PDA

View Full Version : The best QBs to never win a Super Bowl vs. the worst ones who got it.


SteelersMongol
01-25-2009, 08:15 PM
There are 11 quarterbacks in the Hall of Fame who have won the Super Bowl. Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Brett Favre will join that elite group one day and a victory in Super Bowl XLIII next Sunday would most likely secure a place for Cardinals QB Kurt Warner in Canton.

Most would agree that Dan Marino is probably the best Super Bowl-era quarterback who never hoisted the Lombardi Trophy. He was just 23 and in his second season when Marino led the Dolphins to Super Bowl XIX, but Miami's 38-16 loss to San Francisco would be his only appearance in the big game.

Topped by Marino, here is my list of the best QBs to never win a Super Bowl.

Dan Marino: The nine-time Pro Bowl QB was proof that defenses win championships. During a 17-year career with Miami, Marino threw for more than 61,000 yards and held several passing records when he retired. But he was just 8-10 in the postseason as a starter.

Jim Kelly: Marino played in just one Super Bowl because of Kelly and the Bills, who beat Miami three times in the playoffs, including once for the AFC Championship. As a starter, Kelly was 101-59 and led Buffalo to eight playoff appearances in 11 seasons. And the Bills went 49-15 between 1990-93, the most victories by a team during that four-year stretch. But the Bills lost four straight Super Bowls, a dubious feat that Marino probably wouldn't wished upon his nemesis.

Fran Tarkenton: He won 124 games during an 18-year career that began in 1961. But like Kelly, Tarkenton couldn't win the big one. Tarkenton was never at his best in Super Bowl losses to the Dolphins, Steelers and Raiders. In those three games, he threw one touchdown pass and six interceptions. It's no wonder Minnesota never led in any of those games and was outscored 52-7 in the first three quarters.

Warren Moon: A nine-time Pro Bowl quarterback, Moon padded his stats with the run-and-shoot offense deployed by the Houston Oilers in the 1990s. He won 102 games as a starter, the most wins by Super Bowl-era QB who never played in the big game. He never even played in a conference championship, going 3-7 in the playoffs.

Dan Fouts: In 15 years with the Chargers, Fouts was one of the NFL's most prolific passers. He threw for more than 43,000 yards and was named to the Pro Bowl six times, earning him a bust in the Hall of Fame. He led San Diego to consecutive appearances in the AFC Championship Game, but the Chargers lost to the Raiders and Bengals.

http://www.fannation.com/si_blogs/for_the_record/posts/43941-the-best-qbs-to-never-win-a-super-bowl?eref=fromSI

And the nominees for the worst quarterbacks to win the Super Bowl:

Trent Dilfer: The Ravens' starting QB in a 34-7 win over the Giants in Super Bowl XXV threw more interceptions (129) than touchdown passes (113) over a 13-year career that included stops in Tampa, Baltimore, Seattle, Cleveland and San Francisco. He's better in Bristol than he was in any of those cities.

Doug Williams: His MVP performance in leading the Redskins to a 42-10 victory over Denver in Super Bowl XXII was as much a fluke as a great story. Williams remains the only black QB to win a Super Bowl. He is also one of two starting QBs in a Super Bowl -- Daryle Lamonica was the other -- to complete less than 50 percent of his career passes.

Jim Plunkett: Of the eight quarterbacks who won at least two Super Bowls, Plunkett is the only one not in the Hall of Fame. He resurrected his career with the Raiders, going 8-2 in the postseason that included victories in Super Bowls XV and XVIII. But he threw 164 touchdown passes and 198 interceptions, and his 67.5 quarterback rating was the second lowest by a QB who won a Super Bowl, just behind the next guy.

Joe Namath: Regarded by many as the most overrated QB ever, Broadway Joe was more style than substance. He barely completed 50 percent of his passes and threw more interceptions (220) than touchdown passes (173). And his career QB rating of 65.5 was the lowest by a signal caller who won a Super Bowl.

Jeff Hostetler: He was a backup when he filled in for the injured Phil Simms in Super Bowl XXV. The following season, Giants coach Ray Handley named Hostetler his starter over Simms. But Hostetler couldn't stay healthy and the Giants missed the playoffs two years.

http://www.fannation.com/si_blogs/for_the_record/posts/43961-worst-qbs-to-host-a-super-bowl-trophy?eref=fromSI

I feel bad 4 Dan, really. & then what makes the writer of this article that Warner will get his? :flap: :wink02: :chuckle:

SteelCityMan786
01-25-2009, 08:33 PM
I feel bad 4 Dan, really. & then what makes the writer of this article that Warner will get his? :flap: :wink02: :chuckle:

Warner already got one with the Rams.

Dino 6 Rings
01-25-2009, 08:36 PM
I feel bad for Jim Kelly as much as I do for Dan. Dan was the entire offense in Miami, the entire game ran through him on offense for his entire career. Kelly...he had studs on both sides of the ball in play maker positions and still lost 4 in a row.

4 in a row...that's just gross. 2 to the same team back to back. And his first loss, FG Wide as time expired. He was so close.

Yet Dan only got there once and had the horrible luck of having to play Mr Super Bowl Joe Montana.


