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GBMelBlount
08-30-2008, 01:50 PM
I hope this thread can be used by any our members who have served our country (and those wishing to express their gratitude) for whatever purpose you like. To tell us about who you are, where you served, stories or experiences you want to share,….or simply to let us know your name, rank or serial number.

It is because of your commitment and sacrifice that we have our precious freedom.

I’m not sure what direction this thread will take but consider it a blank canvas, OK?

Thank you for your service! :salute:

xfl2001fan
08-30-2008, 02:08 PM
Thank you for the thread.

I've been in the military for 11 years. I served 4 years Active Duty with the United States Navy.

In 1998, when the Embassies were being bombed in Africa, I was in the Med Sea. We lost out on half of our port calls to travel back to the Atlantic and along the Western Coast of Africa to provide relief.

In 2000, I was in the Med (again) when the USS Cole was bombed. As with '98, all of our Mid East port calls were canceled and we spent 57 consecutive days at sea (getting underway replenishment) waiting on our President to tell us to go to war.

I have served the last 7 years in the Army Reserves, having been mobilized in 2003 for the "start of the war" in Iraq. My unit was sent to Kuwait to setup and run an ASP (Ammunition Supply Point.) Was probably one of the easiest mobilizations that any of us over there had to endure. Sucked being gone from the family, but was an otherwise cake assignment.

Due to my civilian job (working for the Army Reserves) and a few volunteers, I've managed to not get sent overseas for a 4th time, though next year is a target year for my unit...meaning it'll be time to go very soon.

Yup, my bags are packed and ready to go. The only way I get delayed again from going is if I get accepted into Warrant Officer Candidate School, which is expected to happen sometime this fall. If I can finish up with all the schooling required for it before the mob, I'll go with my unit. If not, then I'll go with another once my schools are complete.

steveironcity
08-30-2008, 04:09 PM
I served form 98-04 in the Army, but never served in a warzone. War Vets are the true heroes. Not some athlete, or movie star.

stlrtruck
08-30-2008, 04:33 PM
Didn't serve long and it was a medical discharged unrelated to any action. I was in the Navy from 91-92, just over a year and a half.

While I served, I wave off those who try to put me in the same boat as those men and women who serve longer and in more dangerous times.

To those men and women, I stand and salute. And from the bottom of my heart I say GOD BLESS YOU AND THANK YOU FOR PROTECTING THIS COUNTRY AND MY FAMILY!

BIGBENFASTWILLIE
08-30-2008, 05:14 PM
I was in the Pennsylvania National Guard for 6 years.
I was sent to Iraq in 04' and received a medical discharge for loss of hearing in both ears.
I am now in my last year of college, with a major in elementary education.

TroysBadDawg
08-30-2008, 08:37 PM
I am not sure I could do another interview again but here is the link to it.

Link to interview at CowboysPride.net (http://www.cowboyspride.net/forum/showthread.php?t=42196)

For what it is worth, I would do it all over again.

steelwall
08-31-2008, 05:00 AM
Served in the 82nd Airborne for 6 years. Seen my first action in Afganistan. Was in forward Ops. Received a bronze star and a purple heart. Seen alot of terrible things that still haunt me today, however I am proud to have removed some terrorists from this world.

lamberts-lost-tooth
08-31-2008, 05:05 AM
My hat goes off and my heart goes out to my fellow Vets....You are all my brothers (and sisters) and we share a bond that some find very hard to understand.

I served as a Military Police officer for several years including a stint in Panama during Operation Just Cause...and in Iraq during the 1st Persian Gulf War.

We landed in Saudi in January of '91 and stayed in the Khobar Towers for 10 days. (The same towers that were attacked by terrorist in 1996). In those 10 days we had 14 SCUD missiles shot at our location..with all 14 of them being taken out by Patriot missle defense.

We moved up to Log-Base Minnesota near the Iraq/Saudi border and immediatly began "sweeps" of the desert. This consisted of 20 armed Humvees lining 1/2 mile from each other to cover a 10 mile area, and driving through specific areas to tell the local bedouin tribesman that they needed to move out of harms way. (..and also to check them out as potential informants and sympathizers)

On February 24, 1991 ( My Moms birthday) the Gulf War ground offensive began after six weeks of intensive bombing against Iraq and its armed forces,

By the end of the day, over 10,000 Iraqi troops were held as prisoners, and a U.S. air base had been established deep inside Iraq. We were so overwhelmed with the amount of prisoners that we had to process and transport, that my platoon didnt sleep for 3 days.

At one point we had set up a temporary camp and heard a loud explosion...looking up we saw a dust flume about 1/2 mile from us....then saw a second explosion about 1/4 mile away. The bad news was that the Iraqis were "walking" rounds in on us...the good news is that we were supported by a battalion of artillery and M.L.R.S. (Mulri-Launch Rocket System) They were able to trace the trajectory of the two round BACK to its original location and they let loose with about a 5 minute burst. The military iltelligence unit assigned to us told us later that a Warthog flew over the area soon after and couldnt even tell what had shot at us or how many there were shooting at us. All that was left was a BIG crater in the sand.

After less than four days, Kuwait was liberated, and a majority of Iraq's armed forces had either been destroyed, surrendered or retreated back into to Iraq. On February 28 we declared a cease-fire, but we still met small pockets of resistance. By this time we had been "loaned" out to the 14 armored Calvery regiment...one night we were standing in front of an abandoned box truck just outside camp when a small pickup drove by about 100 yards. We heard distinct rifle shots and what sounded like a ball-peen hammer hitting the truck. All the rounds missed us by about 3 yards and we gathered ourselves together enough to call in the dirtbags in the truck ...who were "dealt" with by a nearby British unit.

It was at this time also that we were getting REEEAAAALLL tired of baby-sitting prisoners. It seemed like everyday we would have several groups give themselves up and we had to search...process...seperate...feed...watch...and transport them to the rear. So one day near nightfall...we were very pleased to notice that we had no prisoners and wouldnt have to set up guard duty (Which meant that everyone could get a good nights sleep). Sure enough..up pulls a large dump truck with about 40 smiling Iraqi soldiers..all ready to give up and get a good meal. I looked at the other Sgt. on duty and instantly told the spokesman of the group that we "were not accepting prisoners" at the time...and that "we were closed". he looked at me like I was crazy and asked..."Your closed?"...I told him we were...but that we "opened" again in the morning and would be happy to take them prisoner at that time. he motioned for me to step aside and whispered.."You promise?"...I laughed and promised and he and his friends crawled back into the truck and left. The next morning bright and early...up pulls the truck...we process the prisoners..and immediatly transport them to the rear camp.

After all was said and done...only one hundred and twenty-five American soldiers were killed in the Persian Gulf War, with another 21 regarded as missing in action.

I returned home on Mothers Day and was met by an American public that treated us like heros. I cried more than once at the love and support that was shown us.

Just wanted to share some of my experience with you all.

LambertIsGod58
08-31-2008, 05:11 AM
True heroes come in different forms. Not athletes or celebrities.

steelwall
08-31-2008, 05:17 AM
I was part of one of the first Airborne attachments sent into Afganistan. Our first jump was supposed to be in an area with no hostiles. Hower intel was wrong, we recieved fire on the way down I was grazed twice, once in the heel and once in my chest. Was extremely blessed the wounds were not severe. We landed and immediately set up a perimeter. It was about 25 of us, as our mission at the time was to set up an outpost.

