PDA

View Full Version : Throw ALL the bums out!!! Enough is Enough


Preacher
10-01-2008, 05:56 PM
So now the bailout is coming back up for a vote. It was originally 3 pages long...

Until congress got a hold of it. Now it is 450 pages long.. and includes love-gifts and pet ideological pushes from both sides.

Funding for rural schools IN A BAILOUT??? :doh:

Tax breaks.. IN A BAIL OUT :doh:

Law changes to make mental health coverage mandatory just like physical health by insurance companies... IN A BAIL OUT!!!!! :doh:



ENOUGH. Throw out ALL THE BUMS!!!

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1008/14161.html

Texasteel
10-01-2008, 07:03 PM
If you remember Preacher there was a lot of us that started that talk about 10 or so years ago. It may be time to bring it back.

43Hitman
10-01-2008, 07:31 PM
I just saw on Lou Dobbs that they added 150B more the the bill to fund these ear marks..WTF!! That makes the total 850B. Where is McCain standing against this. He's supposed to be against ear marks..Who can we trust!

Preacher
10-01-2008, 07:33 PM
I just saw on Lou Dobbs that they added 150B more the the bill to fund these ear marks..WTF!! That makes the total 850B. Where is McCain standing against this. He's supposed to be against ear marks..Who can we trust!

Neither one of them...

Throw the bums out!!!


Seriously. It is utterly ridiculous.

When Rush Limbaugh and Michael Moore are on the same side of a debate... neither want this bill to pass... You know American politics are screwed up royally.

stlrtruck
10-02-2008, 07:33 AM
What kills me is that there has been little or no mention of where this money is coming from....let's add it to the trillion dollars we already owe China!

Great leadership? What the heck?

I'm sure we could put a bunch of middle school kids in congress and get better results. Of course their version of a bail out may include Wii's for everyone!

Vis
10-02-2008, 08:36 AM
Complain all you want but I need the Rum industry tax breaks for my hobby

revefsreleets
10-02-2008, 09:32 AM
What interests me the most is that last Monday we lost 1 TRILLION dollars in a stock market drop because the bailout failed (and, yes we gained half that back the next day, but it illustrates how important the markets are to the stability of ours, and the rest of the worlds economies). And there is language that pays the taxpayers back should this money be recovered. And this will stabilize the markets/banks. And it did increased FDIC protection from 100k to 250k. My mom has a friend who owns a car dealership, and the guy had two seperate people with 700 credit ratings fail to get approved yesterday. Dude said these are AUTOMATIC credit approvals before the bank/market crashes. Credit freezes cannot be helpful to this flailing economy. Friedman article on this is coming in a seperate thead...

X-Terminator
10-02-2008, 10:02 AM
You're honestly surprised about this, Preacher? I knew that this bailout would not have a chance of passage unless greedy politicians added billions of dollars of pork to it. This is even more of a reason to oppose the bailout. This kind of crap needs to stop in Washington - they treat the people's tax money like Chris Henry treats the law.

HometownGal
10-02-2008, 10:41 AM
Obama, Biden and McCain all voted YES.

http://news.aol.com/article/senate-roll-call-on-financial-bailout/197851?icid=200100397x1210509515x1200611627

Arizona
Kyl (R) Yes; McCain (R) Yes.

Delaware
Biden (D) Yes; Carper (D) Yes.

Illinois
Durbin (D) Yes; Obama (D) Yes.

revefsreleets
10-02-2008, 11:06 AM
I kind of think they had too...

Preacher
10-02-2008, 03:10 PM
You're honestly surprised about this, Preacher? I knew that this bailout would not have a chance of passage unless greedy politicians added billions of dollars of pork to it. This is even more of a reason to oppose the bailout. This kind of crap needs to stop in Washington - they treat the people's tax money like Chris Henry treats the law.

On this one... with all the world watching.. yes. I am surprised. I knew they were contemptuous... but this is utterly ridiculous.

There are a couple things in there I can understand. The raising of the FDIC limit makes SENSE in this bill, as it is about stabilizing the economy. However, tax breaks and early childhood education subsidizes in THIS bill? Horrendous.


I know I know X-Term.... I should have expected it. But I DID think there was SOME limit... guess I was wrong.

