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View Full Version : Straight up BS!!!


xfl2001fan
08-05-2008, 06:31 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/football/nfl/specials/preview/2008/08/04/giants.ap/index.html

Why should an athlete receive special privileges? I am getting sick and tired of seeing their punishments delayed. God forbid I ever become a judge and have to try an athlete. I wouldn't care if it's mid-season, the perp would be punished immediately. Missing a few games/practices might actually teach athletes something.

stlrtruck
08-06-2008, 11:56 AM
I agree. He even said, "We have to learn from our mistakes and you have to pay for them." Really? Then why aren't you spending your entire time in jail?

I can't wait for one of this spoiled little brats to actually get a judge who doesn't give a dang what their career is and puts them in jail during the season!

Blitzburgh_Fever
08-06-2008, 12:36 PM
The other part of this is that Virginia messed up: if he hadn't been in the papers, he'd probably never have been tapped for his jail time. They screwed up, so they're offering some concessions. He could possibly take it to court and end up paying a fine (which is probably what Virginia wanted), and instead has opted for the 30 day jail time.

steelreserve
08-06-2008, 01:32 PM
Where is he receiving special treatment? There's absolutely nothing in that article that suggests they delayed his sentence on purpose. If anything, it sounds like it happened because the court system was inefficient.

Doesn't sound like he got off easy because he was a professional athlete, either. He had a couple of minor run-ins with the law and he went to jail like everyone else. If anything, I'd say that 30 days in jail is an unusually harsh punishment for underage drinking. Although that probably has to do with whatever probation he was on as a kid.

edit: I thought you meant that by delaying his sentence, you meant the part where he was just going to jail for something way back in 2004. If you meant the part where the second sentence was delayed until after this season, that's pretty standard practice for minor offenses, no matter what line of work you're in. Unless you committed a serious crime, they usually don't take you into custody straight from the courtroom. They tell you to report to jail on such-and-such a date, and they consider things like your job, family, medical conditions, and so on. So this is not out of line with what would happen to anyone else.

xfl2001fan
08-06-2008, 02:19 PM
They tell you to report to jail on such-and-such a date, and they consider things like your job, family, medical conditions, and so on. So this is not out of line with what would happen to anyone else.
*Cutting the whole portion down for the purpose of not having to re-read the whole thing over again*

I can only go on the experience my family has had with legal issues and all of them were sentenced immediately following court unless jail time had already been served. (Mostly it's been underage drinking, possession of contraband and a couple of domestics)

That being said, thank you for the note. It does make me feel better knowing that other people (outside of the rich and famous) are actually given a break now and then. Personally, I'm all for the "serve it NOW" style. Hit 'em hard and hit 'em fast, maybe they'll think twice about their stupidity. It's worked for most of my brothers and sisters...and it's certainly kept me out of jail seeing how their lives have been affected.

SteelCityMan786
08-06-2008, 02:34 PM
The other part of this is that Virginia messed up: if he hadn't been in the papers, he'd probably never have been tapped for his jail time. They screwed up, so they're offering some concessions. He could possibly take it to court and end up paying a fine (which is probably what Virginia wanted), and instead has opted for the 30 day jail time.

Virginia Traditionally is one of the toughest states in the legal system to.

RoethlisBURGHer
08-06-2008, 02:39 PM
I have a co-worker right now who is on a "work release" program where she is "released" to go to work, then after work she's taken back into "custody". She's also allowed to go do her errands after work as long as she gives the jail a time she's going to be back by.

I don't see this as anything different, except he has to do his scentance between seasons because he works in a place too far away with to much travel to do it the way my co-worker is doing hers.

stlrtruck
08-06-2008, 03:11 PM
I have a co-worker right now who is on a "work release" program where she is "released" to go to work, then after work she's taken back into "custody". She's also allowed to go do her errands after work as long as she gives the jail a time she's going to be back by.

I don't see this as anything different, except he has to do his scentance between seasons because he works in a place too far away with to much travel to do it the way my co-worker is doing hers.

Maybe because athletes usually get preferential treatment 98% (yes that's a made up statistic not meant to be factual) of the time. She also goes back every night after work - correct? Then why doesn't Bradshaw?

It seems that athletes live above the law and then judges allow the behavior to continue. Outside of Vick, name one player that has truly had to deal with his actions by going to jail as a normal person would if they created the same stupid moves?

RoethlisBURGHer
08-06-2008, 03:26 PM
Maybe because athletes usually get preferential treatment 98% (yes that's a made up statistic not meant to be factual) of the time. She also goes back every night after work - correct? Then why doesn't Bradshaw?

It seems that athletes live above the law and then judges allow the behavior to continue. Outside of Vick, name one player that has truly had to deal with his actions by going to jail as a normal person would if they created the same stupid moves?

Rae Carruth.

And why can't Bradshaw? Because he has to spend his jail time in a Virginia prison, but he works in New Jersey. Therefore, once the Giants season is over, he will be back in a Virginia jail cell serving the rest of his sentance.

stlrtruck
08-06-2008, 03:45 PM
Rae Carruth.

