PDA

View Full Version : Who is the real Huckabee?


Steelerstrength
01-18-2008, 03:50 PM
I?m a registered Independent, and have enjoyed analyzing the strategy of each candidate. This one by The Huckster surprised me. I?ve been intrigued by the consumption tax, but believe it to be impossible to implement. Here is what he had to say.

_______________________________________
MYRTLE BEACH, South Carolina (CNN) -- Reacting to criticism by his own party that he is too liberal, Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee is highlighting his conservative, evangelical Southern credentials to South Carolina primary voters.
The Iowa caucus winner weighed in Thursday on the state's perennial debate over displaying the Confederate flag, expressing sympathy with those who believe the rebel banner should be flown. The flag is also considered by many to be a symbol of slavery.
"You don't like people from outside the state telling you what to do with your flag," he told an audience in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. "In fact, if somebody came to Arkansas and told us what to do with our flag, we'd tell them where to put the pole."
But later in the day at another campaign stop in Columbia, South Carolina, Huckabee said the flag matter "has no business from the president of the United States."
"It's really not something that's an issue for the president of the United States," he said. "That's an issue for the people of South Carolina to deal with."
__________________________________________

Several years back I was on a business trip to Charleston. While there, my good friend (whom I consider extended family) drove me around town. My friend is an articulate, well educated engineer, with two young children who were not present, provided interesting history and perspective of the sites.

After I noticed many trucks, vans and other vehicles with the Confederate Flag on them, I asked if he had an issue with it. Also pointing out that many of the trucks had gun racks in the back window, and this is downtown. (Some trucks hoisted a large Confederate Flag on a pole in the back of their truck)

He replied, ?In many ways we are still treated as second class citizens here. The symbol that loudly declares the epitome of racism adorns our capitol building. To me it?s the celebration of slavery, and how they fought for the right to own my people as property. And I have to explain that to my boys.?

Per Wikipedia:
?In 2005, two Western Carolina University researchers found that 74% of African-Americans polled favored removing the flag from the South Carolina State House altogether.?

My opinion, Huckabee made a monumental mistake, and obviously attempted to back-pedal. He successfully alienated most of the Black vote with audacity. More importantly, he lost any further consideration of attaining my support in any way, period.

Jeremy
01-19-2008, 09:05 PM
He's not an intelligent man and he's basically a bitter person as well.

He's going to fade from the race very quickly. Now that McCain has taken South Carolina, The Huckster is basically toast. He might pull one or two more wins, But it's a two horse race between Senator McCain and The Mitter.

revefsreleets
01-21-2008, 04:08 PM
I like McCain. I think he's a good man and he's gotten a bad rap. Bush's camp treated him like garbage in '04. I just wish he wasn't so far right on a few social issues. I'm pretty conservative concerning fiscal policy, but much softer and moderate on social issues. Still, he's got my vote. I also still think Thompson will be his running mate, although I'd prefer someone a little more moderate, if not even slightly left on social issues to balance the ticket a little.

Preacher
01-21-2008, 04:17 PM
I like McCain. I think he's a good man and he's gotten a bad rap. Bush's camp treated him like garbage in '04. I just wish he wasn't so far right on a few social issues. I'm pretty conservative concerning fiscal policy, but much softer and moderate on social issues. Still, he's got my vote. I also still think Thompson will be his running mate, although I'd prefer someone a little more moderate, if not even slightly left on social issues to balance the ticket a little.

My problem with McCain is that he continually undercuts the GOP. The "Gang of 14" was inexcusable. The more I think about it, the more I have to agree with a friend that McCain, by his actions, proclaims that he knows better then most of the GOP.

I also stand opposed to his beliefs on gun control.

I am very appreciative of what he did in Vietnam. I love his backing of the military. I want him as our next SecDef. I don't want him as president. However, I will definitely vote for him against Hillary or Osama.

revefsreleets
01-21-2008, 04:40 PM
There is no perfect candidate. And I'm sorry, the GOP of late has become pretty pathetic. They need a good shaking up.

Preacher
01-21-2008, 04:45 PM
There is no perfect candidate. And I'm sorry, the GOP of late has become pretty pathetic. They need a good shaking up.

No reason to be sorry about it. Scream it from the mountaintop. Hopefully someone will listen.

I am ticked about the candidates the GOP has put up.

revefsreleets
01-21-2008, 04:56 PM
The only thing that will save them is that the opposition doesn't have much to counter, and the decent candidates they do have will all get crushed under the weight of the Clinton/Obama earning machine.

I'm not even sure that Obama is such a bad guy. He's just a little naive, which is the fundamental and ultimately fatal flaw with most extreme liberal political views.

HometownGal
01-21-2008, 05:16 PM
No reason to be sorry about it. Scream it from the mountaintop. Hopefully someone will listen.

I am ticked about the candidates the GOP has put up.

It is not a great selection, that's for sure, but I firmly believe that if Bitchary wins the Demo nomination, the GOP could put up Elmer Fudd and they'd keep the White House. This country simply is not, imho, ready for a woman Prez and especially not THAT woman (?).

Sadly enough, though I am a GOP'er, I'd probably vote for John Edwards if he won the nomination, which he won't.

Preacher
01-21-2008, 08:14 PM
It is not a great selection, that's for sure, but I firmly believe that if Bitchary wins the Demo nomination, the GOP could put up Elmer Fudd and they'd keep the White House. This country simply is not, imho, ready for a woman Prez and especially not THAT woman (?).

Sadly enough, though I am a GOP'er, I'd probably vote for John Edwards if he won the nomination, which he won't.

Funny...

I think we are definitely ready for a woman... I think we are NOT ready for Hillary. I have said it for a long time that in my opinion, the first female and first black presidents will be elected out of the GOP simply because of the way the two parties work.

SteelCityMan786
01-21-2008, 08:32 PM
Funny...

I think we are definitely ready for a woman... I think we are NOT ready for Hillary. I have said it for a long time that in my opinion, the first female and first black presidents will be elected out of the GOP simply because of the way the two parties work.

This is a bad time for the country to have a woman preisdent.

I'd much rather experience living in PA with a woman in Harrisburg as Governor first before I say we should have a woman president.

TackleMeBen
01-21-2008, 08:59 PM
i have a woman governor and she blows.. michigan's economy is the worst in the country and she is doing nothing about it. people are having to sell their houses b/c they cant afford them anymore. you can go down a street and every other house has a for sale sign in it. its very sad.

i sort of like huckbee. not that i would vote for him for president but i like some of the things he stands for. (guess i am a holy roller..lol)

Preacher
01-21-2008, 09:07 PM
This is a bad time for the country to have a woman preisdent.

I'd much rather experience living in PA with a woman in Harrisburg as Governor first before I say we should have a woman president.

We don't need a "tryout" for a woman to be president. Historically, Bhutto, Thatcher, and a few others have proven that a woman has as much ability to be a national leader as a man. I really don't care about their plumbing.

What I do care about is their policies and philosophy. I would be very happy if we had a women who was able to govern like either of the above.

Preacher
01-21-2008, 10:33 PM
http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D8UAI7FO0&show_article=1

Huckabee as a VP?

If he can draw the black vote from the dems.. you better believe he will be a vp.

ESPECIALLY if Hillary wins the dem nom.

revefsreleets
01-22-2008, 09:15 AM
Will ripped up McCain pretty bad yesterday, basically called hima Democrat:

http://www.townhall.com/columnists/GeorgeWill/2008/01/18/fact-checking_the_straight-talk

Fact-Checking the Straight-Talk
By George Will
Friday, January 18, 2008

WASHINGTON -- In 2004, one of John McCain's closest associates, John Weaver, spoke to John Kerry about the possibility of McCain running as Kerry's vice presidential running mate. In "No Excuses," Bob Shrum's memoir of his role in numerous presidential campaigns, including Kerry's, Shrum writes that Weaver assured Kerry that "McCain was serious about the possibility of teaming up with him," and Kerry approached McCain. He, however, was more serious about seeking the 2008 Republican nomination.

But was it unreasonable for Kerry to think McCain might be comfortable on a Democratic ticket? Not really.

In ABC's New Hampshire debate, McCain said: "Why shouldn't we be able to reimport drugs from Canada?" A conservative's answer is:

That amounts to importing Canada's price controls, a large step toward a system in which some medicines would be inexpensive but many others -- new pain-relieving, life-extending pharmaceuticals -- would be unavailable. Setting drug prices by government fiat rather than market forces results in huge reductions of funding for research and development of new drugs. McCain's evident aim is to reduce pharmaceutical companies' profits. But if all those profits were subtracted from the nation's health care bill, the pharmaceutical component of that bill would be reduced only from 10 percent to 8 percent -- and innovation would stop, taking a terrible toll in unnecessary suffering and premature death. When McCain explains that trade-off to voters, he will actually have engaged in straight talk.

There are decent, intelligent people who believe that equity or efficiency or both are often served by government setting prices. In America, such people are called Democrats.

Because McCain is a "maverick" -- the media encomium reserved for Republicans who reject important Republican principles -- he would be a conciliatory president. He has indeed worked with Ted Kennedy on immigration reform, with Russ Feingold on restricting political speech (McCain-Feingold) and with Kennedy and John Edwards -- a trial lawyer drawn to an enlargement of opportunities for litigation -- on the "patients' bill of rights."

McCain is, however, an unlikely conciliator because he is quick to denigrate the motives, and hence the characters, of those who oppose him. He promiscuously accuses others of "corruption," the ubiquity of which he says justifies McCain-Feingold's expansive government regulation of the quantity, timing and content of campaign speech.

McCain says he would nominate Supreme Court justices similar to Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts and Sam Alito. But how likely is he to nominate jurists who resemble those four: They consider his signature achievement constitutionally dubious.

When the Supreme Court upheld McCain-Feingold 5-4, Scalia and Thomas were in the minority. That was before Alito replaced Sandra Day O'Connor, who was in the majority. Two years later, McCain filed his own brief supporting federal suppression of a right-to-life group's issue advertisement in Wisconsin because it mentioned a candidate for federal office during the McCain-Feingold blackout period prior to an election. The court ruled 5-4 against McCain's position, with Alito in the majority.

In the New Hampshire debate, McCain asserted that corruption is the reason drugs currently cannot be reimported from Canada. The reason is "the power of the pharmaceutical companies." When Mitt Romney interjected, "Don't turn the pharmaceutical companies into the big bad guys," McCain replied, "Well, they are."

There is a place in American politics for moralizers who think in such Manichaean simplicities. That place is in the Democratic Party, where people who talk like McCain are considered not mavericks but mainstream.

Republicans are supposed to eschew demagogic aspersions concerning complicated economic matters. But applause greets faux "straight talk" that brands as "bad" the industry responsible for the facts that polio is no longer a scourge, that childhood leukemia is no longer a death sentence, that depression and other mental illnesses are treatable diseases, that the rate of heart attacks and heart failures has been cut more than in half in 50 years.

When McCain and Joe Lieberman introduced legislation empowering Congress to comprehensively regulate U.S. industries' emissions of greenhouse gases in order to "prevent catastrophic global warming," they co-authored an op-ed column that radiated McCainian intolerance of disagreement. It said that a U.N. panel's report "puts the final nail in denial's coffin about the problem of global warming." Concerning the question of whether human activity is causing catastrophic warming, they said, "the debate has ended."

Interesting, is it not, that no one considers it necessary to insist that "the debate has ended" about whether the Earth is round. People only insist that a debate stop when they are afraid of what might be learned if it continues.

HometownGal
01-22-2008, 09:28 AM
I think Will is stretching a little bit on McCain, but I can't totally disagree with some of what he wrote.

McCain turned me totally off in the 2004 election when he rode the fence between Bush and Kerry. Take a stance John and stick with it.

Jeremy
01-22-2008, 10:21 AM
George Will is still alive? Who knew.

Bottom line here is the country can't afford someone like The Huckster. Not as President and damn sure not as Vice President. The last thing we need is someone who's going to turn the War on Terrorism in to some kind of Holy War with Christians against Muslims. Elect The Huckster and that's exactly what you'll have.

On a side nore, Chuck Norris should not talk about people being too old for things. Chuck Norris is too old to be shilling for exercise equipment, yet there he is on television all the time talking about the Total Gym. I'm tired of Chuck Norris and I'm tired of The Huckster. They need to pack up their White Trash side show and go home now.

lamberts-lost-tooth
01-22-2008, 10:26 AM
I think the Clintons left a couple of rolls of chicken wire in the back yard....JUST IN CASE Huckabee or Hillary get a crack at the White House.

Jeremy
01-22-2008, 10:37 AM
I think the Clintons left a couple of rolls of chicken wire in the back yard....JUST IN CASE Huckabee or Hillary get a crack at the White House.

You nailed that one LLT. We might see a pro wrestling event in the Rose Garden if The Huckster steal the White House.