PDA

View Full Version : Two Steeler SB rings to be sold on Ebay


I-Want-Troy's-Hair
07-11-2008, 09:43 PM
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08193/896313-66.stm

Who wants to buy a Super Bowl ring?
Two of them from '70s Steelers to be sold on eBay
Friday, July 11, 2008
By Dan Majors, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Sweating through training camp, studying playbooks, pounding through practices, and then taking the weekly beatings that are part of life in the National Football League -- all this so that one day you can own a Super Bowl ring.

Or you can just go to eBay.

That's the game plan for some less-than-athletic types who are expected to bid for two Steelers Super Bowl rings going on the Internet auction block Monday.

Right now, the two rings -- given in the mid-1970s to a Steelers front-office employee after wins in Super Bowls IX and X -- are in a safe deposit box in a Mt. Lebanon bank. Part of a court-approved bankruptcy sale, they have been appraised at more than $10,000 each, according to Fred Fall, who has been appointed to oversee the liquidation.

"This ring is exactly as Joe Greene or Jack Ham's or any of the other players' rings," said Mr. Fall, of Fall Liquidation in Oakmont. "The only difference is that the name is different. It's a real, authentic Super Bowl ring."

The eBay listing will include each ring's size and weight and a detailed description. The name engraved on the side is that of the Steelers' employee who received them from the team.

"We didn't want to put the fellow's name in there because it's embarrassing," Mr. Fall said. "He's filed for bankruptcy, and he's lost the rings."

The rings are being auctioned separately.

The first one, commemorating the Steelers' Jan. 12, 1975, victory over the Minnesota Vikings, will be put up at 12:15 p.m. and taken down one week later. Manufactured by Jostens, it is made of 10-karat gold weighing 42.3 grams and has a single 1-carat modern-cut diamond. Listed in mint condition, it bears the words "Pittsburgh Steelers -- World Champions 1974" and the results of the team's three postseason games.

The auction for the other one, honoring the Steelers' Jan. 18, 1976, defeat of the Dallas Cowboys, begins at 12:45 p.m. and likewise ends a week later.

That ring, manufactured by Balfour, also is of 10K gold and weighs 36.7 grams. It has two half-carat diamonds, signifying the Steelers' second Super Bowl win, and an image of the Vince Lombardi Trophy awarded to the NFL champion. It's also in mint condition.

"The successful bidders would pay certified funds to the trustee and get the rings," Mr. Fall said.

A minimum bid of $1,000 is listed for each ring, and there is an unpublished reserve.

"It is something," said Mr. Fall, 55, a lifelong Steelers fan who had the rings photographed for sale on eBay. "I have to say, it was the first time I've handled an authentic championship ring of any kind."

Mr. Fall said the NFL and the Steelers have no prohibition against selling the rings. Once given to the player, coach or team employee, the ring becomes the property of the recipient.

This isn't the first time that Super Bowl rings have been sold. In 2000, for example, Lester Hayes, the former All-Pro cornerback of the Los Angeles Raiders, pawned his Super Bowl XVIII ring for $800. Before he could buy it back, the pawnshop put the ring up for auction on eBay, and within 24 hours the bidding was up to $11,000. That ring eventually went to an anonymous bidder for $18,200.

"But I don't think that eBay has seen many of these," Mr. Fall said. "There just aren't that many out there that are available."

A number of variables, naturally, will come into play with the sale.

"The rings are probably less valuable because it's a front office personnel rather than a player," Mr. Fall said.

Still, he anticipates a successful sale.

"There are Steelers fans all over the world. I think this is a very good way of getting the rings out there," he said. "And sports collectibles bring crazy money, because people like to own pieces of history, and this is a piece of history."

fansince'76
07-11-2008, 09:58 PM
I'm sure they'll sell, but for me personally, a big part of the cachet of a ring like that is that the person whose name is engraved on the ring was actually part of the team that won it. It seems to me the real meaning of the ring would be lost by buying it off of Ebay. At that point, it's no longer special - just an expensive piece of jewelry.

