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View Full Version : New US dollar coin: The Americans don't know their Presidents


SteelersMongol
08-15-2007, 04:04 AM
US Mint to Release Jefferson Dollar Coin

WASHINGTON (AP) - Most folks can correctly name George Washington as the nation's first president. After that, things get tricky.

The U.S. Mint is hoping its new dollar coin series will help refresh some hazy memories of Adams, Jefferson and all the rest.

That could be a tall order, however, given the results of a poll the Mint commissioned to find out just how much knowledge Americans have about their presidents.

According to the telephone poll, conducted by the Gallup Organization last month, nearly all those questioned knew that Washington was the first president. However, only 30 percent could name Thomas Jefferson as the nation's third president, and memories of the other presidents and where they fit in was even more limited.

Mint Director Edmund Moy believes the new dollar coin series will be an antidote for that. And he can cite a good precedent. The Mint's 50-state quarter program, the most popular coin series in history, has gotten 150 million Americans involved in collecting the quarters that are honoring the states in the order they were admitted to the Union...

http://apnews.excite.com/article/20070815/D8R1AMF00.html

SteelersMongol
08-15-2007, 04:20 AM
What is the problem, folks? I mean we, Mongolians, don't have many Presidents to forget as the only third one is serving his term. But IMO, you guys are the some of the most patriotic people I'd have known.

For youth, it could be today's educational system, or lack of parents teachings, or this is how today's kids are like. But the Americans in general? Just curious.

Godfather
08-15-2007, 09:05 AM
Even if you learn all that stuff in school, you forget it over time.

When I was in college, the campus humor publication went to Boston for spring break and visited the Feredom Trail. They found a group of elementary school students who had no problem answering questions about American history.

Then they gound a group of high school students who didn't do so well. Who made the ride with Paul Revere? "Uh...his horse?" What was Crispus Attucks' profession? "Uh... he was black?"

Finally they found a drunk college student who didn't know squat.

I remember more American history than most, but I've forgotten other things. I remember very little chemistry and physics (but for some reason remember biology better), and I've forgotten a good bit of world history.

83-Steelers-43
08-15-2007, 09:13 AM
IMO, in honor of great American's such as Sean Penn and Danny Glover, the U.S. mint should introduce a Hugo Chavez coin. :coffee:

Jman
08-15-2007, 09:21 AM
IMO, in honor of great American's such as Sean Penn and Danny Glover, the U.S. mint should introduce a Hugo Chavez coin. :coffee:

:sofunny::sofunny:

RoethlisBURGHer
08-15-2007, 10:13 AM
The thing is, SteelersMongol, we are on our 43rd President of the United States in President Bush.

For just about everyone, memorizing every President is not important and something we won't need to know in everyday life. I cannot think of one time it will be important for me to know that.

It won't help me when I go to become a firefighter, it doesn't help me drive my car, it doesn't help me make more money.

See where I am coming from? We're patriotic, I love my country, but that is all trivial information.

Hammer67
08-15-2007, 10:49 AM
True...but there are people out there that don't even know who the president is now! Leno finds them weekly!

It is true, though, that we don't need to know everything taught in a High School civics class by heart, but we should at least understand the Bill fo Rights and know about the current branches of government.

Knowing all the presidents and their order is good for Jeapordy and that's about it.

PisnNapalm
08-15-2007, 10:50 AM
I disagree. I believe that if more Americans took an interest in their country's history we'd be a much stronger nation.

fansince'76
08-15-2007, 10:56 AM
Even if you learn all that stuff in school, you forget it over time.

Exactly. Unless you're a history teacher, or a museum curator or something along those lines, there simply isn't much call for a working adult to retain in their memory the names of presidents and where they fall in line sequentially.

tony hipchest
08-15-2007, 11:14 AM
how in the hell did we ever elect a guy named Grover?

"near........................faaaaar "

83-Steelers-43
08-15-2007, 11:21 AM
how in the hell did we ever elect a guy named Grover?

