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trauben
03-31-2009, 02:09 PM
http://www.landofmarbles.com/phpbb/images/smilies/driver.gifWell? The time has finally arrived and this coming Saturday morning I'll be taking my 16 year old daughter to the DMV and getting her a driver's permit. Then I'll drive us up to the local mall where we are going to switch seats and I'll begin teaching her to have confidence behind the wheel of a vehicle.

I can't believe 16 years have passed so quickly!

http://smileys.on-my-web.com/repository/Leisures_and_Sports/leisures-and-sports-096.gifIt seems like just yesterday I was teaching her to ride her bike and encouraging her to take off those training wheels.

You know? I can honestly say that I'm not worried about this. If I had a skittish, unconfident child I might be, but she's nothing of the kind. She's smart, steady in her decisions, not over-confident, and has a healthy respect for rules.

Maybe I'm more calm about this because I've been through it once before teaching a sister to drive when she lived with me.

Anyone out there have any tips or horror/success stories to share on this topic?

I'll let you know how it goes on Monday.

If by chance I'm not back, send out the troops! :wink02:

lamberts-lost-tooth
03-31-2009, 02:48 PM
http://www.landofmarbles.com/phpbb/images/smilies/driver.gifWell? The time has finally arrived and this coming Saturday morning I'll be taking my 16 year old daughter to the DMV and getting her a driver's permit. Then I'll drive us up to the local mall where we are going to switch seats and I'll begin teaching her to have confidence behind the wheel of a vehicle.

I can't believe 16 years have passed so quickly!

http://smileys.on-my-web.com/repository/Leisures_and_Sports/leisures-and-sports-096.gifIt seems like just yesterday I was teaching her to ride her bike and encouraging her to take off those training wheels.

You know? I can honestly say that I'm not worried about this. If I had a skittish, unconfident child I might be, but she's nothing of the kind. She's smart, steady in her decisions, not over-confident, and has a healthy respect for rules.

Maybe I'm more calm about this because I've been through it once before teaching a sister to drive when she lived with me.

Anyone out there have any tips or horror/success stories to share on this topic?

I'll let you know how it goes on Monday.

If by chance I'm not back, send out the troops! :wink02:

My son gets his permit in the next couple of weeks....I think I should be asking advise from you!!!!!

Galax Steeler
03-31-2009, 02:55 PM
My son is only seven almost eight and I already let him sit in my lap and steer my truck on the back roads he really do's good so hopefully when he turns sixteen he will know what he is doing and be ready to drive. I believe in getting them started young and learning them as they go.

trauben
03-31-2009, 03:05 PM
My son gets his permit in the next couple of weeks....I think I should be asking advise from you!!!!!

Never lose your cool. They'll lose confidence in themselves forever.

I had an incident when my sister was making a fast turn into a bank's parking lot too wide. I had to reach over her and grab the wheel from the far side and yank hard to ensure that turn wouldn't hit the outbound car. We missed it by a hair. I had never said a word. She literally let the car coast into the parking lot and rest in a space near no one. We were there for me to get money out of the ATM. I simply got out, got the money, and when I came back to the car? She was sitting in the passenger seat silently wiping away tears of fear. I walked up to the passenger window (which was down), and joked at her to get out of my seat. Then she cracked and started crying saying that she didn't think I'd let her drive again. I made her get out and get behind the wheel again and then we sat and talked. I told her to always remember that she was in command of the vehicle, the vehicle was not in command of her. I told her that if she didn't like the approach and speed to a turn, simply go around the block and come back at it. I told her not to focus on the a-hole behind her irritated at her inexperience and to only focus on the moment at hand. Then I told her she was smart and could easily do this as I pointed out some freak driving by and stating that if he could drive, so could she. We laughed. She wiped away the tears. Then she determinedly started the car up again and never once had a problem. I always felt good after that with her behind the wheel. I think if I had reacted differently that day, if I had gone off into a tantrum ranting and raving at her? Called her names? There would've been a serious lack of confidence in her ability for life. Even if we had connected? The car was insured, cars are repaired, but images and words spoken harshly are burnt in the brain to be recalled forever. I'd rather pay the damages and laugh about it later in life than have a bad memory sour our relationship for the future.

Just my advice........since you asked. :wink02:

trauben
03-31-2009, 03:13 PM
My son is only seven almost eight and I already let him sit in my lap and steer my truck on the back roads he really do's good so hopefully when he turns sixteen he will know what he is doing and be ready to drive. I believe in getting them started young and learning them as they go.
I bought one of those electric cars for my daughter when she was young. I drew stop signs, yield signs and parking lot spaces in our driveway and walkways with colored chalk. This way she could start practicing young. Why not? She had the ability to back up and put that thing in reverse, why not use it to introduce the process to her? My daughter loves to tell people that she remembers me teaching her how to do a three-point turn on our walkways. :thumbsup:

steelreserve
03-31-2009, 03:14 PM
You make it sound so easy. I lived near Philadelphia for a few months in the end of 2007, and when I tried to go through all the DMV stuff so I could legally drive a car I had bought, they made it pretty clear that the state of Pennsylvania does not want anyone to drive a car there ever. And I already HAD a perfectly good driver's license. Hope it works out for you...