FordsnSteelers
07-12-2008, 01:14 AM
agreed. it has no real meaning if your name isnt on it.

Galax Steeler
07-12-2008, 03:55 AM
I would say that they will bring more then 10 thousand each but personally I wouldn't want one.

19ward86
07-12-2008, 09:12 AM
that is just terrible.

slashsteel
07-12-2008, 10:17 AM
Hell I want one, but it is a little out of my price range. :)

MDSteel15
07-12-2008, 07:41 PM
Whose on the rings?

cakmakli
07-13-2008, 08:00 AM
Does anyone know if they have sold yet? I can't find them on ebay. Does anyone have the link?

fansince'76
07-13-2008, 08:31 AM
Does anyone know if they have sold yet? I can't find them on ebay. Does anyone have the link?

They don't go on sale until tomorrow.

That's the game plan for some less-than-athletic types who are expected to bid for two Steelers Super Bowl rings going on the Internet auction block Monday.

Haiku_Dirtt
07-13-2008, 01:10 PM
I'm sure they'll sell, but for me personally, a big part of the cachet of a ring like that is that the person whose name is engraved on the ring was actually part of the team that won it. It seems to me the real meaning of the ring would be lost by buying it off of Ebay. At that point, it's no longer special - just an expensive piece of jewelry.

Couldn't agree more...although the temptation is there.

Part of me would like to see someone buy it and return to the original player. The other part of me wonders what kind of idiotic behavior led to his demise. You know. The strippers. The Hummers. Marrying the wrong gold digger.

SAD but true.

fansince'76
07-13-2008, 01:26 PM
Part of me would like to see someone buy it and return to the original player.

I was thinking the same thing, but I seriously doubt the buyer(s) would be that charitable.

stlrtruck
07-14-2008, 08:23 AM
I agree - It would be pretty awesome if someone bought them and just gave them back to the guy that earned them.

Mosca
07-14-2008, 08:59 AM
Part of me would like to see someone buy it and return to the original player. The other part of me wonders what kind of idiotic behavior led to his demise. You know. The strippers. The Hummers. Marrying the wrong gold digger.

SAD but true.

They did not belong to a player, but to a front-office employee.

the two rings -- given in the mid-1970s to a Steelers front-office employee after wins in Super Bowls IX and X

They are now part of a bankruptcy, as quoted in the original article. The most common cause of bankruptcy in the US is injury or accident. In this case we don't know what the cause is, but it is almost always outside of the control of the person declaring.

It is sad. But often, a crisis puts the value of possessions in stark relief; they are a luxury borne of comfort, of being enough above scrabbling for existence that you can hold them for more than their value. If the rings were returned, they would probably be resold.

fansince'76
07-14-2008, 05:36 PM
Here they are, but they couldn't get the years right? One's listed as "AUTHENTIC 1974 PITTSBURGH STEELERS SUPER BOWL RING - 1973 NFL Season," the other is listed as "AUTHENTIC 1975 PITTSBURGH STEELERS SUPER BOWL RING - 1974 NFL Season." I'm sure it was an honest mistake, but for 2 rings appraised at $10,000+ per, you'd think they'd get the details right.

Super Bowl IX Ring Auction (http://cgi.ebay.com/AUTHENTIC-1974-PITTSBURGH-STEELERS-SUPER-BOWL-RING_W0QQitemZ270254042728QQihZ017QQcategoryZ25211 QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem)

Super Bowl X Ring Auction (http://cgi.ebay.com/AUTHENTIC-1975-PITTSBURGH-STEELERS-SUPER-BOWL-RING_W0QQitemZ270254043855QQihZ017QQcategoryZ25211 QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem)

SteelersMongol
07-15-2008, 03:07 AM
Wow, finally a chance for a Bungal to own a SB ring. :laughing: But since both went over $14,000 already, a fellow Bungal first has to steal the money to buy them, huh.