We faced about 75 Taliban and managed to push them back. We called in for air support and a C-130 gunship showed about 5 to 10 minutes later, and mowed down the remaining Taliban. I believe it was the first time they had encountered a C-130 gun ship. For those that don't know it rains down complete carnage.

lamberts-lost-tooth
08-31-2008, 05:24 AM
I was part of one of the first Airborne attachments sent into Afganistan. Our first jump was supposed to be in an area with no hostiles. Hower intel was wrong, we recieved fire on the way down I was grazed twice, once in the heel and once in my chest. Was extremely blessed the wounds were not severe. We landed and immediately set up a perimeter. It was about 25 of us, as our mission at the time was to set up an outpost.

We faced about 75 Taliban and managed to push them back. We called in for air support and a C-130 gunship showed about 5 to 10 minutes later, and mowed down the remaining Taliban. I believe it was the first time they had encountered a C-130 gun ship. For those that don't know it rains down complete carnage.

Very nice....saw a C-130 surgically remove a barracks off the face of the earth in Panama.

Thanks for sharing the experience!

steelwall
08-31-2008, 05:39 AM
Very nice....saw a C-130 surgically remove a barracks off the face of the earth in Panama.

Thanks for sharing the experience!


Thank you for sharing your story too. Yes watching a C-130 gunship circling and pounding the enemy, is the personification of "shock and awe" . In the right situation it can be one of the most devestating attack aircraft in our fleet. C-130 gunships were used alot during my tour, and many soilders owe there lives to that support, as many hostiles lost theirs to its unbelievable fire power. It's not the most sophisticated aircraft, in fact its really very simple, built for one thing rain down on the enemy, untill there is nothing left.

lamberts-lost-tooth
08-31-2008, 05:55 AM
Thank you for sharing your story too. Yes watching a C-130 gunship circling and pounding the enemy, is the personification of "shock and awe" . In the right situation it can be one of the most devestating attack aircraft in our fleet. C-130 gunships were used alot during my tour, and many soilders owe there lives to that support, as many hostiles lost theirs to its unbelievable fire power. It's not the most sophisticated aircraft, in fact its really very simple, built for one thing rain down on the enemy, untill there is nothing left.

I'm sure the Taliban have grown to fear the C-130's ..the same way the Iraqi's feared the Warthog...they called them the "Devils Cross'".

steelwall
08-31-2008, 06:06 AM
I'm sure the Taliban have grown to fear the C-130's ..the same way the Iraqi's feared the Warthog...they called them the "Devils Cross'".


Ironicly many Taliban called the C-130 gunship "the rain of terror".

GBMelBlount
08-31-2008, 06:41 PM
Served in the 82nd Airborne for 6 years. Seen my first action in Afganistan. Was in forward Ops. Received a bronze star and a purple heart. Seen alot of terrible things that still haunt me today, however I am proud to have removed some terrorists from this world.

Thank you for your service Jason. I have several friends, including my father, who are still dealing with the terrible things they experienced in the war. War is hell. My heart goes out to you my friend...

steelwall
08-31-2008, 07:21 PM
Thank you for your service Jason. I have several friends, including my father, who are still dealing with the terrible things they experienced in the war. War is hell. My heart goes out to you my friend...

Thank you Tom for creating this thread, I think I speak for a lot of veterans when I say that a simple "thank you" means alot to us.

steelersfanman92
08-31-2008, 08:38 PM
I just want to say thank you to everyone, it means so much to every American what you all have done

Hammer Of The GODS
09-01-2008, 12:05 AM
Well I don't really talk about the things I saw and experienced. I try to put those thought out of my head. I can deal with them during the day but if they are on my mind at night it's gonna be a bad night.
My wife (the sweetest woman alive) has had to "talk me down" from night terrors. I don't remember them the next day, but my wife tells me and then I realize how screwed up I am. The dreams are of events that took place in that wonderful sandbox over there. I wish she didn't know my "dark side" but it comes out when I can't control it, during my sleep. Enough of that crap......



I am no different than any other soldier who has put his/her ass on the line.
We all just want the same things. To serve our country with honor and KNOW that the sacrifice is not in vain.

Our government hasn't done squat to make me feel it was worth it! They are pissing away those sacrifices! I feel a rant coming on I better stop now!

I'll let Bob do my ranting.........
uGE-4WqCEw8&feature=user

This is how I get when I get going on all the things wrong in this country! GO BOB GO! :chuckle:


UNITED STATES MARINES SEMPER FI

Thanks for the thread Tom..........

steelwall
09-01-2008, 01:37 AM
Well I don't really talk about the things I saw and experienced. I try to put those thought out of my head. I can deal with them during the day but if they are on my mind at night it's gonna be a bad night.
My wife (the sweetest woman alive) has had to "talk me down" from night terrors. I don't remember them the next day, but my wife tells me and then I realize how screwed up I am. The dreams are of events that took place in that wonderful sandbox over there. I wish she didn't know my "dark side" but it comes out when I can't control it, during my sleep. Enough of that crap......



I am no different than any other soldier who has put his/her ass on the line.
We all just want the same things. To serve our country with honor and KNOW that the sacrifice is not in vain.

Our government hasn't done squat to make me feel it was worth it! They are pissing away those sacrifices! I feel a rant coming on I better stop now!

I'll let Bob do my ranting.........
uGE-4WqCEw8&feature=user

This is how I get when I get going on all the things wrong in this country! GO BOB GO! :chuckle:


UNITED STATES MARINES SEMPER FI

Thanks for the thread Tom..........




You are not alone....god bless my wife and her support of the "bad" things that I/we have to endure as a result of horrible visons that still haunt me. I too suffer from night terrors, waking up with my side of the bed soaking wet from sweat. Not to mention the times she has woken me up from a terrible nightmare.

I agree, the government has done sqwat to help us that suffer from this. I keep hoping it will just go away. Even still I feel that there must be some good out of this. Perhaps someone I toke out was the next 9/11 terrorist, who knows??

I applaud you for your honesty as I was reluctant to share the "dark side" of combat, but perhaps our sharing will help in some way. I solute you brother....

Hammer Of The GODS
09-01-2008, 11:08 AM
You are not alone....god bless my wife and her support of the "bad" things that I/we have to endure as a result of horrible visons that still haunt me. I too suffer from night terrors, waking up with my side of the bed soaking wet from sweat. Not to mention the times she has woken me up from a terrible nightmare.

I agree, the government has done sqwat to help us that suffer from this. I keep hoping it will just go away. Even still I feel that there must be some good out of this. Perhaps someone I toke out was the next 9/11 terrorist, who knows??

I applaud you for your honesty as I was reluctant to share the "dark side" of combat, but perhaps our sharing will help in some way. I solute you brother....


Man if civilians knew the "reality" of war, most of them would curl up into a ball in the corner! When you are trying to help your buddy after an explosion has burned amolst every scrap of his clothes off and his flesh is falling off as you try to pull him to safety and he's screaming in agony! That shit takes a toll on your mind. I can't get it out of my head. As bad as that memory is the memory of standing in his parents living room was almost as bad. Jasons last words were to tell his parents that he loved them and he was sorry he volunteered. I honored him by delivering that message. One of the hardest things I've ever had to do. It was months after Jason had died when I finally got back to the states. His mom fell apart when she saw me standing at the door. Jason and I came up through training together and we knew each others parents. His dad was a rock, a Viet Nam vet he just shook my hand gave me a hug and said " I'm glad you made it out son".

I'll never forget Jason and all the good times we had. RIP my friend.............