TheWarDen86
03-31-2009, 03:18 PM
You sure the Mall is the best place? I know I am petrified to drive in the mall p-lot here myself.
:noidea: Maybe that's just because it's New Jersey though (Soccer/Shopping Mom capital of the world).

MACH1
03-31-2009, 04:04 PM
It could be worse. Up until a few years ago the legal age for driving in Idaho was 14.

lamberts-lost-tooth
03-31-2009, 05:02 PM
Never lose your cool. They'll lose confidence in themselves forever.

I had an incident when my sister was making a fast turn into a bank's parking lot too wide. I had to reach over her and grab the wheel from the far side and yank hard to ensure that turn wouldn't hit the outbound car. We missed it by a hair. I had never said a word. She literally let the car coast into the parking lot and rest in a space near no one. We were there for me to get money out of the ATM. I simply got out, got the money, and when I came back to the car? She was sitting in the passenger seat silently wiping away tears of fear. I walked up to the passenger window (which was down), and joked at her to get out of my seat. Then she cracked and started crying saying that she didn't think I'd let her drive again. I made her get out and get behind the wheel again and then we sat and talked. I told her to always remember that she was in command of the vehicle, the vehicle was not in command of her. I told her that if she didn't like the approach and speed to a turn, simply go around the block and come back at it. I told her not to focus on the a-hole behind her irritated at her inexperience and to only focus on the moment at hand. Then I told her she was smart and could easily do this as I pointed out some freak driving by and stating that if he could drive, so could she. We laughed. She wiped away the tears. Then she determinedly started the car up again and never once had a problem. I always felt good after that with her behind the wheel. I think if I had reacted differently that day, if I had gone off into a tantrum ranting and raving at her? Called her names? There would've been a serious lack of confidence in her ability for life. Even if we had connected? The car was insured, cars are repaired, but images and words spoken harshly are burnt in the brain to be recalled forever. I'd rather pay the damages and laugh about it later in life than have a bad memory sour our relationship for the future.

Just my advice........since you asked. :wink02:

...soooooo....rosary beads...a football helmet...and screaming in fear....are...bad, right?

xfl2001fan
03-31-2009, 10:05 PM
While my older sister has been driving longer than I have (I didn't even get my license until I was 18)...I learned to drive a stick almost immediately.

After I got out of the Navy, she decided she wanted to learn to drive the stick shift as well. At the time, I was driving a 1999 Chevy Cavalier (I had purchased it new...GREAT car for learning a stick.)

I took her out on the Country roads to one of my hunting holes so that there wouldn't be a lot of traffic. She did great until a giant SUV got behind us at a stop sign. Then it was move an inch forward...and the car would shake as she stalled. Start the engine...stall the engine. Start the engine, stall the engine.

The people driving the SUV were probably in their late 50's and laughing...but I got out and helped direct them around us and through the stop sign. I had to sit against the drivers door though....to ensure my sister couldn't get out.

As the old couple pulled up along side us, the woman asked if everything was OK with the car. I told them that the clutch fluid was low and so it was sticking. The old man started laughing (his wife was all like "Oh My")

My sister (who's husband is a mechanic) started cracking up about that time (she was on the verge of tears.) After that, she was fine...and managed to get us all the way home with no stalls (couple of close calls though.)

It's all in the attitude you present and keeping your student calm. I'm sure you'll both do fine with teach your kids to drive.

ShutDown24
03-31-2009, 10:11 PM
I just fairly recently got my license. Let me give you some advice from the standpoint of the student. Don't be over-bearing. I can remember learning to drive with my parents in the car with me constantly telling me "do this, do that" it gets ANNOYING. I know to use my turn signal, thank you. After the first go of it, don't mention simple things. Let her remember them on her own and if she forgets, then you mention it. Basically the best advice I could give to make it the easiest to learn would be to let the student do it then critique. Just take it easy :)

devilsdancefloor
03-31-2009, 10:46 PM
my daughter gets her liscense next tuesday i cant beelive the permit has gone by so fast! Sheis doing well i even got her driving a manual transmission. Im very confidnet in her ability.:tt03::tt03::tt03:

Galax Steeler
04-01-2009, 03:48 AM
It could be worse. Up until a few years ago the legal age for driving in Idaho was 14.

I would be scarred out of my wits. I would be looking over my shoulders everywhere I went.

SteelShooter
04-01-2009, 04:01 AM
Brother, don't worry so much about "I can't believe 16 years have passed so quickly! " ............my daughter is 18 and graduates this coming June. Mannnnn, I thought high school boys were bad, I will have to deal with college guys next year!

steelwall
04-01-2009, 04:40 AM
Wanna talk about driving try living in a city with 17 million Chinese people... No words can describle it. I'll try though...mad house...insane in the membrain.....unorganized....balls to the wall...oblivious...Chinese+women+cell phones.....D.U.I's for COPS... maybe that can give ya'll some insight

stlrtruck
04-01-2009, 06:15 AM
I started teaching my oldest child how to drive before she even got her license. About 3 times a month we would head out to the local high school parking lot and for the first few months I would be in the passenger seat and then I moved to outside the truck.