And why can't Bradshaw? Because he has to spend his jail time in a Virginia prison, but he works in New Jersey. Therefore, once the Giants season is over, he will be back in a Virginia jail cell serving the rest of his sentance.

I'm impressed. I completely forgot about his own personal demise and transition into an orange jumpsuit.

As for Bradshaw, if he's not around to be on work program, then why doesn't he have to serve his sentence now. While I admit that circumstances sometimes play part and a person's willingness to work with officers and the whole plea deal thing, at what point do people, specifically athletes start getting their fair share of, "TOO BAD SO SAD!"?

I guess I've tired of seeing athletes get away with things that a "typical" citizen would have the book thrown at them for.

ChronoCross
08-06-2008, 03:56 PM
lol.. They have allowed several players to get off..its nothing new

briandpoe
08-06-2008, 04:38 PM
"It doesn't matter if you're Joe the milkman, or whoever," said Bradshaw, speaking for the first time since training camp opened July 25. "Regardless of whether you go to the Super Bowl, or not, you've got to learn from your mistakes. You'll get punished for them."



and he said this because maybe he thought that by winning the super bowl he would get off???

Blitzburgh_Fever
08-06-2008, 05:27 PM
"It doesn't matter if you're Joe the milkman, or whoever," said Bradshaw, speaking for the first time since training camp opened July 25. "Regardless of whether you go to the Super Bowl, or not, you've got to learn from your mistakes. You'll get punished for them."



and he said this because maybe he thought that by winning the super bowl he would get off???

I think he's more saying it to set an example for kids that look up to him or other people, not saying "I went to the Super Bowl, I should be immune."

RoethlisBURGHer
08-06-2008, 06:08 PM
I'm impressed. I completely forgot about his own personal demise and transition into an orange jumpsuit.

As for Bradshaw, if he's not around to be on work program, then why doesn't he have to serve his sentence now. While I admit that circumstances sometimes play part and a person's willingness to work with officers and the whole plea deal thing, at what point do people, specifically athletes start getting their fair share of, "TOO BAD SO SAD!"?

I guess I've tired of seeing athletes get away with things that a "typical" citizen would have the book thrown at them for.

If he would have spelled his name Ray, he woulda gotten away with it.

I too am sick of seeing athletes getting slaps on the wrist and absolutley no punishment at all. I just don't see this as one of those times.

If anything, being a football player is a perk because he doesn't have to serve his sentance all at once. Instead of working a normal job Mon-Fri, he works out of New Jersey and only has to report to work for a few months.

But it's basicly the same thing as work-release. However, he doesn't get a break from jail to go to work, he has to sit there full-time when he's there.

stlrtruck
08-07-2008, 08:55 AM
But it's basicly the same thing as work-release. However, he doesn't get a break from jail to go to work, he has to sit there full-time when he's there.

I'd like to start seeing athletes serve their sentences in the here and now, not the distant future. If it were me, there would be no consideration of my job or the such - just a thrown into the jail cell to start my sentence. So let him start his sentence now, and when he's done serving time, then let him go back to his job - if they'll have him. Lord knows that my company may not take me back upon my release.

steelreserve
08-07-2008, 02:27 PM
That being said, thank you for the note. It does make me feel better knowing that other people (outside of the rich and famous) are actually given a break now and then. Personally, I'm all for the "serve it NOW" style. Hit 'em hard and hit 'em fast, maybe they'll think twice about their stupidity. It's worked for most of my brothers and sisters...and it's certainly kept me out of jail seeing how their lives have been affected.

Yeah, my fiancee's family in the Philadelphia area knew a guy who got busted for his second DUI and had to go to jail for 90 days. They actually let him out certain days to go to work, provided he was back at the jail by 5:30 p.m. Once in a while, they even let him go home on weekends (in exchange for adding those days to the end of his sentence). We got to house-sit for a couple months while he was locked up.

So there's a range of things they do for minor offenses -- I guess not everyone gets that lucky, but sometimes a judge will deem that as long as the person has to go to jail, that sucks enough to fit the crime, whether you have to go to jail right away or not.

briandpoe
08-08-2008, 11:41 AM
I think he's more saying it to set an example for kids that look up to him or other people, not saying "I went to the Super Bowl, I should be immune."


So you think he is an example setter?

xfl2001fan
08-08-2008, 11:51 AM
So you think he is an example setter?

That seems a like a loaded question. I think that what he was trying to say about Bradshaw was that (after screwing up) he sets a good example by taking his punishment like a man. He didn't try to avoid it. He admitted his mistake.

We all make mistakes. Some are bigger than others. This cat is at least willing to pay the consequences (instead of paying someone to get out of them). You don't get that often from our celebrities.

RoethlisBURGHer
08-08-2008, 06:03 PM
That seems a like a loaded question. I think that what he was trying to say about Bradshaw was that (after screwing up) he sets a good example by taking his punishment like a man. He didn't try to avoid it. He admitted his mistake.

We all make mistakes. Some are bigger than others. This cat is at least willing to pay the consequences (instead of paying someone to get out of them). You don't get that often from our celebrities.

That's true. He admits to his mistakes and takes the punishment given. He didn't try to weasel out or pay someone off to get off of a real punishment.