43Hitman
10-02-2008, 05:12 PM
And we all know how important that 100 million to wool research is.:coffee:

MrHarrison92
10-02-2008, 05:22 PM
Personally I think we should wait until theres a new president in office! I have a feeling that Bush is just throwing something together to stall until he's out of office! What a great way to challenge a new President!! All I know is that I don't trust the new one!

TroysBadDawg
10-02-2008, 07:37 PM
With this new bail out we can now welcome Socialism with open arms. All it is doing is putting chains on the next couple generations, and to make matters worse, we are allowing it to happen.

revefsreleets
10-02-2008, 07:46 PM
With this new bail out we can now welcome Socialism with open arms. All it is doing is putting chains on the next couple generations, and to make matters worse, we are allowing it to happen.

Oversimplification.

You know the market drop at the news that bailout failed last Monday was a net loss of 1 TRILLION?!?!

If this works, the taxpayers make money.

I hated it at first, but time and reading up has convinced me it's the best course of action right now. Perfect? Eff no! But better than inaction.

MACH1
10-02-2008, 07:52 PM
What about all the other CRAP they added onto it. Here are just a few....

- Film and Television Productions (Sec. 502)
- Wooden Arrows designed for use by children (Sec. 503)
- 6 page package of earmarks for litigants in the 1989 Exxon Valdez incident, Alaska (Sec. 504)
Tax earmark “extenders” in the bailout bill.
- Virgin Island and Puerto Rican Rum (Section 308)
- American Samoa (Sec. 309)
- Mine Rescue Teams (Sec. 310)
- Mine Safety Equipment (Sec. 311)
- Domestic Production Activities in Puerto Rico (Sec. 312)
- Indian Tribes (Sec. 314, 315)
- Railroads (Sec. 316)
- Auto Racing Tracks (317)
- District of Columbia (Sec. 322)
- Wool Research (Sec. 325)

I can see how these would help out the economy. :banging:

revefsreleets
10-02-2008, 08:02 PM
This particular issue may illuminate some things for people who normally don't know/care/pay attention.

EVERY bill in Congress looks like this.

millwalldavey
10-02-2008, 09:12 PM
Maybe people will start to see what Ive been telling you about ALL of these people.

Preacher
10-02-2008, 09:24 PM
What about all the other CRAP they added onto it. Here are just a few....

- Film and Television Productions (Sec. 502)
- Wooden Arrows designed for use by children (Sec. 503)
- 6 page package of earmarks for litigants in the 1989 Exxon Valdez incident, Alaska (Sec. 504)
Tax earmark “extenders” in the bailout bill.
- Virgin Island and Puerto Rican Rum (Section 308)
- American Samoa (Sec. 309)
- Mine Rescue Teams (Sec. 310)
- Mine Safety Equipment (Sec. 311)
- Domestic Production Activities in Puerto Rico (Sec. 312)
- Indian Tribes (Sec. 314, 315)
- Railroads (Sec. 316)
- Auto Racing Tracks (317)
- District of Columbia (Sec. 322)
- Wool Research (Sec. 325)

I can see how these would help out the economy. :banging:

Oversimplification.

You know the market drop at the news that bailout failed last Monday was a net loss of 1 TRILLION?!?!

If this works, the taxpayers make money.

I hated it at first, but time and reading up has convinced me it's the best course of action right now. Perfect? Eff no! But better than inaction.


I have no problem with putting money there... IF and ONLY if it is thought out... what I DONT like is Mach1's list.

revefsreleets
10-03-2008, 08:37 AM
Kristoff makes a compelling case for the bailout. And uses a failed precedent to prove his point...

http://www.ohio.com/editorial/commentary/30240474.html

Japan's lesson? Save the jerks
By Nicholas D. Kristof



Published on Friday, Oct 03, 2008

NEW YORK: In the early 1990s, when I was a foreign correspondent looking for my next overseas posting with the New York Times, I sought Japan. At the time, Tokyo was an awe-inspiring economic titan, arguably the most important capital outside the United States.

Then Japanese politicians, acting with the same sublime ineptitude that our own House of Representatives displayed this week, ignored a growing banking crisis and dithered on a bailout. And so I watched from Tokyo as a mighty economy melted like an iceberg in the Caribbean.