Blame the muppet party. They are the ones who pushed for that blue, fuzzy, red-nosed bastard.

Hammer67
08-15-2007, 11:30 AM
I disagree. I believe that if more Americans took an interest in their country's history we'd be a much stronger nation.


I am in total agreement, but in the grand scheme of our history and things that are most important. Remembering what number Millard Fillmore was is pretty far down the list of importance, me thinks.

And that's coming from someoen who minored in US history because of interest.

X-Terminator
08-15-2007, 11:36 AM
I disagree. I believe that if more Americans took an interest in their country's history we'd be a much stronger nation.

I can agree with that. Most of the garbage that the government/politicians sell us on a daily basis would never see the light of day if the populace was more educated and tuned in. They exploit this to a T, which is why politics nowadays are all about sound bites and talking points, rather than any kind of substance.

how in the hell did we ever elect a guy named Grover?

And twice at that??? :sofunny:

fansince'76
08-15-2007, 11:40 AM
Blame the muppet party. They are the ones who pushed for that blue, fuzzy, red-nosed bastard.

Don't blame me - I voted for Bill 'n' Opus.

http://bilancio.org/images/billpres.gifhttp://bilancio.org/images/opusveep.gif

:chuckle:

RoethlisBURGHer
08-15-2007, 12:25 PM
I disagree. I believe that if more Americans took an interest in their country's history we'd be a much stronger nation.

But how is knowing the Presidents in order from 1-43 going to make us a stronger nation?

I agree if more people took interest in the history of this country, it would be stronger. But somethings, like that above, would do nothing except win some games of trivial pursuit.

SteelersMongol
08-15-2007, 11:39 PM
What about remembering at least the first 5 or 10 presidents? I mean, especially the first 4 presidents who were the most important ones that shaped today's US?

Like I said we don't have many Presidents to forget than our Prime Ministers whose position was created since 1911, but I wouldn't be surprised to learn if we've got same problem when it comes to remembering the Prime Ministers. :sofunny: But I sure can remember the name of first 6 Mongol kings or khaans. :smile:

Crushzilla
08-15-2007, 11:45 PM
Off the top of my head...

Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Adams, Jackson, Van Buren, Harrison, Tyler, Polk, Taylor, Filmore, Pierce... someone... Lincoln... Carter?

The hardest my district... Hempfield... ever tried was teaching us a song in third grade... This is as much as I remember..

We remember the important ones. A lot of them fall through the cracks for doing very little to greatly alter the bigger picture...

tony hipchest
08-15-2007, 11:52 PM
What about remembering at least the first 5 or 10 presidents? I mean, especially the first 4 presidents who were the most important ones that shaped today's US?

Like I said we don't have many Presidents to forget than our Prime Ministers whose position was created since 1911, but I wouldn't be surprised to learn if we've got same problem when it comes to remembering the Prime Ministers. :sofunny: But I sure can remember the name of first 6 Mongol kings or khaans. :smile:

good questions Mongol. i leaned the presidents in the 1st grade. i was raised on an air force base and perhaps the curriculim is different in the average public schools cause i remember nothing else emphasizing knowing all the presidents when i entered civilian public schools.

my bigger question is why public schools dont teach our youth how to pay their own taxes after they turn 18 and get a job, or set up an IRA, or even how to invest in the stock market.

i would think having the foundation to financially succeed would be more important than being able to name 50 states and 43 presidents in less than 5 minutes. :hunch:

but then again, the rich wouldnt get richer if we tought our youth practical economics for free as opposed to mundane trivia.

thank God i know there are 9 planets in the solar system though...

oh wait...

poor pluto.

Crushzilla
08-15-2007, 11:58 PM
my bigger question is why public schools dont teach our youth how to pay their own taxes after they turn 18 and get a job, or set up an IRA, or even how to invest in the stock market.

When I was in high school, like 5 years ago :old:, they DID have a course which dealt with these things as an elective. I can't remember the name. Wait I just did. It was called "On Your Own."