Havik
09-01-2008, 01:11 PM
I just wanted to say thanks to all Armed Forces veterans and those who are active at home and overseas for their service. You're the reason we live in a free country. To those in Iraq and Afghanistan, come home safe.

lamberts-lost-tooth
09-01-2008, 01:37 PM
Thank you Tom for creating this thread, I think I speak for a lot of veterans when I say that a simple "thank you" means alot to us.

Amen.

tony hipchest
09-01-2008, 03:22 PM
while definitely not a veteran, id like to express my gratitude to everyone who posted here.

there are 4 things i wanted to do with my life growing up. be a pro MLB player, and then NFL star. be a mortician, and finally a doctor. the war in the gulf inspired me to want to join the airforce (to pay for college) and become a field medic. while i was more into saving lives than taking them, i was always into artillery and felt i would have no problem taking up a piece and putting a bullet into the enemy.

having put most of my eggs into the ROTC, basket, once that fell through so did the last of my dreams.

but as an air force brat i grew up on the bases and as a contractor, the air force still pays my families bills.

at the time my grandpa got his final strip, he was the youngest man in the history of the air force to become chief mst sgt.

while in nam and the phillipines, he was in charge of loading all the body bags onto planes and shipping the fallen back to the states. he was offered a lucrative position in wahington, but after 23 years + the toll the war had taken he decided to retire.

my dad worked in the mx titan silos and then the spy sattelites. he would have to kill me if he told me what he actually did. after 20 years, he retired and now works for honeywell as a contractor for NASA who pilots a sattelite much like the one that takes all the google earth photos.

i have great appreciation for the military and all of my steeler bretheren (and others such as tbd) who were willing to put their life on the line for our country.

while i didnt enlist i was more than willing to sacrifice to try and save the lives of those who did. sometimes things just dont work out how you hope and dream.

props to all you folks. :cheers:

xfl2001fan
09-01-2008, 08:44 PM
Didn't serve long and it was a medical discharged unrelated to any action. I was in the Navy from 91-92, just over a year and a half.

While I served, I wave off those who try to put me in the same boat as those men and women who serve longer and in more dangerous times.

To those men and women, I stand and salute. And from the bottom of my heart I say GOD BLESS YOU AND THANK YOU FOR PROTECTING THIS COUNTRY AND MY FAMILY!

You're still as much a hero to me as many of my brothers and sisters that I serve with now and have served with in the past. You made the effort, and it's that very same effort that bought us our freedom.

lamberts-lost-tooth
09-02-2008, 06:31 AM
while definitely not a veteran, id like to express my gratitude to everyone who posted here.

there are 4 things i wanted to do with my life growing up. be a pro MLB player, and then NFL star. be a mortician, and finally a doctor. the war in the gulf inspired me to want to join the airforce (to pay for college) and become a field medic. while i was more into saving lives than taking them, i was always into artillery and felt i would have no problem taking up a piece and putting a bullet into the enemy.

having put most of my eggs into the ROTC, basket, once that fell through so did the last of my dreams.

but as an air force brat i grew up on the bases and as a contractor, the air force still pays my families bills.

at the time my grandpa got his final strip, he was the youngest man in the history of the air force to become chief mst sgt.

while in nam and the phillipines, he was in charge of loading all the body bags onto planes and shipping the fallen back to the states. he was offered a lucrative position in wahington, but after 23 years + the toll the war had taken he decided to retire.

my dad worked in the mx titan silos and then the spy sattelites. he would have to kill me if he told me what he actually did. after 20 years, he retired and now works for honeywell as a contractor for NASA who pilots a sattelite much like the one that takes all the google earth photos.

i have great appreciation for the military and all of my steeler bretheren (and others such as tbd) who were willing to put their life on the line for our country.

while i didnt enlist i was more than willing to sacrifice to try and save the lives of those who did. sometimes things just dont work out how you hope and dream.

props to all you folks. :cheers:

The desire and the ethics to be willing to fight for others freedom goes a long way Tony...Hats off for having your heart in the right place.:hatsoff:

pittsburghp8baller
09-02-2008, 08:53 AM
i have never served but i have the upmost respect and gratitude for all you guys have done my dad served in the first Iraq war and my mom is over there right now. i was to young to remember when my dad went and came back but from what i am told he really changed (something happened there, im not gonna get into details). its really wrong that all u people have to go over there do and see all of the stuff that u do and are expected to come back and fit in right away when that shouldnt be the case.

like i said i never served but i have lost a few friends in a untimely way and its really hard to shake

Dino 6 Rings
09-02-2008, 11:40 AM
Bootcamp at Fort Knox from Sept 92 - Dec 92 Echo 2-13. Clinton won the Election of 92 while I was in bootcamp. Originally told in bootcamp we were training to go to Bosnia/Serbia to fight. That changed after the election.

Served in Sweinfurt Germany at the Conn Barracks from 92 - 94 in Delta Company 2/64 and Delta 3/64 Armored Battalion. Switched Companies when 3/64 was deactivated during Clinton's time and moved over to 2/64. Was part of the 3rd Infantry Division, we were the Armored Attachment. I was a 19 Kilo Armored Crewman and had the priveledge of being a Loader, and Driver for an M1A2 Battle Tank.

Never saw any action, Got out in 94.

Roll the Rouge. Rock of the Marne.

steelwall
09-02-2008, 05:55 PM
Bootcamp at Fort Knox from Sept 92 - Dec 92 Echo 2-13. Clinton won the Election of 92 while I was in bootcamp. Originally told in bootcamp we were training to go to Bosnia/Serbia to fight. That changed after the election.

Served in Sweinfurt Germany at the Conn Barracks from 92 - 94 in Delta Company 2/64 and Delta 3/64 Armored Battalion. Switched Companies when 3/64 was deactivated during Clinton's time and moved over to 2/64. Was part of the 3rd Infantry Division, we were the Armored Attachment. I was a 19 Kilo Armored Crewman and had the priveledge of being a Loader, and Driver for an M1A2 Battle Tank.

Never saw any action, Got out in 94.

Roll the Rouge. Rock of the Marne.

Thats a bad mofo!!!

xfl2001fan
09-02-2008, 07:08 PM
I was a 19 Kilo Armored Crewman and had the priveledge of being a Loader, and Driver for an M1A2 Battle Tank.

Thats a bad mofo!!!:thumbsup::drink:

For the rest of you, steelwall's statement qualifies as a serious understatement.

steelwall
09-02-2008, 07:14 PM
:thumbsup::drink:

For the rest of you, steelwall's statement qualifies as a serious understatement.


Yes let me rephrase that..... That's the badest mofo.....

NJarhead
09-02-2008, 07:22 PM
I am not sure I could do another interview again but here is the link to it.

Link to interview at CowboysPride.net (http://www.cowboyspride.net/forum/showthread.php?t=42196)

For what it is worth, I would do it all over again.

.....I don't have the words, TBD. :drink:

Most of the time you hear about members of "the Greatest Generation" (WWII - and I believe them to be the greatest as well) lying about their age to enlist and fight, so good on ya for that one.

If Jane Fonda was on fire, I MIGHT consider trying to extinguish her with a wet chain..., maybe.

steelwall
09-02-2008, 07:30 PM
If Jane Fonda was on fire, I MIGHT consider trying to extinguish her with a wet chain..., maybe.

