PM
Let's face it, this city has been a long far cry from the Steel Empire days, and the population has dwindled and is dwndling slowly as we speak.

But I was born here, still live here, and I still love this town. My Mom moved me to Orlando in 1997 and moved back to PIT in 2002. I'm going to college here, so I doubt I'll be moving again anytime soon. I'm so proud that Pittsburgh was voted the most livable city recently, but the question is...will more people move here? We'll see...

Maybe when the redevelopment is finished, we'll get more people.

83-Steelers-43
06-09-2007, 10:22 PM
As long as jobs are lacking this city will not grow.

Just a side note, when you have idiots on Mt. Washington complaining about concerts down on Station Square you can understand why some want to leave. This city is growing old with people who have nothing better to do than to complain about something or another. Small things such as that make it a city behind the times. That's just ONE example.

stlrtruck
06-09-2007, 10:22 PM
I moved from MD to FL. Not that I regret that move because it landed me a beautiful wife, 3 lovely children, and 2 dogs. However, before I moved to FL, I was trying my damndist (sp) to get a job in Da 'Burgh. I tried the Pirates, Penguins, and yes the Steelers. I even started making attempts at non-sports related jobs and couldn't get squat (must have been that fresh out of college thing - not sure). Pittsburgh will draw the people in because it's a beautiful city, with a lot to offer but from what I can tell of that town, it's not just going to be some guy that wants to move in - he's going to have to prove that he's worthy of living there.

I guess that's the difference between Pittsburgh and any other place I've lived. The people that live there, love it there. And I guess that's why I enjoy making plans to come back during the best season of all - football season!!!

SteelCityMan786
06-09-2007, 10:23 PM
As long as jobs are lacking this city will not grow.

That's every town.

my hometown of Hollidaysburg has been bring a lot business back into empty spaces of town towns and it looks like we may bust 6,000 for total population soon.

83-Steelers-43
06-09-2007, 10:25 PM
That's every town.

my hometown of Hollidaysburg has been bring a lot business back into empty spaces of town towns and it looks like we may bust 6,000 for total population soon.

When your a major city, it hurts. It's no secret that lack of jobs is hurting this city. There's a reason why kids come here to go to college and then leave ASAP.

Mistah_Q
06-10-2007, 03:59 PM
It's all in the type of job. The population loss is grinding to a halt -- yes it's still going, but it's ever so slow, and expected to soon be actually growing again. I've only been to the Burgh a handful of times (if you call 15 or 20 a handful) but from everything I've read, they're starting to have worker shortages -- but they're not the type of blue collar labor jobs that have historically represented the Burgh. Financial, corporate, white collar -- those kind of jobs abound. The work shortages are expected to continue to grow unless the city starts importing some people qualified for the jobs.

HometownGal
06-10-2007, 05:10 PM
Want job security in Pittsburgh? Become a lawyer - there are over 6,500 of those vampire bats in Allegheny County alone. :crazy01:

Pittsburgh is a great place to raise a family and the majority of the 40+ crowd who live here have lived here since birth. I think every major city is having problems with work shortages, but people find a way to make ends meet. At least we don't have a depression to deal with like my parents did - at least not yet.

83-Steelers-43
06-10-2007, 06:57 PM
It's all in the type of job. The population loss is grinding to a halt -- yes it's still going, but it's ever so slow, and expected to soon be actually growing again. I've only been to the Burgh a handful of times (if you call 15 or 20 a handful) but from everything I've read, they're starting to have worker shortages -- but they're not the type of blue collar labor jobs that have historically represented the Burgh. Financial, corporate, white collar -- those kind of jobs abound. The work shortages are expected to continue to grow unless the city starts importing some people qualified for the jobs.

Bingo. Like I said, it's a great laid back city for the most part. In a way that's great, in other ways it hurts this city. Eitherway, your seeing kids graduate, leave this city, get jobs elsewhere and then move back here once they are in their older years, that's even if they bother moving back here at all.

This city still has some work to do, moving out of the 70's and 80's would be a good start. Some in this city just don't want to let go.

X-Terminator
06-10-2007, 08:42 PM
Want job security in Pittsburgh? Become a lawyer - there are over 6,500 of those vampire bats in Allegheny County alone. :crazy01:

Pittsburgh is a great place to raise a family and the majority of the 40+ crowd who live here have lived here since birth. I think every major city is having problems with work shortages, but people find a way to make ends meet. At least we don't have a depression to deal with like my parents did - at least not yet.

Well, I can't say I'm surprised there are that many lawyers in the county, given that you can't spit and not hit one of their offices lol...

Pittsburgh and the region in general is a great place to live, but I really wish they would do more to market itself to the rest of the country and show them that it is a truly great place to live, work and raise a family. Many people I've encountered over the years still the city as a smoky, dirty steel town, and their opinion often changes when they see it for themselves and all that we have to offer. We didn't become the most livable city by accident, after all. I think if the city/county officials put some money and effort into promoting Pittsburgh and break the stereotypes, they would be able to attract more young people to move here and start to curb the worker shortage that Mistah_Q mentioned.