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revefsreleets
05-07-2008, 11:29 AM
Radical change...Bush II indeed.

http://www.ohio.com/editorial/commentary/18718074.html?page=all&c=y

All-around winner on health care? McCain
By Michael Tanner


Published on Wednesday, May 07, 2008
WASHINGTON: John McCain is proposing the most radical overhaul of American health-care policy in a decade and a half. Not since Bill and Hillary Clinton's failed reform attempt has a presidential candidate, or even a president, called for such sweeping changes to the way health care is delivered and health insurance is purchased.
The New York Times reported on Thursday that 71 percent of Americans now receive insurance through their place of employment, but employer-based health insurance is a historical accident, stemming from a combination of labor shortages and wage controls during World War II. It limits consumer choice by giving decisions over coverage to employers rather than employees, meaning workers who lose their jobs lose their insurance. And individuals who do not receive employer-provided insurance face a greater financial burden when they try to buy insurance on their own.
Why should that be?
McCain would move us away from such a system. He would count at least some of a worker's employer-paid insurance as taxable income. At the same time, he would provide all Americans with a $2,500 refundable tax credit for individuals and a $5,000 credit for families, regardless of how people obtain their insurance.
McCain's proposal exposes him to criticism that he would put people with pre-existing conditions at a disadvantage, because they have a hard time finding affordable individual coverage. But his campaign says he is considering risk-rating the tax credit he would offer, providing more money to those who need it most. And McCain would use federal funds to subsidize state high-risk pools already covering those who have trouble buying insurance in the open market.
In addition, McCain's campaign maintains that his proposal would make insurance more affordable for everyone, including those with pre-existing conditions. In particular, by making insurance more affordable to the young and healthy, McCain's plan will attract them into the market before they develop pre-existing conditions. And McCain rightly claims that deregulation will lead to the creation of new and innovative insurance products that can help solve these problems.
Most notably, McCain would allow people to purchase health insurance across state lines, a practice now prohibited. Health insurance is largely regulated at the state level, and the different regulations and mandates in each mean prices vary widely from state to state.
For example, New Jersey imposes more than 40 mandated benefits, including in-vitro fertilization, contraceptives, chiropodists, coverage of children until they reach age 25, and other regulations. As a result, according to the Commonwealth Fund, the cost of a standard health insurance policy for a healthy 25-year old man in New Jersey comes to $5,580.
However, a similar policy in Kentucky, which has far fewer mandates, would cost him only $960 per year. Unfortunately, it is illegal for that hypothetical New Jersey resident to buy the cheaper Kentucky plan. McCain would change that.
McCain would also allow people to purchase insurance through non-traditional groups. Today, three types of organizations can offer group insurance: employers, unions and trade associations. McCain would open this to other groups, notably churches and professional organizations.
Finally, McCain wants to change not only who pays for health care, but how they pay for it. McCain challenges the concept of traditional ''fee for service'' medicine.
''We should pay a single bill for high-quality health care,'' he says, ''not an endless series of bills for pre-surgical tests and visits, hospitalization and surgery, and follow-up tests, drugs and office visits.''
McCain also rightly calls for greater transparency for health-care costs and prices. ''Families, insurance companies, the government whoever is paying the bill must understand exactly what their care costs are and the outcome they received.''
Steve Parente, professor of finance at the University of Minnesota, estimates that the McCain plan would cut the number of uninsured Americans by roughly half. But equally important, McCain's proposal would drive down the cost of health care for everyone.
As Democrats often claim, the status quo isn't working, and that's because so many people are stuck without any good options. McCain's proposal would give people back the choices they need to get better care. And he would do it without having the government take over the health system.

That's a radical change, and the right idea.
Tanner is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute and author of Leviathan on the Right.

