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Hammer67
08-30-2007, 10:46 AM
Ah…puppies.

My wife and I got a Choc. Lab puppy a few months ago (at 8 weeks). He is now 7 months old and we recently went from 3 meals a day down to two, morning and evening. Everything is great with our dog. He is growing and is at a healthy weight. We feed him the recommended cups for his size and breed and only use high end Nutro food.

So, we are having a discussion a number of months ago with my wife's sister. They have a Puggle. They would just free feed her (leave food out at all times) and said this is "less cruel". Needless to say, they ended up with a fat Puggle that is about 20 lbs over its healthy weight. She thinks our dog is skinny and that we should feed him more. LOL!

So, I guess this is an informal poll. How often do you feed your dog(s)?? I know this is totally dependant on breed and size. I know I can't just leave my Lab's bowl full at all times as he devours anything we give him and he would be fat in a matter of weeks.


Oh….and just discovered the absolute joys of a prong collar for training! Wow…what a difference it makes. We were against using a choke collar but the prong is humane and much easier!


Also...the dog crate is a housetraining godsend.

The Duke
08-30-2007, 02:59 PM
I left food all day out for my dog(RIP) and he never got fat or anything, and he didn't do much exercise. I think it depends on the kind of dog, mine was small and I'm not familiar with the race of yours so perhaps it's a dog that has to eat more or one of those dogs that eats as soon as they see food. Good luck with the dog

memphissteelergirl
08-30-2007, 03:42 PM
I hope to get a dog in the not-too-distant future, so I have doing a lot of research. From everything I have read, Hammer, you are doing the right thing.

steelersfanmx
08-30-2007, 04:02 PM
Labrador retrievers are amazing dogs, and they are always full of energy...!:thumbsup:
I have and adult black lab...(8 years old) and hi loves run and run and run in the forest!...LOL
I ve always feed him twice a day.. since he was a puppy.

He was overweight once, but due to some medication... now hes fine and eat as usual.. 2 meals...
and sometimes when hes alone, a let him a cup full of food...

I think you are doing right, but if your lab is an hyperactive dog ( as I think it should)
maybe you can feed him with high-proteine food, or asking to the vet, what
amount of food he needs, it can variate depending the level of activity of your dog..

But as I said, 2 meal a day is fine for a averages dog like labs or shepards.

Steelerstrength
08-30-2007, 04:11 PM
We've owned two Labs, and are now down to one 13 year old Wolf. (He's 86% Timber & 14% Malamute. We have this great geneology report) The labs will eat, and eat, and eat, if you let them. Our Lab Sparky, who passed away a year ago, became overweight, so we bought the Hills K/D because it's lower in protein & calories, but filling to the dog. Can & dry is available, for adult dogs. Our Labs also loved baby carrots for snacks! No shit!

No way would I ever recommend leaving food out for a Lab! :drool: Twice per day is perfect!

We've also been very fortunate in training our dogs. A strong Alpha-Male figure has worked very well for all commands. Especially with the 120 lbs. Wolf.

Never tried the crate training. I hear it works very well! We have always tied a small bell to their collar, and took them out every time they woke up. This lasted about two weeks, and they were trained not to go in the house. There were a few accidents along the way. :poop:

Please post a pic of your pup!?

MACH1
08-30-2007, 04:57 PM
Well, I have a 3 year old choc as you can see by my av.
He weighs 125lbs and I only feed him once a day at dinner time and he's not over weight. Twice a day should be fine in moderation but don't over do it. As stated above they'll eat till they bloat themselfs.:popcorn:
Just spend as much time with them as you can training them and make it fun for them, its goes faster. And if they act like they get tired or bored of what their doing just stop. Go back and start again a little later. Remember the key is to try and make learning for the dog as fun as possible for them. Keep it fun and the longer they stay interested. And yes I did us a collar in the beginning and depending on how smart your dog is, it shouldn't take long. I had one that would also make noise when you used on em and after a couple times all I had to use was the noise button.

MasterOfPuppets
08-30-2007, 05:08 PM
i say... let him gourge !!!! :toofunny:

MasterOfPuppets
08-30-2007, 05:10 PM
Well, I have a 3 year old choc as you can see by my av.
.

wow !!! i thought that was a freakin star wars character !!!! :sofunny:

MasterOfPuppets
08-30-2007, 05:17 PM
:toofunny:just look how happy this one is....
http://http://img337.imageshack.us/img337/2791/fatdogiy0.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Hammer67
08-30-2007, 06:56 PM
MasterofPuppets: No joke...that's close to how my Sis in law's dog got!!


But, I have researched more then I care to elaborate. I probably read the equivalent of two books on labs. And, talked to countless lab owners and different vets.
One thing I am amazed at is how uninformed some people are who own dogs.