LMFAO..... Havent laughed that hard in a while.....:rofl:

NJarhead
09-02-2008, 07:44 PM
I was in the Marine recruiting office in August of 1990 trying to get to the desert as quick as possible. So finally in NOVEMBER I started my 13 weeks of hell at Parris Island South Carolina. By the time I graduated, finished Marine Combat Training, MOS School (Motor T) and found a home with II MEF (2nd Marine Expeditionary Force) at Camp Lejeune, the Gulf War was over. Came close to being the first in for the Haiti operation, but that got cancelled (for us). I was body guard/driver for the ops commander. I can probably still get from the air field to the Embassy with my eyes closed and I've never even been there (Training and studying the maps). Trained in Wisconsin and Norway and was also attached to the Hurricane Andrew humanitarian mission in South Florida. Met the Commandant (General Mundy), Colin Powell, the King of Norway and one Paul Simon while with the MEF. Stormin' Norman paid us a visit while in Norway, but I missed out on him as I was busy with a "dog and pony" for some Russian General.

As I was putting in an AA form (Request) to be attached to one of the MEU's (22, 24 or 26) and go on a MED float but I recieved orders to go to Iwakuni, Japan to "swing with the wing" for a year. Stayed there all but 45 days while we went to Thailand for "Operation Cobra Gold." Again, came close to going to war with the Koreans, but Former President Carter smoothed that one over and I was sent to Separations Co. at Camp Pendleton, CA. In the IRR I continued to drill while I attended college.

After 3 years of that, I got married and decided to go back in. This time with the Coast Guard to work on their civilian-like corporate jet. Got stationed in my home town for 2 years, went to AMT school then USCG AIRSTA Cape Cod, MA. While in the CG I directly saved three lives and participated in several counter drug operations, Home Land Security Patrols and operated in New York Harbor the week of 9/11. I had actually taken leave to come home, then volunteered at my former boat station where my best friend was a watch captain. I was on a 47' Motor Life Boat transporting fireman, equipment and doing what ever we could. Then we were commondeered by the secret service to provide security for the President.

With 10 years active duty under my belt, I opted to get out again. Today I work for the manufacturer of those same jets I worked on in the CG.

I never made it to any battle field. It wasn't for lack of trying, but I guess I was meant to serve more of a humanitarian purpose while in the uniform...., and I have no regrets about that...., except to say that my "superior" marksmanship skills were thus wasted. :wink02: Oh well.


Thanks to my friend GBMB for this thread. :drink:

NJarhead
09-02-2008, 07:48 PM
LMFAO..... Havent laughed that hard in a while.....:rofl:

That's one of the things ya gotta love about being in the service; meeting personalities from all over the place, and someone ALWAYS has one that you never heard before. :laughing:

I had a Gunny tell me that if I scribbled or wrote anything on his desk calendar again he would "Go off like a 155 (mm) in a laundry mat." :rofl: Gunny was a former drill instructor and a little anal.

GBMelBlount
09-02-2008, 07:49 PM
.....I don't have the words, TBD. :drink:

Most of the time you hear about members of "the Greatest Generation" (WWII - and I believe them to be the greatest as well) lying about their age to enlist and fight, so good on ya for that one.

If Jane Fonda was on fire, I MIGHT consider trying to extinguish her with a wet chain..., maybe.

Thanks for reading that Warden. I love Steve to death. It hurts like hell to know what things Steve and so many others here have suffered and experienced. Knowing Steve as a dear friend is one of the reasons I try to NEVER judge anyone as I have never walked in their shoes.....God bless you Steve, and thank you for your service. :hug:

xfl2001fan
09-02-2008, 09:00 PM
As I was putting in an AA form (Request) to be attached to one of the MEU's (22, 24 or 26) and go on a MED float but I recieved orders to go to Iwakuni, Japan to "swing with the wing" for a year.

During my Navy day, I was a part of the AMPHIB Navy. Did both Sea Tours on the Ampibious Assault Ship: USS Saipan LHA-2 (Leaving Home Again 2-morrow).

We were one of the ships used to test the V-22 Osprey (HATE that freaking plane) and I believe my tours were with the 20 MEU in 98 and the 22 MEU in 2000. I remember the 22 MEU, because I was the POOW when the 22 MEU commander (some Marine COL) crossed our quarterdeck for the first time. I ended up with his coin later on during the float for the help given to my Green Brothers and Sisters.

The expediters had to go through the S-6 shop for all of the needs of the various flight squadrons. I had kept a notebook from my first MED float of all the NSN's that were particularly popular (Gerbers, Multi-Tools, Flight Jackets, Flight Bags, Flight Jerseys, Coveralls and Boots to name the basics) and was able to direct everyone to all the right people. In return, my job as an Aviation Storekeeper was much much easier, because I had access to a few more bodies and to a few more shops to track parts and move larger items (like Cobra Blades) that had to be hand carried to the flight deck. (Too long to be transported up the ramps by forklift...and during flight operations, they wouldn't lower the "elevator.")

I don't miss the high OPTEMPO of being AMPHIB (because I hate being gone from my family) but loved the atmosphere when I was gone.

One of my favorite memories was the day that "Gunny" called me Devil-Squid (kicked his arse in wrestling match in the shop...forgot to tell him that during the off hours for my 98 float and most of my second were spent in the gym or on the mat with the grunts.)

Preacher
09-02-2008, 09:28 PM
Thank you to you all.

Regardless of party affiliation, football team support, or anything else,

you have my UTMOST appreciation. :hatsoff:

NJarhead
09-02-2008, 09:40 PM
During my Navy day, I was a part of the AMPHIB Navy. Did both Sea Tours on the Ampibious Assault Ship: USS Saipan LHA-2 (Leaving Home Again 2-morrow).

We were one of the ships used to test the V-22 Osprey (HATE that freaking plane) and I believe my tours were with the 20 MEU in 98 and the 22 MEU in 2000. I remember the 22 MEU, because I was the POOW when the 22 MEU commander (some Marine COL) crossed our quarterdeck for the first time. I ended up with his coin later on during the float for the help given to my Green Brothers and Sisters.

The expediters had to go through the S-6 shop for all of the needs of the various flight squadrons. I had kept a notebook from my first MED float of all the NSN's that were particularly popular (Gerbers, Multi-Tools, Flight Jackets, Flight Bags, Flight Jerseys, Coveralls and Boots to name the basics) and was able to direct everyone to all the right people. In return, my job as an Aviation Storekeeper was much much easier, because I had access to a few more bodies and to a few more shops to track parts and move larger items (like Cobra Blades) that had to be hand carried to the flight deck. (Too long to be transported up the ramps by forklift...and during flight operations, they wouldn't lower the "elevator.")

I don't miss the high OPTEMPO of being AMPHIB (because I hate being gone from my family) but loved the atmosphere when I was gone.

One of my favorite memories was the day that "Gunny" called me Devil-Squid (kicked his arse in wrestling match in the shop...forgot to tell him that during the off hours for my 98 float and most of my second were spent in the gym or on the mat with the grunts.)

:laughing: "Devil Squid." I like that.

I'm not sure 20 MEU is an actual unit. 22, 24 and 26 are East Coast (Camp Lejeune) and 21, 23 and 25 (I believe) are West Coast (Camp Pendleton).