Japan's failure to respond urgently and decisively to its banking mess caused the country to endure a ''lost decade'' of economic stagnation. If America wants to avoid Japan's decline, the House should approve a bailout, immediately.

Just as in the U.S. today, most Japanese did not initially appreciate how devastating a banking crisis could be to the real economy. Banks and real estate tycoons in Japan were corrupt, profligate and unsympathetic figures, and no one wanted to help them. On corporate expense accounts, they sipped coffee with gold leaf and patronized ''no-panties shabu-shabu'' restaurants, which had mirrored floors and miniskirted waitresses.

In short, the businessmen involved were jerks. And, whether in Japan or the U.S., it's challenging for politicians to frame a bailout with the slogan: Save the jerks!

Japanese politicians didn't want to rescue such unpopular fat cats and didn't see any emergency. So Japan's economy slowly lost air, and the biggest losers were the small futon makers who couldn't get credit and the farmers on remote islands who lost ferry service when the government eventually had to cut back on spending.

For those of you accustomed to bull markets, who think we're sure to come out of this quickly, remember this: Japan's stock index is still less than one-third of its level of 19 years ago.

In 1993, after Japanese stocks had already tumbled for several years, an American friend told me that he was going to invest in Japanese stocks. ''I don't know what they're going to do for the next couple of years,'' he said, ''but we all know that over five years they'll recover and do better than American stocks.''

Since then, Japanese stocks have lost another 40 percent of their value.

The Federal Reserve chairman, Ben Bernanke, is an expert on Japan's Lost Decade, and the president of the New York Fed, Timothy Geithner, lived in Tokyo during that debacle, and their experience no doubt is one reason for the urgency of Washington's response.

The lesson from Japan is pretty clear: Hold your nose and support a bailout, in particular to clean up banking assets.

All this said, critics of the bailout have reason to be furious. It is profoundly unfair that working-class American families lose their homes, their jobs, their savings, while it's plutocrats who caused the problem who get rescued.

If the congressional critics of the bailout want to do some lasting good, they should come back in January — after approving the bailout now — with a series of tough measures to improve governance and inject more fairness in the economy.

A starting point would be to remove tax subsidies on executive pay and allow courts to restructure mortgages as they do other kinds of debt. The Institute for Policy Studies in Washington estimates that U.S. taxpayers every year provide more than $20 billion in tax subsidies for executive pay.

Among the strongest critics of inflated executive pay have been Warren Buffett and the late management guru, Peter Drucker, who argued that CEO salaries should peak at no more than 20 or 25 times those of the average worker. (Last year, CEOs got an average of 344 times the wages of the typical worker.)

The truth is that with the complicity of boards of directors, CEOs hijack shareholder wealth in ways that are unconscionable. As the Wall Street Journal reported in June, if Eugene Isenberg, the 78-year-old CEO of Nabors Industries were to drop dead one of these days, his estate would be entitled to a ''severance payment'' of at least $263 million — more than the firm's first-quarter earnings.

With such greed oozing out of the corporate suite, and with financial companies enjoying the confidence of only 10 percent of Americans today (down from 36 percent in 2000), it's no wonder that voters are repulsed by the idea of helping banks. Wall Street urgently needs to undertake its own housecleaning, for the public revulsion toward it undermines its own long-term interests.

But, for now, the priority is to get credit flowing again in the arteries of commerce, even if that means saving the jerks. Otherwise, we risk becoming Japan.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kristof is a New York Times columnist.

Dino 6 Rings
10-03-2008, 12:14 PM
You mean...I'm not the only one in this country shapening my pitch fork and constructing long lasting torches?

Thank goodness, I was worried about how I was going to carry all these torches to Washington by myself.

When do we March?

stlrtruck
10-03-2008, 12:41 PM
The Wednesday before the BYE Week.

Dino 6 Rings
10-03-2008, 02:59 PM
I'm ready...my pitchfork is razor sharp.

stlrtruck
10-03-2008, 03:07 PM
I left mine in MD 8 years ago, do you have an extra one I can borrow. Or I can carry the extra torches.

revefsreleets
10-03-2008, 03:21 PM
Here's what I know: This "fiscal crisis" or whatever you want to call it has cost me exactly $9250 to date. That's the amount of my commissions I've lost from projected sales of advertisement that have been cancelled directly because of the bank/Wall Street debacle.