WASHINGTON: John McCain is proposing the most radical overhaul of American health-care policy in a decade and a half. Not since Bill and Hillary Clinton's failed reform attempt has a presidential candidate, or even a president, called for such sweeping changes to the way health care is delivered and health insurance is purchased.
The New York Times reported on Thursday that 71 percent of Americans now receive insurance through their place of employment, but employer-based health insurance is a historical accident, stemming from a combination of labor shortages and wage controls during World War II. It limits consumer choice by giving decisions over coverage to employers rather than employees, meaning workers who lose their jobs lose their insurance. And individuals who do not receive employer-provided insurance face a greater financial burden when they try to buy insurance on their own.
Why should that be?
McCain would move us away from such a system. He would count at least some of a worker's employer-paid insurance as taxable income. At the same time, he would provide all Americans with a $2,500 refundable tax credit for individuals and a $5,000 credit for families, regardless of how people obtain their insurance.
McCain's proposal exposes him to criticism that he would put people with pre-existing conditions at a disadvantage, because they have a hard time finding affordable individual coverage. But his campaign says he is considering risk-rating the tax credit he would offer, providing more money to those who need it most. And McCain would use federal funds to subsidize state high-risk pools already covering those who have trouble buying insurance in the open market.
In addition, McCain's campaign maintains that his proposal would make insurance more affordable for everyone, including those with pre-existing conditions. In particular, by making insurance more affordable to the young and healthy, McCain's plan will attract them into the market before they develop pre-existing conditions. And McCain rightly claims that deregulation will lead to the creation of new and innovative insurance products that can help solve these problems.
Most notably, McCain would allow people to purchase health insurance across state lines, a practice now prohibited. Health insurance is largely regulated at the state level, and the different regulations and mandates in each mean prices vary widely from state to state.
For example, New Jersey imposes more than 40 mandated benefits, including in-vitro fertilization, contraceptives, chiropodists, coverage of children until they reach age 25, and other regulations. As a result, according to the Commonwealth Fund, the cost of a standard health insurance policy for a healthy 25-year old man in New Jersey comes to $5,580.
However, a similar policy in Kentucky, which has far fewer mandates, would cost him only $960 per year. Unfortunately, it is illegal for that hypothetical New Jersey resident to buy the cheaper Kentucky plan. McCain would change that.
McCain would also allow people to purchase insurance through non-traditional groups. Today, three types of organizations can offer group insurance: employers, unions and trade associations. McCain would open this to other groups, notably churches and professional organizations.
Finally, McCain wants to change not only who pays for health care, but how they pay for it. McCain challenges the concept of traditional ''fee for service'' medicine.
''We should pay a single bill for high-quality health care,'' he says, ''not an endless series of bills for pre-surgical tests and visits, hospitalization and surgery, and follow-up tests, drugs and office visits.''
McCain also rightly calls for greater transparency for health-care costs and prices. ''Families, insurance companies, the government whoever is paying the bill must understand exactly what their care costs are and the outcome they received.''
Steve Parente, professor of finance at the University of Minnesota, estimates that the McCain plan would cut the number of uninsured Americans by roughly half. But equally important, McCain's proposal would drive down the cost of health care for everyone.
As Democrats often claim, the status quo isn't working, and that's because so many people are stuck without any good options. McCain's proposal would give people back the choices they need to get better care. And he would do it without having the government take over the health system.
That's a radical change, and the right idea.

Dino 6 Rings
05-07-2008, 11:41 AM
Really, I don't care what any of these 3 fools promise, but the second they raise my taxes, I'm going to Boston and I'm throwing Gasoline into the harbor!!!

All Three of these cadidates are millionaires, and all of them think they know how to "fix" the world.

All of these career politicians make me ill. I need health insurance because of the ulcers reading all of their ideas gives me.

Rule 1 for all politicians should be, you get 12 years of office and that's it. If you can't get your agenda in Senate, Congress, as Governor done in 12 years, they you don't freaking deserve it and need to get into the private sector again and earn your keep. People need to wake up, and we need to meet in Boston and toss tea, or gas, into the harbor and tell these fools, to stop sucking off my tax dollars, and start working for us!!!

Excuse me while I step down from my soap box and go to my Doctor to examine my sore throat.

Jeremy
05-07-2008, 12:47 PM
McCain would also allow people to purchase insurance through non-traditional groups. Today, three types of organizations can offer group insurance: employers, unions and trade associations. McCain would open this to other groups, notably churches and professional organizations.

Read between the lines folks. It's the same old crap in a shiny new package.

X-Terminator
05-08-2008, 06:58 AM
What same old crap do you speak of? Maybe I'm dense, but I don't see much wrong with letting a group of like minded people act as a group(read church). The govt does it for all types of organizations why not churches.

If you don't know the answer to that question, then you really haven't been paying attention.

McCain's idea is an interesting one though. My only beef is that it still does not address people in my mother's condition - disabled, on Medicare and Social Security. Yes, it mentions pre-existing conditions, but for the most part, those plans would still be too expensive for her, even though all she'd need it for was to cover the 20% that Medicare doesn't. If there would be a way to pro-rate it so that she only pays for the amount of coverage she needs, that would be great. His idea may or may not work, but at least someone is trying to come up with a solution that doesn't involve turning it all over to the government.

revefsreleets
05-08-2008, 08:37 AM
Look, it's the best thing to roll down the chute in a long time. Of course it's not perferct, but it's a Helluva lot better than the staus quo. I expect the haters to hate, because that's all they do, but for the open minded and enlightened, this is a solid plan and a step in the right direction.