I also agree with Joe Namath being one of the worst to win. Namath is the biggest QB myth of all time.

Plunkett at least lead his team there twice.

HughC
01-25-2009, 09:35 PM
There are definitely some worse candidates than Williams, Plunkett, Namath, and maybe even Hostetler for the bottom of that list. Mark Rypien and Brad Johnson are two that come to mind right away, as does Earl Morrall (unless you give that win to Unitas.) I'd even say Griese may not have been as good a QB as those four.

KeiselPower99
01-25-2009, 09:35 PM
Dan and Jim are the ones I feel for most but Jim had his chance 4 times.

HometownGal
01-25-2009, 09:36 PM
I feel bad for Jim Kelly as much as I do for Dan. Dan was the entire offense in Miami, the entire game ran through him on offense for his entire career. Kelly...he had studs on both sides of the ball in play maker positions and still lost 4 in a row.

4 in a row...that's just gross. 2 to the same team back to back. And his first loss, FG Wide as time expired. He was so close.

Yet Dan only got there once and had the horrible luck of having to play Mr Super Bowl Joe Montana.


I also agree with Joe Namath being one of the worst to win. Namath is the biggest QB myth of all time.

Plunkett at least lead his team there twice.

I agree about Jim Kelly. I was and always will be a huge fan of his (unless he was playing against the Steelers, of course) and always felt so bad that the guy gave all he had to the Bills but never got that coveted ring.

Joe Namath was a one-hit wonder, imho. (Off topic, but I just never saw what all of the ladies saw in him. :yuck:)

Tarkenton was a very good QB but ran around like a little ant trying to get away from the repellant - it was very difficult most times to get to him. Hell - it was hard to see him behind his OL - he was a midget compared to most QB's in that era. 3 Super Bowl appearances without a win.

HughC
01-25-2009, 10:01 PM
I also agree with Joe Namath being one of the worst to win. Namath is the biggest QB myth of all time.

Plunkett at least lead his team there twice.
While I agree with your take on Plunkett, I have to disagree with your viewpoint on Namath. In my opinion, in some strange way a player from New York is not over hyped.

The only thing Namath is remembered for is guaranteeing a win, and then following up with the biggest upset victory in sports history. But Namath did accomplish more than that. He was the first QB to pass for over 400 yards - when 3000 yards was an incredible number.

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/leaders/pass_yds_single_season.htm

You can't compare just total numbers such as yards passing from year to the next; the only valid comparison is to that player's peers. That is why Sammy Baugh, Johnny Unitas, and yes, Namath, should be held in high esteem. Dan Majkowski throwing for 4300 yards in 1989 is no big deal; Joe Namath going over 4K in 1969 is a huge accomplishment.

Namath was in the top two in passing yards five times, and was one of the big reasons why football changed from 'three yards and a cloud of dust' to the game we watch today. His legacy was derailed by knee injuries (only 5 games in '70, 4 in '71, and 6 in '73) which would be no big deal with modern medicine, but ended sports careers at that time.

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/N/NamaJo00.htm

T.Richardson
01-25-2009, 10:10 PM
Hey remember Namath played before the Mel blount rule.

BrandonCarr39
01-26-2009, 07:08 PM
Dan and Jim are the ones I feel for most but Jim had his chance 4 times.

Dan and Jim were victims of being on teams with bad D's.

OTOH-take some less-than-mediocre QBs like Mark Rypien, Eli Manning, Trent Dilfer-they had the luxury of being on teams with excellent D's and strong run games.

OneForTheToe
01-26-2009, 08:55 PM
I agree about Jim Kelly. I was and always will be a huge fan of his (unless he was playing against the Steelers, of course) and always felt so bad that the guy gave all he had to the Bills but never got that coveted ring.

Joe Namath was a one-hit wonder, imho. (Off topic, but I just never saw what all of the ladies saw in him. :yuck:) Tarkenton was a very good QB but ran around like a little ant trying to get away from the repellant - it was very difficult most times to get to him. Hell - it was hard to see him behind his OL - he was a midget compared to most QB's in that era. 3 Super Bowl appearances without a win.

It was probably his drunken slurring passes he made at them on national television - at least for Susie Colber.:laughing:

Seriously, while Namath was overrated, as someone pointed out, the passing rules were much different back then. Bradshaw's numbers were not that great except in one major (most important) category - 4 Super Bowls.

I agree with that list except Fouts should be above Moon - although both deserve the Hall of fame. Still, Moon never even made the AFC Championship game. And his stats were inflated because of the run-and-shoot. I also liked Jim Kelly.

As for the debate about the worst QB to win a Super Bowl, it reminds me of the question about what they call the guy who graduates last in medical class - doctor. Whomever the "worst" QB to win a Super Bowl is, he's still got the bling, bling, and goes down in history as a winning Super Bowl QB. Not too shabby.

Ishkabibble
01-28-2009, 03:40 PM
How're we 10 posts in and no one has mentioned Jim McMahon? He played on a team with the most dominant defense we've ever seen and he had Walter Payton in the backfield. He was Trent Dilfer before Trent Dilfer. Also had later opportunities to distinguish himself w/ the Chargers and a some good Philly teams but played horribly. To my way of thinking, he defined the word "pedestrian."