Actually this sucks. Why would you want to give a front-office employee a ring, from the first place? :noidea:

Hey, guys, I don't know if anyone would wanna do it, but these days you could easily change a name on the ring. :wink02:

Galax Steeler
07-15-2008, 03:27 AM
Wow, finally a chance for a Bungal to own a SB ring. :laughing: But since both went over $14,000 already, a fellow Bungal first has to steal the money to buy them, huh. :

:toofunny: That will be the only way a bunhole will ever have one maybe they can all chip in an buy them and take turns wearing them.

stlrtruck
07-15-2008, 07:55 AM
Actually this sucks. Why would you want to give a front-office employee a ring, from the first place? :noidea:


After working in the Ticket Office of an NFL Franchise, I can say that the reason, IMHO, they hand rings to those in the office is because of the hard work, dedication, and selflessness it takes to make the operation go smoothly - trust me it's not a typical 9-5 type job.

SteelersMongol
07-15-2008, 09:28 PM
After working in the Ticket Office of an NFL Franchise, I can say that the reason, IMHO, they hand rings to those in the office is because of the hard work, dedication, and selflessness it takes to make the operation go smoothly - trust me it's not a typical 9-5 type job.

I'm sorry. Don't take this wrong way. I know it takes whole lot more than just the players going out there playing the games to win SB.

I was just trying to say only the coaching staff, players, and the owners should get ring. The rest could get something worthy. Money, or a plaque, or memorabilia, or something like that.

stlrtruck
07-16-2008, 08:06 AM
I'm sorry. Don't take this wrong way. I know it takes whole lot more than just the players going out there playing the games to win SB.

I was just trying to say only the coaching staff, players, and the owners should get ring. The rest could get something worthy. Money, or a plaque, or memorabilia, or something like that.

No offense taken. The office I worked at told me that when the team won the Super Bowl, the women had a choice between a ring or a pendant similar to value as the ring. But really think about it, if you were in an office that gave you the choice - which one would you take? Ring or Money?

One thing to consider is that the salaries of office persons are not that high, especially on the entry level.

fansince'76
07-16-2008, 08:16 AM
The office I worked at told me that when the team won the Super Bowl, the women had a choice between a ring or a pendant similar to value as the ring. But really think about it, if you were in an office that gave you the choice - which one would you take? Ring or Money?

Good question. Honestly, I think I would take the cash, especially if I was a lower level employee who probably isn't making all that much. I think Mongol has a point about only players and coaches getting rings. Think about it - 30 years after the fact, you're hosting a party at your house and conversation turns to the ring - "Wow, you were on a SB-winning team? What position did you play?" "I was a front office gofer for them that year." Not exactly the same as actually playing for the team, even as a bench warmer. However, I would imagine rings like that appreciate in value over time as well, so taking the cash now would not amount to as much as getting a ring, keeping it for 10-15 years and then selling it.

SteelMember
07-16-2008, 11:43 AM
Looks like these wil just be an expensive piece of fan memoribilia. I glad they didn't belong to a player. Even though they would be worth more, I'd hate to see anyone from our storied franchise fall on hard times and resort to pawning their ring. 52, a sad story.

KeiselPower99
07-16-2008, 01:12 PM
Didnt Joe Gilliam pawn his off for cheap??? Id love to have the extra cash to buy em.

stlrtruck
07-16-2008, 01:28 PM
Good question. Honestly, I think I would take the cash, especially if I was a lower level employee who probably isn't making all that much. I think Mongol has a point about only players and coaches getting rings. Think about it - 30 years after the fact, you're hosting a party at your house and conversation turns to the ring - "Wow, you were on a SB-winning team? What position did you play?" "I was a front office gofer for them that year." Not exactly the same as actually playing for the team, even as a bench warmer. However, I would imagine rings like that appreciate in value over time as well, so taking the cash now would not amount to as much as getting a ring, keeping it for 10-15 years and then selling it.

OH, I understand what Mongol and you are saying about only giving them to the players and coaches but think about it if you were the go'fer that year and your boss asks you, what's your ring size?