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fansince'76
12-11-2007, 09:15 PM
I am personally torn by this article, because I can see both sides of the issue. On one hand, I can understand the security reasons for not delivering anonymous mail to anybody in particular. On the other hand, I, perhaps naively, think the vast majority of these messages being sent are with the best of intentions, particularly postcards. I'd like to know what other folks here at SF think about it?

U.S. Refuses `Any Wounded Soldier' Mail

By Jay Reeves, Associated Press Writer
Tue Dec 11, 2:22 PM ET

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Hundreds of thousands of holiday cards and letters thanking wounded American troops for their sacrifice and wishing them well never reach their destination. They are returned to sender or thrown away unopened.

Since the Sept. 11 attacks and the anthrax scare, the Pentagon and the Postal Service have refused to deliver mail addressed simply to "Any Wounded Soldier" for fear terrorists or opponents of the war might send toxic substances or demoralizing messages.

Mail must be addressed to a specific member of the armed forces — a rule that pains some well-meaning Americans this Christmas season.

"Are we going to forget our soldiers because we are running in fear?" Fena D'Ottavio asked. The suburban Chicago woman was using her blog to encourage friends to send mail to unspecified soldiers until she learned of the ban, which she called a sad commentary on society.

Last season, despite the rule, officials say as many as 450,000 pieces of mail not addressed to anyone in particular managed to reach Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. But they were returned or, if they had no return address, were thrown out altogether, because the hospital lacked the manpower to open and screen all the mail, spokesman Terry Goodman said.

"A lot of this is because of security concerns because it's unsolicited mail that someone is going to have to go through," Goodman said. "Also, being a democratic society, there could be inappropriate mail from someone who, say, doesn't support the war, and then you've got a wounded soldier getting it."

Lt. Col. Kevin Arata, a spokesman with the Army Human Resources Command, said no one tracks the amount of unnamed-soldier mail being returned, so it is impossible to judge the size of the problem.

The busiest part of the holiday season has yet to arrive, but officials said they are receiving far less mail this year addressed simply to "A Recovering American Soldier" or "Any Wounded Soldier."

Candy Roquemore of Austin, Texas, was also promoting the idea of sending cards to wounded soldiers until she found out about the rule. She suggested the ban is an overreaction.

"I think there are some wackos who might do something, so I can understand that. But I think with a Christmas postcard it would be pretty easy to see it doesn't have anthrax in it," Roquemore said.

She added: "I just wanted to say, `Thank you, sorry you're hurt, and happy holidays.'"

USO spokesman John Hanson said that like the military, the nonprofit service organization does not deliver unopened mail to unspecified recipients. He said the USO worries about security as well as hateful messages from war critics.

"We just want to make sure it's not, `Die, baby killer,'" he said. "There are people out there who act irrationally, and we don't want anyone to get a message that would be discouraging."

The USO is one of the organizations the military is encouraging people to support with donations as an alternative to sending cards to unspecified soldiers. The military is also referring people to the American Red Cross and a Defense Department Web site where supporters have posted thousands of messages to troops.

Some groups are offering to forward mail to the troops. Aides to Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., are offering to accept letters, screen them through the U.S. Capitol mail operation, and get them to members of the armed forces.

"We've had about a dozen complaints from constituents about returned mail that they sent to troops," said Steven Boyd, a Sessions spokesman.

On the Net:

To Our Soldiers: http://www4.army.mil/ocpa/tooursoldiers/

U.S. Refuses "Any Wounded Soldier" Mail (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071211/ap_on_re_us/troops_mail_ban)

touchdownward
12-11-2007, 09:29 PM
I have to agree with the U.S not delivering this mail due to security issues.
I know most people mean very well, but sadly it's what our world has come to.

fansince'76
12-11-2007, 09:34 PM
I have to agree with the U.S not delivering this mail due to security issues.
I know most people mean very well, but sadly it's what our world has come to.

Yeah, I guess the overriding concern is security above all else in the long run. It's a shame, though.

GBMelBlount
12-11-2007, 09:44 PM
Thanks '76. I want to thank all those on SF (& everywhere) who have sacrificed for our country. God Bless you all.

SteelCityMan786
12-11-2007, 09:49 PM
Well I might have the mail inspected via technology. Although yeah, National Security matters to.

Godfather
12-12-2007, 10:42 AM
Simple solution: Screen the mail. If it's addressed to "Any Wounded Soldier" you don't have to worry about anything private or personal being in the letter. Throw away the letters that insult or threaten the soldier and pass on the legitimate ones.

Polamalu Princess
12-12-2007, 07:51 PM
I see both sides as well, but all I can say is God bless our troops and God bless all that have served. Thank all of you for your service.

May God bless you and keep you in His loving care.

Preacher
12-13-2007, 03:30 PM
I have to agree with the decision... and sadly so. I also feel horrible for those who are trying to do something nice, and can't because of these rules.

God bless them all... the soldiers, and those who are trying to support them.

SteelersMongol
12-14-2007, 10:07 PM
Simple solution: Screen the mail. If it's addressed to "Any Wounded Soldier" you don't have to worry about anything private or personal being in the letter. Throw away the letters that insult or threaten the soldier and pass on the legitimate ones.

I agree. But they could also run a website 4 this purpose. No a-hole could ruin that one.

4 my part, I want 2 say I'm thankful 4 the people who r serving the country, & may God bless you all.