Jeremy
05-08-2008, 08:43 AM
Look, it's the best thing to roll down the chute in a long time. Of course it's not perferct, but it's a Helluva lot better than the staus quo. I expect the haters to hate, because that's all they do, but for the open minded and enlightened, this is a solid plan and a step in the right direction.

I still see a lot more theory than actual plan. How's he going to accomplish what he proposes? Until all this theory is more solid, it's just more double talk from a politician trying to get elected.

GBMelBlount
05-08-2008, 09:42 AM
Read between the lines folks.

No need to read between the lines Jeremy, this excerpt from the article pretty much shows you what happens when the government gets over involved.

For example, New Jersey imposes more than 40 mandated benefits, including in-vitro fertilization, contraceptives, chiropodists, coverage of children until they reach age 25, and other regulations. As a result, according to the Commonwealth Fund, the cost of a standard health insurance policy for a healthy 25-year old man in New Jersey comes to $5,580.
However, a similar policy in Kentucky, which has far fewer mandates, would cost him only $960 per year. Unfortunately, it is illegal for that hypothetical New Jersey resident to buy the cheaper Kentucky plan. McCain would change that.

Jeremy
05-08-2008, 10:00 AM
No need to read between the lines Jeremy, this excerpt from the article pretty much shows you what happens when the government gets over involved.

He would count at least some of a worker's employer-paid insurance as taxable income.

And so it begins.

BIGBENFASTWILLIE
05-08-2008, 10:06 AM
Really, I don't care what any of these 3 fools promise, but the second they raise my taxes, I'm going to Boston and I'm throwing Gasoline into the harbor!!!

Hey........I'll go with ya.......Sounds like a good time.

Im sure taxes will be raised.......Remember, the only thing that the United States makes anymore is DEBT.

GBMelBlount
05-08-2008, 10:06 AM
And so it begins.

Indeed, social engineering at it's best.

revefsreleets
05-08-2008, 10:58 AM
You guys have lost me completely...

Jeremy
05-08-2008, 11:01 AM
Steve Parente, professor of finance at the University of Minnesota, estimates that the McCain plan would cut the number of uninsured Americans by roughly half. But equally important, McCain's proposal would drive down the cost of health care for everyone.

I thought this part was great as well. It would be far too much to ask that they provide any stats to back this up. No, it's easier to assume the average American is a moron who's going to believe anything a University professor says.

I've already seen too many examples of McCain double talk and lies to believe anything he says anymore.

Jeremy
05-08-2008, 11:02 AM
You guys have lost me completely...

We've had this discussion before.

GBMelBlount
05-08-2008, 11:15 AM
You guys have lost me completely...

He would count at least some of a worker's employer-paid insurance as taxable income.

In an effort to fund their massive projects, the government is constantly looking for ways to increase revenue through ridiculous taxes.....death by a thousand taxes imo.

revefsreleets
05-08-2008, 11:28 AM
We've had this discussion before.

You mean where you flip-flop, divert, project, attack, deny, ignore what doesn't suit your argument, flame bait and then you cap it all off by whining to the mods?

Indeed we have.

Dino 6 Rings
05-08-2008, 11:31 AM
How much money are we sending to Burma again?

How much money do we spend paying for illegals to use our health care system?

How much money are we spending on a bridge to no where again?

Yeah...I'm willing put my trust in the government when it comes to my health...

Jeremy
05-08-2008, 11:45 AM
In an effort to fund their massive projects, the government is constantly looking for ways to increase revenue through ridiculous taxes.....death by a thousand taxes imo.

Exactly. The government wanting to tax employer benefits is something you'd expect from the liberals. It's an idea that should cause the advocates of private industry to scream about big government intervention.

GBMelBlount
05-08-2008, 12:26 PM
I'm the first to admit our healthcare system isn't perfect. Nor do I know the "best" solution. I don't even know enough to compare McCain's proposal to Obama's or Hillary's at this point. I will probably vote for McCain but I won't know until I really look at things closer to the election. High taxes and excess/wasteful government spending are a big problem imo. Many of us work until almost June just to pay the government. That concerns me.