Supply, IMHO, is a good job to have in the military. Somebody always needs to be "hooked up", and there can be lots of favors owed. Being in Motor T, everyone always wanted a ride. I got right along with the supply folks: I never wanted for much and they managed to get back to the barracks for showers when we were in the field. :wink02:

steelwall
09-02-2008, 10:30 PM
You guys may not believe it but on my soul it's true. Tomorrow I go to another city here in China to act in a TV series as a soilder. I'll be sure to get some pics. Weird huh?

lamberts-lost-tooth
09-03-2008, 08:37 AM
You guys may not believe it but on my soul it's true. Tomorrow I go to another city here in China to act in a TV series as a soilder. I'll be sure to get some pics. Weird huh?

That is too cool...does it pay well?...and are you the "Bad Guy"?

Dino 6 Rings
09-03-2008, 08:43 AM
That is too cool...does it pay well?...and are you the "Bad Guy"?

LOL! The Bad Guy!

btw...GO ARMY BEAT NAVY!!!

some day...some day...

xfl2001fan
09-03-2008, 10:41 AM
:laughing: "Devil Squid." I like that.

I'm not sure 20 MEU is an actual unit. 22, 24 and 26 are East Coast (Camp Lejeune) and 21, 23 and 25 (I believe) are West Coast (Camp Pendleton).

Supply, IMHO, is a good job to have in the military. Somebody always needs to be "hooked up", and there can be lots of favors owed. Being in Motor T, everyone always wanted a ride. I got right along with the supply folks: I never wanted for much and they managed to get back to the barracks for showers when we were in the field. :wink02:

Maybe it was the 24 MEU in 98 then. That one I don't remember as well because I had just joined the ship and spent most of my first tour on KP duty. That'll mess up a float fast! LOL

Both my tours were MED floats, so we hit up Marines from Lejeune and picked up some squadrons from Cherry Point (I believe that's a different base but close by???)

The week we spent in Puerto Rico was very nice! Bacardi factory, San Juan (all the Hooters girls were calendar worthy)...AYE DE MI!!!!

xfl2001fan
09-03-2008, 10:41 AM
You guys may not believe it but on my soul it's true. Tomorrow I go to another city here in China to act in a TV series as a soilder. I'll be sure to get some pics. Weird huh?

Sounds like a blast bro! Have fun.

Despite the fact that I've spent nearly 8 years in the Army (double my Naval time) still go with Navy during the football season. In my office, I have a few old pics of some Amphip ships hung up and a Navy ball cap as well. My coffee cup has Navy's newest logo:

Steel Ships, Iron Men with a sweet pick of the ESWS (Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist) device.

I'll see if I can find a pic of what it looks like and maybe add it to my sig.

GBMelBlount
09-03-2008, 06:05 PM
Someone e-mailed this to me a while back. I believe it was created by a teenage girl as a tribute to those who serve our country. Very touching.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ervaMPt4Ha0

Mods, if you don't mind helping me with this...thanks.

NJarhead
09-03-2008, 06:26 PM
Maybe it was the 24 MEU in 98 then. That one I don't remember as well because I had just joined the ship and spent most of my first tour on KP duty. That'll mess up a float fast! LOL

Both my tours were MED floats, so we hit up Marines from Lejeune and picked up some squadrons from Cherry Point (I believe that's a different base but close by???)

The week we spent in Puerto Rico was very nice! Bacardi factory, San Juan (all the Hooters girls were calendar worthy)...AYE DE MI!!!!

Cherry Point is in Havelock, NC (Moorehead City area) about 45 mins North of Camp Lejeune (Jacksonville, NC).

The MEU's do a lot of the cool stuff. Although, I did get to train with Force Recon via SOTG (Special Operations Training Group). Real SOCOM shit there. They fell under us as the senior unit on base. Lots of fun - sleep during the day, cause hate and discontent after dark. :thumbsup:

xfl2001fan
09-03-2008, 06:44 PM
Cherry Point is in Havelock, NC (Moorehead City area) about 45 mins North of Camp Lejeune (Jacksonville, NC).

The MEU's do a lot of the cool stuff. Although, I did get to train with Force Recon via SOTG (Special Operations Training Group). Real SOCOM shit there. They fell under us as the senior unit on base. Lots of fun - sleep during the day, cause hate and discontent after dark. :thumbsup:

Right on, by Ship's standards, that 45 minutes is much closer. :D Having never had to drive it, all I had to go on was a fading memory.

During both tours, we had SEALS on board and during 2000, Green Berets, SEALS and whatever Air Force Special Ops is had a joint exercise. Those guys were so cool to talk to and hang out with. Learned some other hand to hand tips from them (how to break certain choke holds and stuff).

If I was single when my 4 years was up, I'd probably still be involved in the Amphib Navy looking for either Med Floats or hanging out in the PACFLEET and taking on the Philipines, Australia, Hawaii, etc...

But that lifestyle is so not conducive with a family lifestyle.

NJarhead
09-03-2008, 06:58 PM
Right on, by Ship's standards, that 45 minutes is much closer. :D Having never had to drive it, all I had to go on was a fading memory.

During both tours, we had SEALS on board and during 2000, Green Berets, SEALS and whatever Air Force Special Ops is had a joint exercise. Those guys were so cool to talk to and hang out with.

The Air Force guys are Para-Rescue Jumpers (PJ's) I believe. From what I hear it's a very long and tough school.

Learned some other hand to hand tips from them (how to break certain choke holds and stuff).

If I was single when my 4 years was up, I'd probably still be involved in the Amphib Navy looking for either Med Floats or hanging out in the PACFLEET and taking on the Philipines, Australia, Hawaii, etc...

But that lifestyle is so not conducive with a family lifestyle.

I gave serious thought to applying myself to physical fitness and trying out for the SEALS but I figured if I did it (made it) I'd want to do it forever, but I also wanted to have a family.

When I was deciding whether or not to stay in in '94, you had to have a "B" billet to make a career of the Corps (I think it's 2 "B" billets now). Most people immediately consider becoming a Drill Instructor (as did I), but I was researching MSG (Marine Security Guard - Embassy Duty). I had heard some really great stories from Marines who had done it. I was sooooooo freaking close to doing it too. In the end I decided to start using my G.I. Bill instead.

One of the biggest mistakes I ever made was NOT going to Hawaii for 30 days on leave while I was in Japan. Get this: My best friend from home was stationed at K Bay, I had 30 days on the books and all I had to do was catch a MAC flight. So what does brain-child do???? Just sold my leave back for chump change..... and I STILL haven't been to F'ing Hawaii!!! :laughing:

I actually learned some good/non-lethal stuff in the Coast Guard believe it or not. Quick take downs and "compliance persuading techniques." :wink02:

xfl2001fan
09-03-2008, 07:07 PM
I gave serious thought to applying myself to physical fitness and trying out for the SEALS but I figured if I did it (made it) I'd want to do it forever, but I also wanted to have a family.

When I was deciding whether or not to stay in in '94, you had to have a "B" billet to make a career of the Corps (I think it's 2 "B" billets now). Most people immediately consider becoming a Drill Instructor (as did I), but I was researching MSG (Marine Security Guard - Embassy Duty). I had heard some really great stories from Marines who had done it. I was sooooooo freaking close to doing it too. In the end I decided to start using my G.I. Bill instead.

One of the biggest mistakes I ever made was NOT going to Hawaii for 30 days on leave while I was in Japan. Get this: My best friend from home was stationed at K Bay, I had 30 days on the books and all I had to do was catch a MAC flight. So what does brain-child do???? Just sold my leave back for chump change..... and I STILL haven't been to F'ing Hawaii!!! :laughing:

I actually learned some good/non-lethal stuff in the Coast Guard believe it or not. Quick take downs and "compliance persuading techniques." :wink02:

Embassy duty may have landed you in Africa...in which case, 98 was a bad year for Marines on that duty.