A great idea, that was just getting going when I was graduating, but it should surely be made part of the core curriculum.

That or an alternative mathematics class that deals with real life application. I'm sorry, but logarithms are just bananas...

tony hipchest
08-16-2007, 12:15 AM
When I was in high school, like 5 years ago :old:, they DID have a course which dealt with these things as an elective. I can't remember the name. Wait I just did. It was called "On Your Own."

A great idea, that was just getting going when I was graduating, but it should surely be made part of the core curriculum.

That or an alternative mathematics class that deals with real life application. I'm sorry, but logarithms are just bananas...unfortunately schools are designed to turn out "working class" as opposed to the donald trumps or warren buffetts of the world. bill gates was smart enough to realize college was just a waste of his time.

its funny how schools will teach the functions for compounded interest in algebra without letting the kids know how it is actually applied.

i hated math because i always saw it as a mundane chore. of course i was always tought the formulas 1st without being taught what those formulas could be applied to in a real life setting.

i almost think the backwards form of teaching is a conspiracy to keep the majority in the "working class". our nation and capitalism wouldnt survive without it.

RoethlisBURGHer
08-16-2007, 12:37 AM
I hated math becaue I have never seen how I would need it in real life.

However, with me wanting to become a firefighter, I have been looking into stuff and I see where some of the algebra and geometry they taught me will come in.

If they would have explained this all to me back then, I would have cared more.

tony hipchest
08-16-2007, 12:45 AM
I hated math becaue I have never seen how I would need it in real life.

However, with me wanting to become a firefighter, I have been looking into stuff and I see where some of the algebra and geometry they taught me will come in.

If they would have explained this all to me back then, I would have cared more.

for sure. trigonometry or calculus didnt mean shit to me in school, caust, it was presented as a bunch of useless boring word problems combining letters and numbers. if they woulda taught what those letters were supposed to represent in real life, practical applications i wouldve understood and cared more.

like i said, we are taught backwards. if i was taught about space exploration in the 60's first and then how trig and cal made it all possible it woulda been easier to learn.

as it was, i was taught a bunch of letters, numbers, formulas, and left on my own to figure out when and where it was actually applied.

fansince'76
08-16-2007, 12:55 AM
I think another problem with the public education establishment beyond simply teaching concepts without explaining their applicability to real life is the fact that it is now just starting to catch on to the notion that not everyone learns the same way. For generations, they have literally forced the same cookie cutter learning model on every kid, while branding the kids that cannot learn effectively within that model as "dumb," which leads back to Tony's point of pigeonholing kids into the "working class."

RoethlisBURGHer
08-16-2007, 01:03 AM
I didn't get anything above a "D" in math until the 4th grade when I had a tutor. Once she couldn't tutor anymore, I was back to "F" and "D" until the 7th grade. In the 7th grade, I started to finally catch on.

Back then, if I got a "D", it was reason to be happy. Everything else was "A", "B", and sometimes a "C" except for my one year of catholic school where a "C" was 80%.

Preacher
08-16-2007, 05:49 AM
I didn't get anything above a "D" in math until the 4th grade when I had a tutor. Once she couldn't tutor anymore, I was back to "F" and "D" until the 7th grade. In the 7th grade, I started to finally catch on.

Back then, if I got a "D", it was reason to be happy. Everything else was "A", "B", and sometimes a "C" except for my one year of catholic school where a "C" was 80%.

Dang..

I graduated from highschool with a 1.95... and that was only because i had a few A's and B's my senior year.

I hated math. Got D's in it, a B one time in geometry, but failed the next semester. Then went to summer school. Went back the next semester and took Trig. Failed it and was done with math. Why? Cause I could have cared less about it.

Now? I find it interesting, but could still care less about the specifics.

Funny thing... the higher in my education I went, the better GPA I got. That is probably because each step became more specific, and held my attention that much more.

matt
08-17-2007, 11:07 AM
I think the problem is that many Americans are just the immigrants and are not really interested in the history of USA.