We have him going to a great obedience school (3rd week out of 8) and I had him trained to sit, lie down and stay early on. Crate training is the greatest as it house trains them in a matter of days. You just have to be careful and gradually get them accustomed to it. It becomes their kennel and they end up spending free time in there when you are home and the cage door is open. We were leaving him in during the day as both my wife and I work weekdays. She would come home at lunch to feed him and let him out. Now that he is going on 8 months, we leave him the entire workday. Not one accident in the crate.

He used to sleep in it at night but now he is so well behaved that he sleeps either under our bed or on it. We don't worry about chewing things like cords and furniture...he has enough toys that he knows is his.

I totally recommend researching the type of dog you want before you buy. Get a crate to make your life easier (especially if you don't have a fenced in yard to let them roam free in.

Plus, our trainer just showed us a prong collar. His only behavioral issue was pulling on the leash. I could control him but he is pushing 50lbs now and the wife can't handle him. So, we got the prong. it basically simulates the mother nipping at their neck skin. It doesn't choke them, it lightly pinches the skin if they pull. So, he ends up walking so nicely at our side now. What a great invention. he no longer tries to choke himself by dragging us!

Here he is:
http://picasaweb.google.com/rcreely/Guinness02?authkey=z_gJ3OFYlnU

MACH1
08-30-2007, 07:20 PM
Nice lookin dog.

If he's like mine get him a little kiddie pool, he'll love it in the summer time.
Good luck keeping him out of the water when you don't want him in, like when your trying to fish. :sofunny:

Steelerstrength
08-30-2007, 10:23 PM
MasterofPuppets: No joke...that's close to how my Sis in law's dog got!!


But, I have researched more then I care to elaborate. I probably read the equivalent of two books on labs. And, talked to countless lab owners and different vets.
One thing I am amazed at is how uninformed some people are who own dogs.

We have him going to a great obedience school (3rd week out of 8) and I had him trained to sit, lie down and stay early on. Crate training is the greatest as it house trains them in a matter of days. You just have to be careful and gradually get them accustomed to it. It becomes their kennel and they end up spending free time in there when you are home and the cage door is open. We were leaving him in during the day as both my wife and I work weekdays. She would come home at lunch to feed him and let him out. Now that he is going on 8 months, we leave him the entire workday. Not one accident in the crate.

He used to sleep in it at night but now he is so well behaved that he sleeps either under our bed or on it. We don't worry about chewing things like cords and furniture...he has enough toys that he knows is his.

I totally recommend researching the type of dog you want before you buy. Get a crate to make your life easier (especially if you don't have a fenced in yard to let them roam free in.

Plus, our trainer just showed us a prong collar. His only behavioral issue was pulling on the leash. I could control him but he is pushing 50lbs now and the wife can't handle him. So, we got the prong. it basically simulates the mother nipping at their neck skin. It doesn't choke them, it lightly pinches the skin if they pull. So, he ends up walking so nicely at our side now. What a great invention. he no longer tries to choke himself by dragging us!

Here he is:
http://picasaweb.google.com/rcreely/Guinness02?authkey=z_gJ3OFYlnU

Great looking Pup!!! Boy he looks happy in the water with a ball! My Labs loved the water! Sparky even enjoyed running around in the rain. Thanks for sharing! :smile:

Preacher
08-30-2007, 11:52 PM
Actually....

We have Beagles... they are both around 40 pounds... but they are not fat... they are just very big for the breed... you can still feel the ribs... barely, which is perfect for a beagle.

We feed them twice a day. If we let them graze, they would be a hundred pounds...

People say that it is more natural for a dog to graze...as that is what they do in the wild... but that is not true. IN the wild, they had to hunt down, kill, and then eat the food... and then not eat again for a few days maybe, until they were able to kill something else.

About the only thing my dogs hunt now-a-days is the kitchen garbage can... boy are there surprises when we get home, if we forget to put it up!!

memphissteelergirl
08-31-2007, 09:14 AM
While we are on the subject...let me ask you guys this:

Where do you stand on training with treats? I know this is a standard practice, but it seems to me if you do it too long this could also lead to weight issues.

Hammer67
08-31-2007, 09:23 AM
While we are on the subject...let me ask you guys this:

Where do you stand on training with treats? I know this is a standard practice, but it seems to me if you do it too long this could also lead to weight issues.


A good question that I researched thoroughly. I have found that some people are dead set against it as some dogs will not do anything even without treats if that's all you use.
I have found, that early on treats are great and keep a puppy's attention. The trick is to not use too many. I take tiny bits of string cheese or brake a slim jim type of treat into tiny pieces. They work just as well as attention getters and you can make one treat go a long way.

Then, as the puppy grows and learns, generally lessen the number of treats you give them. Just make sure you praise them a ton when they do something right.

If you moderate it like that, you shouldn't have a weight problem. Just break down the treats in to tiny bits for training purposes.

memphissteelergirl
08-31-2007, 10:22 AM
Hammer,

Do you think that's the same for adult dogs? I am planning to adopt one from a shelter or rescue organization.