I was fortunate enough that when I left, I had been advised that selling leave is absolutely worthless. You lose out on all the BAH and what not that you would normally get. Sorry bout your luck man. :doh:

My unit sent me to MAC (Modern Army Combatives) and I am now an instructor for the level one stuff. Basically simple Gracie style Jiu-Jitsu (basics). I'm hoping to get to the Level 2 stuff in November. It's two weeks of getting your arse-kicked, but you learn much more advanced ground work and beginner strikes.

I'll decide later if I want to go to Level 3 (which is one month long).

NJarhead
09-03-2008, 07:24 PM
Embassy duty may have landed you in Africa...in which case, 98 was a bad year for Marines on that duty.

I was fortunate enough that when I left, I had been advised that selling leave is absolutely worthless. You lose out on all the BAH and what not that you would normally get. Sorry bout your luck man. :doh:

My unit sent me to MAC (Modern Army Combatives) and I am now an instructor for the level one stuff. Basically simple Gracie style Jiu-Jitsu (basics). I'm hoping to get to the Level 2 stuff in November. It's two weeks of getting your arse-kicked, but you learn much more advanced ground work and beginner strikes.

I'll decide later if I want to go to Level 3 (which is one month long).

Hell yeah! Let them send you to as many schools as you can get.

xfl2001fan
09-03-2008, 07:26 PM
Hell yeah! Let them send you to as many schools as you can get.
Prepping for Warrant Officer school right now. I'll go through L2, but don't know that they'll allow me to go through L3 as a Warrant.

NJarhead
09-03-2008, 08:17 PM
Prepping for Warrant Officer school right now. I'll go through L2, but don't know that they'll allow me to go through L3 as a Warrant.

Hmm. What are you going to do as a WO?

xfl2001fan
09-03-2008, 08:25 PM
Property Book Technician
(Supply Guru)

NJarhead
09-03-2008, 08:37 PM
Property Book Technician
(Supply Guru)

I guess it just depends on whether or not you end up in a HQ unit then. They usually get extra billets just for farts and grins (there again, almost go to go to jump school but got bumped for a senior guy. There was no reason for me or him to go..., just had an opening). Anyway, even if you don't get to do that I'm sure there are other opportunities/quals you can finagle your way into. :wink02:

BTW - Good for you on deciding to do warrant. The retirement is significantly better from what I remember. :drink:

xfl2001fan
09-03-2008, 08:46 PM
A WO1 makes (roughly) E7 pay, and it only goes up from there. So yeah, odds are pretty good my retirement pay will improve significantly by going this route.

All PBO's end up in at least a BN staff if not Brigade or higher. So yea, the rest of my career is either HQ or teaching schools. No big deal though as I've spent my entire army career at the BDE level.

steelwall
09-04-2008, 09:05 AM
Did the job today, it's late now, I'll try to get a couple pics up tomorrow. I was a British private...uhh...talk about a slap in the face. Not the British part. Least they could have given me seargant stripes.


Yes I was the bad guy. Basiclly my part was to keep 2 Chinese soldiers out of a British military hospitol in Hong Kong (takes place in the 70's) I turned them away the first scene, but of course the next scene they came back with the proper paper work and I had to allow them in.

It was funny though, the first scene I was all in the Chinese guys face telling him to get the hell outta here.

xfl2001fan
09-04-2008, 11:58 AM
Nice! Well, not about the "Private" ranking, but the role itself.

Any chance of us seeing you in action either via online site or through conventional (TV/Cinematic) methods?

NJarhead
09-04-2008, 04:02 PM
Did the job today, it's late now, I'll try to get a couple pics up tomorrow. I was a British private...uhh...talk about a slap in the face. Not the British part. Least they could have given me seargant stripes.


Yes I was the bad guy. Basiclly my part was to keep 2 Chinese soldiers out of a British military hospitol in Hong Kong (takes place in the 70's) I turned them away the first scene, but of course the next scene they came back with the proper paper work and I had to allow them in.

It was funny though, the first scene I was all in the Chinese guys face telling him to get the hell outta here.

BOOT :laughing: :wink02:

steelwall
09-05-2008, 08:04 AM
http://www.east2westconnections.biz/sitebuilder/images/commercial_in_Shunde_003-301x405.jpg

http://www.east2westconnections.biz/sitebuilder/images/commercial_in_Shunde_005-278x376.jpg

Heres a couple.

steelwall
09-05-2008, 08:05 AM
Nice! Well, not about the "Private" ranking, but the role itself.

Any chance of us seeing you in action either via online site or through conventional (TV/Cinematic) methods?


Will see if I can get a copy of the dvd and put it on youtube.

NJarhead
09-17-2008, 03:38 PM
There are heros and then there are, well, there is Mr Freeman.

http://www.229thavbn.com/EdFreeman2.jpg


Ed Freeman

You're an 18 or 19 year old kid. You're critically wounded, and dying in the jungle in the Ia Drang Valley, 11-14-1965. LZ Xray, Vietnam. Your Infantry Unit is outnumbered 8 - 1, and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 or 200 yards away, that your own Infantry Commander has ordered the MediVac helicopters to stop coming in.

You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns, and you know you're not getting out. Your family is 1/2 way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again. As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then, over the machine gun noise, you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter, and you look up to see a Huey, but it doesn't seem real, because no Medi-Vac markings are on it.

Ed Freeman is coming for you. He's not Medi-Vac, so it's not his job, but he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire, after the Medi-Vacs were ordered not to come.

He's coming anyway.

And he drops it in, and sits there in the machine gun fire, as they load 2 or 3 of you on board.

Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire, to the Doctors and Nurses.

And, he kept coming back...... 13 more times..... and took about 30 of you and your buddies out, who would never have gotten out.

Medal of Honor Recipient Ed Freeman died last Wednesday at the age of 80, in Boise, ID......

May God rest his soul.....



Actually, I think he flew in about 20 times.

NJarhead
09-17-2008, 06:45 PM
This needs a "Bump"

GBMelBlount
09-17-2008, 07:39 PM
There are heros and then there are, well, there is Mr Freeman.

http://www.229thavbn.com/EdFreeman2.jpg


Ed Freeman

You're an 18 or 19 year old kid. You're critically wounded, and dying in the jungle in the Ia Drang Valley, 11-14-1965. LZ Xray, Vietnam. Your Infantry Unit is outnumbered 8 - 1, and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 or 200 yards away, that your own Infantry Commander has ordered the MediVac helicopters to stop coming in.

You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns, and you know you're not getting out. Your family is 1/2 way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again. As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then, over the machine gun noise, you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter, and you look up to see a Huey, but it doesn't seem real, because no Medi-Vac markings are on it.

Ed Freeman is coming for you. He's not Medi-Vac, so it's not his job, but he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire, after the Medi-Vacs were ordered not to come.

He's coming anyway.

And he drops it in, and sits there in the machine gun fire, as they load 2 or 3 of you on board.

Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire, to the Doctors and Nurses.

And, he kept coming back...... 13 more times..... and took about 30 of you and your buddies out, who would never have gotten out.

Medal of Honor Recipient Ed Freeman died last Wednesday at the age of 80, in Boise, ID......

May God rest his soul.....



Actually, I think he flew in about 20 times.