I want this shit fixed, and I want it fixed now...and I'll be honest, I could care less what means we use to fix it, just FIX IT!

Preacher
10-03-2008, 04:23 PM
Here's what I know: This "fiscal crisis" or whatever you want to call it has cost me exactly $9250 to date. That's the amount of my commissions I've lost from projected sales of advertisement that have been cancelled directly because of the bank/Wall Street debacle.

I want this shit fixed, and I want it fixed now...and I'll be honest, I could care less what means we use to fix it, just FIX IT!


I understand what you are saying. I want it fixed too. I have lost half my stock (thanks to an ill-timed statement from Reid on insurance companies).

However, I don't want it fixed in such a manner that they will take all that we will recover in taxes to pay these ignorant pork add-ons.

revefsreleets
10-04-2008, 05:11 PM
That pork was going into one bill or another...this was just political expediency...

I want my 40 grand in sales back now!

Hines0wnz
10-08-2008, 04:57 PM
That Bailout really stabilized the market this week. :wave:

Preacher
10-08-2008, 05:00 PM
That Bailout really stabilized the market this week. :wave:

:hatsoff:

Did we expect anything else?

That is what happens when the govt. gets involved in the markets... and now, we open ourselves up to inflation by dumping 750 BILLION EXTRA dollars into the general market... at a time when salaries are stagnant.

Brilliant job by the fed. govt... again. :rolleyes:

What I feared in my last couple posts is probably exactly what has come to pass...

The bailout came, too fast, not thought out, with a whole bunch of pork, that will artificially mess with the markets.

Dino 6 Rings
10-08-2008, 05:02 PM
Term Limits Already. If you can't fix stuff in 12 years, get the Ef Out of My Buildings!

Preacher
10-08-2008, 05:03 PM
Term Limits Already. If you can't fix stuff in 12 years, get the Ef Out of My Buildings!

Like I said in another thread...

12 years of government service... PERIOD. State and national.

No more career politicians.

SteelMember
10-10-2008, 01:44 PM
I thought the PC phrase was "Rescue Plan", not bailout.

When exactly will this 700 trilliion dollar life preserver get to me?

No meal, just the check... but maybe a nice kiss at the door. :noidea:

Like I said in another thread...

12 years of government service... PERIOD. State and national.

No more career politicians.

Thanks for playing... NEXT.

Preacher
10-10-2008, 03:24 PM
I thought the PC phrase was "Rescue Plan", not bailout.

When exactly will this 700 trilliion dollar life preserver get to me?

No meal, just the check... but maybe a nice kiss at the door. :noidea:



Thanks for playing... NEXT.

Not sure what you meant by your post...

I think you agree with me that something really smells about the rescue plan... and both parties stinketh...


Were you for or against the idea of career politicians.

SteelMember
10-10-2008, 03:53 PM
Not sure what you meant by your post...
I think you agree with me that something really smells about the rescue plan... and both parties stinketh...
Were you for or against the idea of career politicians.

Sorry if I was vague.

Yes. I agree on both counts.
Shoving a rescue plan down our collective throats, which was not passed until they added plenty of BS to satisfy politicians self serving agendas, makes me ill.
Like it was stated earlier, all bills may look like this, and that is the problem. There may be good things in there, but was that the reason it was written in the first place? NO. It seems as if words like streamlined don't even exist in our government. Overcomplicating everything seems to be the standard, yet there are always loopholes.:noidea:

and as for career politicians, "Thanks for playing...Next", meant don't let the door hit 'ya in the ass on the way out. To them. Not you.:drink:

Preacher
10-10-2008, 04:21 PM
Sorry if I was vague.