MACH1
08-31-2007, 10:55 AM
I know you've read more books than you want but this is a really good one that works well, lots of good ideas.
You've might of already seen it?

http://www.amazon.com/Family-Dog-Richard-Wolters/dp/0525944729/ref=pd_sim_b_1/103-0240026-8580665


If you plan on doing any bird hunting look up the one called 'Water Dog', it has more of the retrieving stuff in it.

memphissteelergirl
08-31-2007, 11:35 AM
I know you've read more books than you want but this is a really good one that works well, lots of good ideas.
You've might of already seen it?

http://www.amazon.com/Family-Dog-Richard-Wolters/dp/0525944729/ref=pd_sim_b_1/103-0240026-8580665


If you plan on doing any bird hunting look up the one called 'Water Dog', it has more of the retrieving stuff in it.


Actually, Mach, I am just reading one at the moment "The KISS (i.e., Keep It Simple Series) Guide to Living with a Dog." It is pretty comprehensive.

Steelerstrength
08-31-2007, 12:19 PM
I agree with Hammers method with treats as "attention getters". As the pups mature, lots of praise & love become the treat.

Hammer67
08-31-2007, 12:50 PM
Hammer,

Do you think that's the same for adult dogs? I am planning to adopt one from a shelter or rescue organization.

I don't see why not. Just don't overfeed it and if it is a high energy breed, make sure it gets the proper exercise.

One mistake my sis in law made was allowing their dog to just eat whenever. Dogs, like people, can have different eating habits. So, some will eat everything in front of them (like my dog) or just pick at their food. She left food in their dog's dish all the time and even fed it table scraps. Big no no in my house.

We feed our dog 4 cups a day (two in the morning two in the evening) of it's regular food and complement that with a few milkbones and training treats. he also gets some peanut butter in a kong before we leave in the morning as a treat and to coax him into the crate.

Hammer67
09-03-2007, 07:31 PM
Little update...Guinness made his first road trip this weekend. Went to Louisville KY to visit my parents. 4 1/2 hour car ride. He was awesome....slept a lot and looked out the window. But, my wife found out where she stands as he kicked her out of the front seat and took over as co pilot!

Anyway, my parents have 2 cats. And my sister+husband were also there with their cat. Not a problem as Guinness is laid back with other animals. Everything was cool till we were prepping to leave this morning...Here, Guinness wandered into my sister's bedroom and got into their cat's litter. Eating it! YUCK! I threw him away and with a stern NO! I ushered him outside and got our a hose...he got a good dousing in his mouth to get the litter out.

Gross but hilarious. My wife wouldn't let him lick her the entire ride home so he took over the front seat again and slept.

stillers4me
09-03-2007, 07:34 PM
Gross but hilarious. My wife wouldn't let him lick her the entire ride home so he took over the front seat again and slept.

:nono:bad dog!!

:chuckle:

revefsreleets
09-03-2007, 07:46 PM
I've owned quite a few dogs, and I think I've found an almost perfect regiment. I use three foods (Nutro and Purina One for dry, and Bil Jac wet), and alternate them. If I buy Bil Jac that's what he gets for a week (it spoils after about 9 days), but the Purina One and Nutro I buy in bulk, mix together and it lasts a while.

I feed my dog once in the morning, then walk him and he goes. That is usually around 6:30-6:45 AM. 3 times a week we go on a 3.5 "walk" right after he eats (which is also my interval training). We walk for a bit, run for a mile, walk for a mile, then run for a mile, then walk the last little bit. He also eats when I get home, which is usually around 5:30 PM, and we walk a bit and he goes. He VERY rarely deviates from this, and with those pretty high end foods, he is regular and there are no problems.

Oh, I should add, he is around 7.5 years old, and I just took him to the vet. The vet says he is one of the healthiest dogs he's seen at that age.

stillers4me
09-03-2007, 07:56 PM
Our dogs thrive on Nutro dry foods. I also put salmon oil and brewers yeast on their food every morning. They both have beautiful coats. Cali hasn't had any skin problems since starting her on the salmon oil. We used to have to take her to the vet at least once a year for cortisone shots and antibiotics because her skin got so dry. Schnauzers notorious for skin allergies and Maggie's skin is smooth silk. Good stuff.

Hammer67
09-03-2007, 08:02 PM
Our dogs thrive on Nutro dry foods. I also put salmon oil and brewers yeast on their food every morning. They both have beautiful coats. Cali hasn't had any skin problems since starting her on the salmon oil. We used to have to take her to the vet at least once a year for cortisone shots and antibiotics because her skin got so dry. Schnauzers notorious for skin allergies and Maggie's skin is smooth silk. Good stuff.

Peanut Butter is also good for that...nice shiny coat!

revefsreleets
09-03-2007, 08:49 PM
I put peanut butter in a kong toy when I put my dog in his cage. It cuts down on seperation anxiety, keeps him busy for awhile, settles his stomach, and, like you said, is good for his coat.