PDA

View Full Version : Why I'm OK with Arlen Specter's involvement in Spygate


lamberts-lost-tooth
02-17-2008, 02:05 PM
Why I'm OK with Arlen Specter's involvement in Spygate
By MJD
yahoo sports
Friday, Feb 15, 2008 9:01 am EST


You'll get no argument from me that the government has more important things to worry about than professional football. The war, the economy, health care, all of that stuff. It's all infinitely more important than football. Obviously.

However, 100 years from now, when your children's children's children are reading their digital history books, I doubt there's going to be any chapter that reads, "The United States lost the war on terror and crumbled as a nation, and all of that could have been avoided if only Arlen Specter had not spent that hour-and-a-half with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell."

I honestly think that the issue at hand is a big enough deal to warrant a Senator's involvement. Again, I agree that the government has more important things to worry about than football. But it's not like the entire Senate is taking two weeks to debate a pass interference call. It's not like we've got a government shutdown so all of our politicians can work on passing a bill that prohibits the Lions from taking another wide receiver in the 1st round of the draft.

We're talking about a major corporation selling a fraudulent product. The NFL is a huge corporate monolith that sells a product to the public. And if there's a chance that that product is fraudulent, and is not the honest and fair competition the NFL purports it to be, I say that's a big deal.

If you're selling something--especially if you enjoy an antitrust exemption granted by the government--that something has to be what you say it is.

Imagine there was a major food company, and the government said to them, "Yes, it's OK if you're the only major food company in the country, and you shut everyone else down." And say that food company was selling cereal that claimed to be 100% whole grain, but was actually composed of 30% pencil shavings and 20% scrap metal. You'd want to know, right? You'd want to know that what they were peddling wasn't what they claimed it to be.

Granted, watching someone cheat at football isn't quite as damaging as eating a half-a-pound of pencil shavings every morning, but I still want to know when I'm being lied to.

And I think the level of government involvement here is appropriate. So far, it's been one 90-minute meeting with one Senator. It's not like baseball, where we're dedicating a whole day of public hearings and wasting hours of everyone's time because we want to hear about Roger Clemens' ass-bleeding and his wife showing off her fake jubblies, with no new information coming out.

It's been one Senator, and one meeting. That's all we've had so far. And that one meeting produced at least a few facts that we didn't already know.

If I could choose how Arlen Specter spent his time, and the choices were A) find the best way to get our troops home safely, B) make health care available to everyone, or C) find out just how much the Patriots cheated, obviously, I'd choose A or B.

However, A and B really weren't options, were they? Can the Senator do that by himself? I'd like to think that if Specter could accomplish either of those in 90 minutes, he'd have done it by now.

The more realistic choices for how Specter spent that time would be A) find out just how much the Patriots cheated, or B) nap. And in that case, I'll take A.

Borski
02-17-2008, 02:24 PM
I agree with this, there are more important things to do, but the NFL does sell a product and if something is being frauded it needs to be exposed.

Think of all the Rams, Panthers, and Eagles fans that spent several thousand dollars on SB tickets (not to mention other teams that faced the Pats in the Playoffs) how do they feel after spending all that money, then going home heartbroken accepting that their team lost, then fastforword to today they find out about the Pats cheating and they might, just might not have lost that game, they may not have wasted all that money on a rigged game.

stillers4me
02-17-2008, 02:28 PM
And hey....as one Pats* fan already pointed out in another thread, "the end justifies the means".

Knock yourself out, Arlen.

Boss Smiley
02-17-2008, 03:09 PM
The ends justify the means. I don't care what they do, I just want the Patriots to win.

HometownGal
02-17-2008, 04:04 PM
The ends justify the means. I don't care what they do, I just want the Patriots to win.

You must have been stuffed in a locker too many times while in high school and are suffering from oxygen deprivation.

By the time Arlen is done with your precious Cheatsies*, you'll be back to cheering on one of the local sandlot teams.

http://www.secsportsfan.com/images/patriots_spygate_logo.gif

Rhee Rhee
02-17-2008, 04:11 PM
By the time Arlen is done with your precious Cheatsies*, you'll be back to cheering on one of the local sandlot teams.


amen to that :sofunny:

revefsreleets
02-17-2008, 08:19 PM
No fan of Specter, but he's definitely doing an "absolute good" here. Death to the Patriots evil regime of deceit!

lilyoder6
02-17-2008, 08:24 PM
i don't want this to become what baseball has become with the gonv.. but i hope spector gets it right and this would be the last time to see anything like it int eh future

Dino 6 Rings
02-18-2008, 09:47 AM
Tax dollars help to pay for NFL Stadiums...I'm ok with Congress looking into the product not being tainted, like Mad Cow or something.

rbryan
02-18-2008, 10:25 AM
The Government already pisses away billion$ annually. At least I'll get some satisfaction from this.

TheWarDen86
02-20-2008, 06:41 PM
Hey why did Boss Smiley get banned???? He was MY PERSONAL WHIPPING BOY! I just got him a personalized water dish had his name stitched in his collar too. :dang:

Man, I'm never going to have my own pet troll. :pity:

83-Steelers-43
02-20-2008, 07:11 PM
:thumbsup:

Who looks worse - Belichick or Goodell?
By Joe Starkey
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Mr. Tough Guy. That was Roger Goodell last spring.

Following his first season as NFL commissioner, Goodell vowed to refurbish the league's image. He put some meat to his promise by issuing a series of player suspensions.

Nobody messed with The Commish. People praised him -- but their compliments look silly today, amid the ever-expanding saga that is Spygate.

Goodell has become as big a story as Bill Belichick in this matter and looks every bit as bad.

Goodell's the one who ordered the destruction of evidence documenting the New England Patriots' illegal videotaping of opposing coaches' signals.

Goodell's the one, according to Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), who levied the penalty before receiving all the evidence of New England's activities.

That penalty -- fines plus the forfeiture of a first-round pick -- looked ridiculously lame compared to Goodell's draconian treatment of wayward players. He didn't suspend Belichick and didn't even have the guts to take New England's top pick (No. 7 overall) but rather their lower first-round pick.

Before all this, back when Mr. Tough Guy was doling out suspensions like Skittles, The Washington Post quoted David Carter, executive director of the Sports Business Institute at Southern Cal, thusly:

"(Goodell) has succinctly delivered a message of what the NFL stands for and what it expects. He understands that falling short on these issues would hurt his brand and hurt the owners' ability to generate revenues. He understands what it would mean if the sponsors came to regard the NFL as 'The Longest Yard.' "

What would it mean if the sponsors learned of a devious coach cheating his way to Super Bowl wins?

That might be a gross exaggeration, but there is so much we don't know about Belichick's operation. We'd likely know more if the NFL had conducted a serious investigation and, you know, kept the evidence. You have to wonder why Belichick continued the practice for so long if it wasn't providing a competitive advantage.

Belichick has denied a report he had a St. Louis Rams workout filmed the day before the 2002 Super Bowl, but why should anybody believe him?

Here's another beauty of a quote from the same Post story.

Remember, this was long before Spygate.

"(Goodell) understands, like we in ownership understand, that the American public wants to become emotionally involved in our teams and players," Patriots owner Robert Kraft said. "That's the reason these companies spend the money they do and these (television) networks spend the money they do. Certain behavior isn't tolerated by the American public."

Like cheating?

Thank goodness Specter came along. Only a person in a position of power could have prevented Goodell from burying this issue. After his meeting with Goodell last week, Specter said he was told Belichick's cheating goes back to 2000, a tidbit Goodell had conveniently avoided mentioning in public.

Look, Specter probably has questionable motives. He's probably grandstanding. But he also has become football's answer to Jose Canseco - the wacko who blew the whistle.

Somebody had to do it.

And if you think the NFL would look bad if Spygate reached a courtroom or the Senate floor, imagine somebody with clout pressing Mr. Tough Guy on players and their pharmaceutical habits.

Here's what Goodell said when this reporter asked him, in October, 2006, if the NFL has a problem with performance-enhancing drugs:

"I don't think it's a problem."

That was funnier than anything Burt Reynolds said in "The Longest Yard."

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/s_553223.html

83-Steelers-43
02-20-2008, 07:16 PM
Thank goodness Specter came along. Only a person in a position of power could have prevented Goodell from burying this issue. After his meeting with Goodell last week, Specter said he was told Belichick's cheating goes back to 2000, a tidbit Goodell had conveniently avoided mentioning in public.

Look, Specter probably has questionable motives. He's probably grandstanding. But he also has become football's answer to Jose Canseco - the wacko who blew the whistle.

Somebody had to do it.

:nw:

Nice to know Starkey get's it.