Wow. Thanks for sharing Warden86. What an amazingly courageous man. God rest his soul, indeed. :salute:

Polamalu Princess
09-17-2008, 08:27 PM
This needs a "Bump"

AMEN!!! Thank God we have people that are fighting for our freedom. God bless our Vets and our active military. Thank you.

stlrtruck
09-18-2008, 10:11 AM
And we wonder where all the heroes have gone.

They aren't athletes or rich people, they're the every day people that do extraordinary things in the face of danger and their own life.

God Bless those Heroes - past and present!!

lamberts-lost-tooth
09-21-2008, 05:08 AM
This urban jungle is home now for me
But my hearts with my boys...And always will be
We all returned to our jobs, our homes and our farms
But the young man in me still burns
To be brothers in arms

Through the blood and the mud and the enemy fire
I've never again felt my emotions run higher
And though the dreams still wake me In fear and alarm
The young man in me still thinks of
My brothers in arms

The strength of my arm, and the speed of my feet
are now constant reminders that youths short and sweet.
But for us who stood between others and harm.
The memories stay alert, young and strong....

Dont they?....My brothers in arms

Hines0wnz
10-11-2008, 12:03 AM
I served in the Navy from 91-01 (Bush to Bush!) on an amphib (El Paso LKA-117) and destroyer (John Hanprofanityfilterprofanityfilterprofanityfilterpr ofanityfilter DD-981). My job was a firecontrolman which means I got to work on the ship's weapons systems. The system I specialized on was the anti-ship missile Phalanx Close-In-Weapons-System which, if you dont know, fires 20mm rounds out of a gatling gun at anywhere from 3000 to 4500 rounds per minute to kill the incoming. Although I got to test fire it often, I never had to fire it for real. That is good because CIWS is the last defense of the ship.

I was in Somalia (literally at the Mogadishu airport) to catch the El Paso in the summer of 1993. As we all remember, a couple months later is when the "blackhawk down" incident occurred. I got to ride a hovercraft from the airport out to rendezvous with the ships in the ARG (Amphibious Ready Group). That first night, some idiot tried to shoot an RPG at us from shore so went darken ship to not give them such an obvious target in case he got lucky.

A few years later I transferred to Jacksonville, FL and to the John Hanprofanityfilterprofanityfilterprofanityfilterpr ofanityfilter. We did some drug interdiction cruises in the Caribbean/Gulf of Mexico and stopped some cocaine from being smuggled in. One night in particular we chased down, caught and arrested some smugglers trying to get away. Some of my friends were actually on the ship's force that babysat these folks until the Coast Guard came and got them.

I appreciate everyone who has served before me which includes my grandfather in WWII, father in Viet Nam, cousin in the first Gulf War and everyone on this board as well. I'm glad to see some fellow vets around these parts which makes this board that much better.

steelwall
10-11-2008, 12:29 AM
Let me tell you guys I seen some of the bravest men in this world in Afganistan. I did things that now I think......what the F was I thinking... In battel your true self comes out. You can do amazing things. I know we have alot of atheists on this board

And this is by no means a jab at any of you, but god saved me more than once in Afgan. As I may have mentioned I was hit twice on my first jump, both times I was grazed, but theres, not much more of a helpless feeling than taking fire on the way down to the ground in a parachute.

For all you that want to know, when we did land we wiped the F'n floor with those scum bags.

Reading things like the man who toke his chopper into a hot zone makes me so proud of my people. Regardless of your political affiliation respect our vets, for god sakes some of them paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

Hines0wnz
10-13-2008, 05:51 PM
My ship's name got filtered?


It's the name of an original American patriot!!! :rofl:

GBMelBlount
10-13-2008, 06:33 PM
And we wonder where all the heroes have gone.

They aren't athletes or rich people, they're the every day people that do extraordinary things in the face of danger and their own life.

God Bless those Heroes - past and present!!

Amen.

Dino 6 Rings
10-14-2008, 09:57 AM
There are heros and then there are, well, there is Mr Freeman.

http://www.229thavbn.com/EdFreeman2.jpg


Ed Freeman

You're an 18 or 19 year old kid. You're critically wounded, and dying in the jungle in the Ia Drang Valley, 11-14-1965. LZ Xray, Vietnam. Your Infantry Unit is outnumbered 8 - 1, and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 or 200 yards away, that your own Infantry Commander has ordered the MediVac helicopters to stop coming in.

You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns, and you know you're not getting out. Your family is 1/2 way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again. As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then, over the machine gun noise, you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter, and you look up to see a Huey, but it doesn't seem real, because no Medi-Vac markings are on it.

Ed Freeman is coming for you. He's not Medi-Vac, so it's not his job, but he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire, after the Medi-Vacs were ordered not to come.

He's coming anyway.

And he drops it in, and sits there in the machine gun fire, as they load 2 or 3 of you on board.

Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire, to the Doctors and Nurses.

And, he kept coming back...... 13 more times..... and took about 30 of you and your buddies out, who would never have gotten out.

Medal of Honor Recipient Ed Freeman died last Wednesday at the age of 80, in Boise, ID......

May God rest his soul.....



Actually, I think he flew in about 20 times.

God Bless Our Soldiers.

All of them.

SCSTILLER
10-17-2008, 07:58 AM
Thanks to all of you who have and are serving!

As for me, I am a 13 year vet of the Air Force. I have been to both locations. My heart goes out to the guys and gals with their boots on the ground. I was a flyer, but now I am an instructor, but hope to go back to flying soon. Miss it!

Cannot really talk about what I did too much, but I am proud that I did it and am still doing it.

God Bless all our veterans, past, present, and future!

NJarhead
10-17-2008, 12:09 PM
Beirut Barracks Bombing Remembered
October 17, 2008
American Forces Press Service
TRIANGLE, Va. – With the 25th anniversary of the terrorist bombing of the Marine Corps barracks in Beirut just six days away, the National Museum of the Marine Corps has unveiled a temporary exhibit in memory of the 238 U.S. Marines who were killed that day.

“This remains the single most deadly attack on Americans on foreign soil – ever. In this post-9/11 world … this event should be remembered and studied by us all,” said Lin Ezell, director of the museum located just outside of Quantico Marine Corps Base.

“Historians tracking the global war on terrorism will find that it is a quarter century old,” Ezell told a small group of military veterans and museum visitors at the opening of the exhibit.

In the Oct. 23, 1983, attack, a terrorist driving a bomb-laden truck struck the headquarters of Battalion Landing Team 1, 8th Marines, killing 241 Americans, including 238 Marines. Moments later, 58 French paratroopers died in a similar truck-bomb attack.

The exhibit, which consists of a three-panel story board that chronicles the Marines’ peacekeeping mission from August 1982 through February 1984, is titled “Where Do We Get Such Men?”

The title is taken from the text of Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Paul X. Kelley’s welcome to the Marines and sailors who survived the bombing and returned to Camp Lejeune, N.C.:

“When I met the first flight of your fallen comrades as they arrived at Dover, Delaware, after the mass murder of 23 October, I asked the question, Lord, where do we get such men? As you stand here today I ask the same question. Where do we get such men of courage -- such men of dedication -- such men of patriotism -- such men of pride? The simple answer is that we get them from every clime and place, from every race, from every creed, and from every color.”

The exhibit, the first in a series of mini-exhibits, will be available to the public via an electronic library in 2009, Ezell said.

More than a half dozen Marines and sailors who were in Beirut the day of the barracks bombing attended the ceremony at the museum.

Michael N. Pocalyko, managing director and chief executive officer of Monticello Capital, was a young Navy pilot at the time of the bombing. He was airborne at the time, flying a helicopter on an intelligence mission about 25 miles north of Beirut. He found out about the bombing upon his return to his ship.

“My journal that day talks about the dead. So many dead at this time, so many dead at that time, and the numbers just kept going up,” Pocalyko said. “It was outside of anyone’s expectations that a suicide bombing would occur.”

Later, Pocalyko would attend Harvard University and study the international events that pre-dated the bombing as part of his studies on international affairs and economics.

Pocalyko returned to Beirut years later. “The Marine deployment area is now part of the Beirut airport,” he recalled. “The actual site is now part building and part parking lot. It’s nothing like it was.”

Navy Master Chief Petty Officer Mark T. Hacala, who still serves in the reserves, was a medical corpsman on the day of the bombing. Hacala, director of history and education at the U.S. Navy Memorial, said the exhibit highlighted what to some is a forgotten portion of history.

“What people don’t realize is that there was a ground war going on. The bombing is one element,” Hacala said. “To the rest of the world, it was an incident without context.”

Gregory Balzer, chief of operations for the Marine Corps’ training and education command, had left the Marine barracks one day before the bombing to go to the presidential palace, located a few miles away.

“I woke up to the loudest noise you ever heard. Then I heard a second explosion,” Balzer recalled.

Initially, he feared the palace was under attack. Then came the reports of mass casualties at the barracks. TV reports brought home the devastation visually.

“There’s so much activity in coordinating the evacuation, you go on auto-pilot. You’re just sort of numb,” Balzer said.

Then, the realization hits home, hard. “You’ve just lost every friend you have made in your short Marine Corps career,” Balzer said. “Not a day goes by that I don’t think about them.”

As for the exhibit, Balzer said it is recognition that is long overdue.

“It was a tragic defeat, and the Marine Corps doesn’t like to celebrate defeat,” Balzer said. “The first lesson in exegesis is to look at what went wrong, what went right. Some people would say we’re celebrating a tragedy, … but we need to learn from that experience.”

Mike Bangert, a builder from Petersburg, Pa., had the honor of being the only former Marine to bicycle to the museum for the opening of the exhibit.

Bangert, who served in Beirut in 1984, after the bombing, is on a 500-plus-mile bicycle ride to raise support for the issuance of Beirut Memorial U.S. postage stamp. That his journey, independent of other commemorations, brought him here in time for the exhibit’s opening was coincidence, Bangert said. He plans to be in Jacksonville, N.C., in time for the commemoration ceremonies for the bombing later this month at Camp Lejeune.

“My experience in Beirut pales in comparison to that of the real Beirut veterans,” Bangert said.

A House of Representatives resolution expressing the recommendation that a commemorative postage stamp should be issued in remembrance of the victims and in honor of the veterans of the peacekeeping mission in Beirut from 1982 to 1984 is hung up in committee. The resolution has 21 co-sponsors so far, but 50 are needed for action.

“I’m just trying to do my part to raise awareness,” Bangert said.



http://www.military.com/news/article/beirut-barracks-bombing-remembered.html?col=1186032310810&wh=wh

steelwall
10-21-2008, 01:01 AM
I'd like to say welcome home to my fellow comrade Nelson Crabtree. Has served 2 tours in Afgan...Welcome home buddy (take it easy on the wife, I know it's been a while) .... lol

lamberts-lost-tooth
11-10-2008, 09:54 AM
APPLEBEE'S thanking Vets with free meal

Select Applebee's Neighborhood Grill & Bar restaurants (164 participating restaurants nationwide) are testing a promotion that invites all active duty and veterans to pull up a chair for a delicious meal and heartfelt thanks this Veterans Day. With gratitude for their service and sacrifice, active duty and veterans will eat free at participating locations on Veterans Day (November 11, 2008) during regular business hours.

Veterans and active duty with proof of United States military service will be able to go to one of the participating Applebee's and select one complimentary entrée from a selection of delicious favorites: a savory House Sirloin, hearty Riblet Basket, zesty Fiesta Lime Chicken®, a juicy Quesadilla Burger or fresh Oriental Chicken Salad. All the traditional sides are included.

"It's an honor to host an event that helps the neighborhood come together and say thanks to our veterans and active servicemen and women. We are starting on a small scale to ensure we can best understand how to staff and service these important guests." said Mike Archer, President, Applebee's Services, Inc..

Proof of military service includes:
• U.S. Uniform Services Identification Card
• U.S. Uniform Services Retired Identification Card
• DD214
• LES
• Citation or Commendation
• Photograph in uniform
• Veterans Organization Card

Link to 164 participating Applebee's restaurants
http://www.applebees.com/VeteransDay.html

xfl2001fan
11-10-2008, 10:33 AM
Golden Corral is doing something just like this...but it's not just Active Duty and Veterans...as they are allowing Reservists and National Guardsmen to get a free meal as well.

To me, it's not worth the long lines...I'll go with a homecooked meal since I am at home...and enjoy the day with my family knowing the call to serve could come on any given day.

Hines0wnz
11-10-2008, 04:06 PM
That is nice of Applebee's.........I dont know of any convenient locations for me to take advantage of it though. *shrug*

NJarhead
11-10-2008, 04:16 PM
Disregard/Moved

BIGBENFASTWILLIE
11-10-2008, 04:18 PM
Thank you for the thread.
having been mobilized in 2003 for the "start of the war" in Iraq. My unit was sent to Kuwait to setup and run an ASP (Ammunition Supply Point.) Was probably one of the easiest mobilizations that any of us over there had to endure. Sucked being gone from the family, but was an otherwise cake assignment.

Where were you in Kuwait??

I did some covoy missions down to Kuwait a few times in 2004, and then when I lost my hearing I stayed at a camp in Kuwait waiting for a flight to Germany. (my platoon had a convoy mission to a camp and we stayed there thats when the docs sent me home).. Was an awesome camp... would have been great to do a whole year there...

devilsdancefloor
11-10-2008, 08:53 PM
i'd like to thank everyone who served it is a honor to call you a fellow soldier. But most of all i would like to thank all those i have known laughed, cried & just plan became brothers with that did not make it home.They are what this day is about. i miss them and i will always keep them near. i really dont share any of the "war" stories basically i keep them all buried and tucked away maybe one day i wil be able to talk openly about them. But the story i dont mind sharing is about my wife it is touching in a way. When i got my orders and kinda knew what we where going to do we had 72 hours to get ready not much time to talk to the wife. But on the morning i left i hurried out the door and left a open pack of smokes on the table. when i got back after teh gulf war 11 months later she took me to the freezer got them out and said "i knew you would come home for your smokes, you never leave with out'em.

xfl2001fan
11-10-2008, 09:22 PM
Where were you in Kuwait??

I did some covoy missions down to Kuwait a few times in 2004, and then when I lost my hearing I stayed at a camp in Kuwait waiting for a flight to Germany. (my platoon had a convoy mission to a camp and we stayed there thats when the docs sent me home).. Was an awesome camp... would have been great to do a whole year there...

Was at Camp Arifjan (aka Camp Country Club). I was the Supply Sergeant for the Brigade responsible for running the ASP there. Was quite possibly the easiest possible job...and the only difficulties came from an HHD Commander who forget that he wasn't enlisted anymore...and that respect works up and DOWN the chain of command. Even with his stupidity...a very cake assignment.

I'd guess that you were either at Arifjan or Doha if you were waiting for a flight out.

*********************
Devil...

Great story bro. That's one worth retelling!