I would throw balls in front of the truck to get her to recognize possible hazards and grow her reflexes.

My son turns 14 this October and early next Spring I'll start teaching him how to drive THE TRUCK.

And then eventually, the Princess - but I'm not sure I'll let her drive until she's 30!

trauben
04-01-2009, 07:15 AM
You make it sound so easy. I lived near Philadelphia for a few months in the end of 2007, and when I tried to go through all the DMV stuff so I could legally drive a car I had bought, they made it pretty clear that the state of Pennsylvania does not want anyone to drive a car there ever. And I already HAD a perfectly good driver's license. Hope it works out for you...
Did they know you were a Steelers fan out there near Philly? I think I smell a conspiracy. :wink02::tt:

You sure the Mall is the best place? I know I am petrified to drive in the mall p-lot here myself.
:noidea: Maybe that's just because it's New Jersey though (Soccer/Shopping Mom capital of the world).
This mall is the best place. It has many open lots, is HUGE and empty in most places. And yes, you feel that way just because you're in NJ. LOL. This mall is nothing like the Raceway mall in Freehold or the crazy Ocean County Mall down there in beach territory. (I used to live in NJ for a while so -- been there done that :chuckle:)

...soooooo....rosary beads...a football helmet...and screaming in fear....are...bad, right?
Keep the rosary beads but clenched in the pocket out of sight. :sofunny:

I just fairly recently got my license. Let me give you some advice from the standpoint of the student. Don't be over-bearing. I can remember learning to drive with my parents in the car with me constantly telling me "do this, do that" it gets ANNOYING. I know to use my turn signal, thank you. After the first go of it, don't mention simple things. Let her remember them on her own and if she forgets, then you mention it. Basically the best advice I could give to make it the easiest to learn would be to let the student do it then critique. Just take it easy :)
You just described my father. He taught me what kind of a person not to be sitting by someone learning to drive.

Wanna talk about driving try living in a city with 17 million Chinese people... No words can describle it. I'll try though...mad house...insane in the membrain.....unorganized....balls to the wall...oblivious...Chinese+women+cell phones.....D.U.I's for COPS... maybe that can give ya'll some insight
Does Japanese people count? I've driven in and around Tokyo. I would NOT want to teach anyone to drive over there! Not only are you driving on the other side of the road, but the driver's seat is opposite in the cars as well.

TheWarDen86
04-01-2009, 02:28 PM
Did they know you were a Steelers fan out there near Philly? I think I smell a conspiracy. :wink02::tt:


This mall is the best place. It has many open lots, is HUGE and empty in most places. And yes, you feel that way just because you're in NJ. LOL. This mall is nothing like the Raceway mall in Freehold or the crazy Ocean County Mall down there in beach territory. (I used to live in NJ for a while so -- been there done that :chuckle:)


Keep the rosary beads but clenched in the pocket out of sight. :sofunny:


You just described my father. He taught me what kind of a person not to be sitting by someone learning to drive.


Does Japanese people count? I've driven in and around Tokyo. I would NOT want to teach anyone to drive over there! Not only are you driving on the other side of the road, but the driver's seat is opposite in the cars as well.


HA!! The Freehold Mall was precisely the one I was thinking of when I wrote that. Can you imagine trying to teach someone to drive there??? lol

Good luck! I'm sure she'll make you proud.

trauben
04-06-2009, 07:40 AM
I survived.

After sitting in the DMV offices for over two hours waiting to get the permit Saturday morning, I ended up taking her out to a hospital I once worked at.

There are lots of empty parking spaces in the outpatient clinical areas, and enough driving conditions around the entire complex with very little traffic to intimidate her. One big parking lot was completely empty so that was a good place for her to speed up and get a "feel" for the car and the steering wheel, etc. I will admit that about the first 15 minutes I made sure to sit on my hands as I could feel the "uneasiness" in the handling of the car. We had the classic 'head-jerking' stops, but then the feel of the car changed as she kept driving. It began to feel very steady and confident. We stayed in the parking lot the first day, and then Sunday we went again for another hour. This time she was driving around the complex with other traffic around her. She's picking this up really quick and confidently. Whew! But the most she's got the car up to has been 20mph. LOL I have yet to see how she does on main roads and with plenty of traffic.

I did set down SOLID rules about driving. NO CELL PHONE ON IN THE CAR when behind the wheel. I made that part of her routine for beginning the car; adjust driver's seats, windows, steering wheel, turn on head lights, turn off cell phone.......etc. She's not addicted to the thing that much anyway, but if she wants to drive my car thats the rules.

Boy it's different when it's your child you're teaching!

lamberts-lost-tooth, I'll be thinking of you! :wave: You'll be up next to the plate. You're going to have to let me know how you're doing! We'll be going through this together and eventually be able to get to where devilsdancefloor is.

What would be more difficult? Teaching a boy or teaching a girl? One may want the 'need for speed' whereas the other? My daughter luckily is not the 'giddy' 'gossipy' 'giggly' type. She's grounded, mature and serious when in serious matters so I think I luck out in that department. So maybe this is just more about the personality rather than the gender?