Yes. I agree on both counts.
Shoving a rescue plan down our collective throats, which was not passed until they added plenty of BS to satisfy politicians self serving agendas, makes me ill.
Like it was stated earlier, all bills may look like this, and that is the problem. There may be good things in there, but was that the reason it was written in the first place? NO. It seems as if words like streamlined don't even exist in our government. Overcomplicating everything seems to be the standard, yet there are always loopholes.:noidea:

and as for career politicians, "Thanks for playing...Next", meant don't let the door hit 'ya in the ass on the way out. To them. Not you.:drink:

:hatsoff:

Dino 6 Rings
10-10-2008, 04:23 PM
We need a real evaluation of our current political system. A 3rd Party is so required right now.

There is no party for the every day man anymore. Or everyday woman for that matter. Why if you are pro-life do you have to be a republican. Why if you are anti guns do you have to be a Democrat.

There is no middle ground. The Media is partially responsible because they never report on the middle, its always one extreme or the other with them, and every issue, is turned into a "crisis" to stir up ratings.

Not all issues are a Crisis. Gun Control isn't a Crisis until some nut case teenager blows away 10 kids in his school. Then its a "crisis" Drugs aren't a crisis until some wackjob gets messed up on meth and drives a bus full of tourists off a bridge. The War isn't a "Crisis" until some whacko walks into a market full of people and blows himself up. Drunk Driving, Drugs, Bullying, Over Weight, ADD, Voting Fraud, The War (any conflict) The Election, the Financial Systems, Wall Street, Main Street, Food Supplies, Lead Paint in Toys, Poisoned Milk, Kidnapped children, Pediphiles on the Internet, High Speed Chases, Oil Supply, Gas Prices, Pirates in Somalia, The War in the Sudan, Immigration Raids, AIDS, Cancer Clusters, SSDs In Teens....

when is an issue not a Crisis? When it stops selling papers. That's when.

January regardless of who wins the election, a new crisis will appear more important than the financial one we have now. Global Warming, Global Cooling, Green House Gases, Polar Bears, Box Cutters on Planes, Tainted Chocolate, Risen Scare, GM Cutting Jobs, Nafta Super Highway, Mexican Trucks on our Roads, Buffalo Bills in the Playoffs...

sigh...I'm tired man. I just want to do my job, love my family and watch my Steelers.

Dino 6 Rings
10-10-2008, 04:26 PM
Politicans watch the news and just grab whatever Crisis is selling papers to make speeches about and "pretend" to save us from a "Crisis" that really...is just part of life sometimes.

tony hipchest
10-10-2008, 04:26 PM
the new party should be called the Steelercratic party.

MACH1
10-10-2008, 04:29 PM
the new party should be called the Steelercratic party.

There's something everyone can agree on. :sofunny:

Preacher
10-10-2008, 04:51 PM
We need a real evaluation of our current political system. A 3rd Party is so required right now.

There is no party for the every day man anymore. Or everyday woman for that matter. Why if you are pro-life do you have to be a republican. Why if you are anti guns do you have to be a Democrat.

There is no middle ground. The Media is partially responsible because they never report on the middle, its always one extreme or the other with them, and every issue, is turned into a "crisis" to stir up ratings.

Not all issues are a Crisis. Gun Control isn't a Crisis until some nut case teenager blows away 10 kids in his school. Then its a "crisis" Drugs aren't a crisis until some wackjob gets messed up on meth and drives a bus full of tourists off a bridge. The War isn't a "Crisis" until some whacko walks into a market full of people and blows himself up. Drunk Driving, Drugs, Bullying, Over Weight, ADD, Voting Fraud, The War (any conflict) The Election, the Financial Systems, Wall Street, Main Street, Food Supplies, Lead Paint in Toys, Poisoned Milk, Kidnapped children, Pediphiles on the Internet, High Speed Chases, Oil Supply, Gas Prices, Pirates in Somalia, The War in the Sudan, Immigration Raids, AIDS, Cancer Clusters, SSDs In Teens....

when is an issue not a Crisis? When it stops selling papers. That's when.

January regardless of who wins the election, a new crisis will appear more important than the financial one we have now. Global Warming, Global Cooling, Green House Gases, Polar Bears, Box Cutters on Planes, Tainted Chocolate, Risen Scare, GM Cutting Jobs, Nafta Super Highway, Mexican Trucks on our Roads, Buffalo Bills in the Playoffs...

sigh...I'm tired man. I just want to do my job, love my family and watch my Steelers.

I knew something like that was coming!!! :rofl: