PDA

View Full Version : Comp. Techies.. give me some help here.


Preacher
04-29-2009, 02:33 AM
Ok.

So I am back to the place where I am going to have to buy a new computer.

I have a few choices... However, here is one I am seriously thinking about.


Building my own computer. I have never done it before. I have installed memory and also installed a video card before.

I have done a little research concerning CPU's, Motherboards, etc, and want 1333FBS at the minimum and what may be a quad 2 or an I7 chip, however, as I have read around, I am not too impressed with the I7's yet.

I also want a 10,000 RPM hard drive (willing to have smaller drive for the speed as I have about 3 external hardrives laying around that I can attach for secondary files).

Lastly, I am looking at a 3 monitor flat screen setup.

Now, I know that I can build it, but I want to hear from those of you who know hardware. . . is it worth building it, or should I buy a prebuilt one? After all, I am going to have to buy windows for it as well, including Office. I can't budge on that as I need the OS for some of the work I do at school.

So what do you think? Is it worth it? and how inexpensive do you think I can build this things sans monitors.

MasterOfPuppets
04-29-2009, 04:17 AM
I have installed memory and also installed a video card before.



http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/880/chimpcomputer.jpg (http://img521.imageshack.us/my.php?image=chimpcomputer.jpg)

:rofl:

Preacher
04-29-2009, 05:49 AM
http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/880/chimpcomputer.jpg (http://img521.imageshack.us/my.php?image=chimpcomputer.jpg)

:rofl:

:buttkick:

:chuckle:

Steelman16
04-29-2009, 07:11 AM
:toofunny: @ pic


Building your own computer is the best way to go IMO. I built mine, and you get more quality for less money than the pre-built package systems. (except maybe alienware)

The two most important questions though, are;

1. What is your budget?
2. What do you plan on using the computer for...gaming, audio/video editing, graphic editing, etc?

:thumbsup:

GBMelBlount
04-29-2009, 07:47 AM
Good luck Preach!

Computers are such a commodity these days. Personally I would only consider doing that if I really enjoyed it and had the time........or didn't sleep a lot....

Also, if you have component compatibility issues, is it possible tech support could be more problematic? Could one component manufacturer blame a compatibility problem on the other component manufacturers and not help you?

Also, will your software be more expensive if it isn't bundled with a plug & play computer?

That being said, it sounds like it could REALLY be a lot of fun!

Again, good luck and keep us posted! :thumbsup:

X-Terminator
04-29-2009, 08:04 AM
Ok.

So I am back to the place where I am going to have to buy a new computer.

I have a few choices... However, here is one I am seriously thinking about.


Building my own computer. I have never done it before. I have installed memory and also installed a video card before.

I have done a little research concerning CPU's, Motherboards, etc, and want 1333FBS at the minimum and what may be a quad 2 or an I7 chip, however, as I have read around, I am not too impressed with the I7's yet.

I also want a 10,000 RPM hard drive (willing to have smaller drive for the speed as I have about 3 external hardrives laying around that I can attach for secondary files).

Lastly, I am looking at a 3 monitor flat screen setup.

Now, I know that I can build it, but I want to hear from those of you who know hardware. . . is it worth building it, or should I buy a prebuilt one? After all, I am going to have to buy windows for it as well, including Office. I can't budge on that as I need the OS for some of the work I do at school.

So what do you think? Is it worth it? and how inexpensive do you think I can build this things sans monitors.

It would be cheaper to build it yourself, no question, especially for the setup you described. Plus, you have the added benefit of putting exactly what you want on the PC as far as software and not be stuck with a bunch of preloaded crap and no included copy of the OS in some cases. I'd recommend www.pricewatch.com to look for good deals. There are tons of vendors there based in CA, so that'll be good for you. If you do buy from there, pay close attention to the ratings and feedback - never buy from a vendor with less than a 4-star rating. It's similar to eBay and never buying from anyone with less than a 98% positive rating. If you don't want to go that route and prefer a nationally-known vendor, I'd give Newegg.com or tigerdirect.com a shot. Since you want a 10,000 RPM drive, most run on SCSI, but they do make them for the SATA 300 interface as well. And they're relatively inexpensive to boot. It will cost you a little bit of money because you need a motherboard capable of running 2 dual-port video cards and the video cards themselves, but it'll still be way cheaper to build it yourself.

Also, I'd recommend the Core 2 Quad processor - I'm not all that impressed with the i7's either.

MACH1
04-29-2009, 10:18 AM
Here's a couple places to checkout for pieces and parts. Lots of stuff to choose from at reasonable prices. And I think they have a "how to" section.

Mwave (http://www.mwave.com/mwave/Index.hmx?)

directron (http://www.directron.com/index.html)

SteelersinCA
04-29-2009, 11:51 AM
Building a PC is easy, it's so plug n play now. I built 3 PCs this year for myself and various other people. Never ahd done it before, but it was no problem. I recommend newegg.com. I was really happy with their service and prices.

Of the 3 I built 2 were Core 2 extreme and mine was an i7. I love the i7, great processor. I have an evga mb with SLI'd vid cards on the i7 and it flies. It's OC'd to 3.8 on air cooling, that alone is good enough for an i7 to me.

pitt
04-29-2009, 02:21 PM
tigerdirect.com will probably have all the components you need. I've bought alot of computer parts from them.

DoubleSh0t
04-29-2009, 02:31 PM
Build your own. These two sites are the best place to get parts:

www.newegg.com
www.tigerdirect.com

Steelman16
04-29-2009, 03:08 PM
newegg is the best IMO.

Preacher
04-29-2009, 03:40 PM
Thanks all.

I am working on putting together a list right now. When I get it all put together... do any of you mind if I put it here and get your comments on it... advice on going this way or that way?

Steelman16
04-29-2009, 03:44 PM
Thanks all.

I am working on putting together a list right now. When I get it all put together... do any of you mind if I put it here and get your comments on it... advice on going this way or that way?

Definitely do so! That's how I did mine; put out my parts lists and people gave their comments and advice.

:thumbsup:

MasterOfPuppets
04-29-2009, 05:18 PM
Thanks all.

I am working on putting together a list right now. When I get it all put together... do any of you mind if I put it here and get your comments on it... advice on going this way or that way?
hey your welcome preach !!! if ya need any help installing a sound card, i know just the guy.....


http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/5431/geekmonkey.jpg (http://img411.imageshack.us/my.php?image=geekmonkey.jpg)


:toofunny:

X-Terminator
04-29-2009, 05:52 PM
Thanks all.

I am working on putting together a list right now. When I get it all put together... do any of you mind if I put it here and get your comments on it... advice on going this way or that way?

No problem - I'll give you the best advice I can :thumbsup:

Preacher
04-29-2009, 06:17 PM
Ok....

Is it better to go with 16 gig of ram /800 and a 2 lagtime... or 16 gig of ram /1200 (or so) with 4-6 lag time?

Also, of these processors, which one would you choose? This one (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115130) or the tad bit slower (and less expensive) this one (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115041)

Also, I am thinking about going with a card that has the Nvidia 9000 series north bus on it and driving my video right off the card. However, settling on the CPU chip will start to narrow these other questions for me.

X-Terminator
04-29-2009, 07:27 PM
Ok....

Is it better to go with 16 gig of ram /800 and a 2 lagtime... or 16 gig of ram /1200 (or so) with 4-6 lag time?

Also, of these processors, which one would you choose? This one (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115130) or the tad bit slower (and less expensive) this one (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115041)

Also, I am thinking about going with a card that has the Nvidia 9000 series north bus on it and driving my video right off the card. However, settling on the CPU chip will start to narrow these other questions for me.

The 1200 has been known to be buggy and has a high failure rate, so I'd go with PC2-8500 RAM (1066 MHz). You should be able to get away with the slightly slower quad core with 16GB of that RAM. As for the video card, I personally am partial to the Radeon HD series, but that's just me. Everyone has their preference. The Nvidia 9000 should more than do the job for you.

SteelersinCA
04-29-2009, 08:31 PM
I'm running dual NVidia 280s as my video card. I'm not real sure that you are going to see too much benefit to 16 gig of Ram vs 6gig. Maybe if you are running graphic intensive programs, but I'm guessing if you are considering using the onboard chip for vid that's not the case.

I would recommend evga.com forums to get some ideas. There are some great discussions on there about the amount of RAM you really need and the quad cores vs the i7.

I think you will be disappointed you didn't go for the i7 if you are really considering building a bleeding edge machine.

http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.asp?m=100588805 RAM discussion
http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.asp?m=100596932 CPU discussion

If you are running 3 monitors, you should spend the $$ on good vid cards. If you want to Xfire or SLI your vid cards, i7 is the way to go.

Preacher
04-29-2009, 10:43 PM
I'm running dual NVidia 280s as my video card. I'm not real sure that you are going to see too much benefit to 16 gig of Ram vs 6gig. Maybe if you are running graphic intensive programs, but I'm guessing if you are considering using the onboard chip for vid that's not the case.

I would recommend evga.com forums to get some ideas. There are some great discussions on there about the amount of RAM you really need and the quad cores vs the i7.

I think you will be disappointed you didn't go for the i7 if you are really considering building a bleeding edge machine.

http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.asp?m=100588805 RAM discussion
http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.asp?m=100596932 CPU discussion

If you are running 3 monitors, you should spend the $$ on good vid cards. If you want to Xfire or SLI your vid cards, i7 is the way to go.

Thanks... I forgot to say,

I am using this system for

1. video conversion (converting things for church service, including youtube clips) and later, making video's to download from our services.

2. I have a MASSIVE CPU hog of a program known as Logos digital library. It doesn't say it is massive, but it really chews up the CPU. I do so much work in it and searches that I want something cutting edge to handle it (basically, I am impatient!)

3. I may get into computer gaming, as my game consol is QUITE old. However, with Madden not available for the PC, I might be second guessing that choice.

For those reasons, The first reason is what makes me think I need a WHOLE lot of ram. The second is what makes me think that quad core will be better.

But I don't know enough... thanks to all for your help, and KEEP IT COMING.

SteelersinCA
04-29-2009, 10:54 PM
I believe your video cards might help with that as well. I think you would be safe with 6 gig of RAM and taking that extra $$ saved on the 10gig of RAM and getting some video cards with significant RAM. Feel free to post in the evga forums though, I don't know much about the program but someone might.

Preacher
04-30-2009, 06:10 AM
I think you all are right about memory. I decided to keep my task manager running to watch the CUP speed and the memory usage. I have a single gig of memory right now, and I am not coming CLOSE to using it all up .

However, I have a dual core 2. something laptop from Dell, and I am topping out at 60 percent computing speed just for simple searches in my software. When I try to use a second app while it is searching... I surge to 100 %.

Yep... I think I need to bump up the processer and front bus speed more than worry about ram.

Does that sound about right to you all?

If that is true, the I7 is a better math processor, though the quad core runs frame rates better from what I have researched. Does that mean I should give the I7 another look?

SteelersinCA
04-30-2009, 10:08 AM
In a single GPU system, the quad core is on par with the i7. The other thing you might want to look into is some sort of RAID setup. It might help you search faster with a RAID 1 setup, I think it's 1, might be 0.

It looks like you have several things going on, Preach. You need some oomph for video editing, which would be CPU and GPU. Then you have a large program that is a bear to search. You can certainly get a velociraptor (10K RPM HDD) or 2 for a RAID set up, you can try a cheaper alternative of buying a 10k HDD for the OS and a 1TB HDD or above for your Data.

Most systems top out at 6gig of RAM being useful now, even the top of the line i7's. There are obvious exceptions for graphic intense programs, but it sounds like your Logos program is what's hogging your system. You might also want to consider that your HDD in the laptop is compromised, how old is it? My laptop HDD is going bad and it is slower than molasses even though I reformatted it.

I'd give everything a good look over again and again!

X-Terminator
04-30-2009, 10:09 AM
I have to agree with SteelersinCA here - for what you want to do, skim a bit on the RAM and spend the extra cash on the video cards with at least 512MB of RAM on each card, though I'd recommend 1GB on each if you can afford it. And yes, give the i7 another look. You really can't go wrong with it or the core 2 quad. It really depends on how much you're willing to plunk down.

Steelman16
04-30-2009, 10:21 AM
IMO, RAM really only comes into major play when you're choosing your OS. Vista is a hog, and I wouldn't recommend it. XP Pro is the way to go.

Vista needs about 4GB's of RAM to run properly and at its intended level.

But, first things first. :wink02:

From what I've read and heard, the i7's are fantastic processors.

As far as GFX cards, I recently bought an EVGA nVidia 9500 GT series 1GB GFX card, and am really impressed with it. All told, I spend about $80 on newegg. (including S&H) If I had the money, I would have bought two so I could run a dual system.

SteelersinCA
04-30-2009, 10:27 AM
I run Vista on my system and find it superior to XP. It's all about what you want to do. If you have the budget to put 4 gig of RAM in get vista, if you don't, don't get it. Windows 7 is coming out soon anyway.

X-Terminator
04-30-2009, 10:31 AM
IMO, RAM really only comes into major play when you're choosing your OS. Vista is a hog, and I wouldn't recommend it. XP Pro is the way to go.

Vista needs about 4GB's of RAM to run properly and at its intended level.

But, first things first. :wink02:

From what I've read and heard, the i7's are fantastic processors.

As far as GFX cards, I recently bought an EVGA nVidia 9500 GT series 1GB GFX card, and am really impressed with it. All told, I spend about $80 on newegg. (including S&H) If I had the money, I would have bought two so I could run a dual system.

Vista doesn't necessarily need 4GB of RAM to run properly - you can also increase the size of your page file and create other page files on other drives (if available) to take some of the work off the processor. My desktop PC at home has 2GB of RAM, but I have a total of 16GB in page files on my 4 HDDs, and Vista runs nice and smooth. I still want to upgrade to at least 4GB so I can reclaim some of that HD space, though.

BTW, thanks for the heads-up on video cards - I'm currently using the onboard video (Radeon HD2100, which isn't too bad for onboard video), but would rather have a separate card so I can use the full amount of RAM.

SteelersinCA
04-30-2009, 10:34 AM
Yeah, X you can get a great video card for cheap. You will notice an incredible difference with a stand alone GPU.

Steelman16
04-30-2009, 10:42 AM
I run Vista on my system and find it superior to XP. It's all about what you want to do. If you have the budget to put 4 gig of RAM in get vista, if you don't, don't get it. Windows 7 is coming out soon anyway.

I'm Vista's biggest hater, so I'm probably not the best to talk to. :laughing:

I am looking forward to W7 though, hopefully it does a good job of combing XP with Vista.

One of my main reasons at the time for sticking with XP was that I have a lot of older software that works great and is perfect for what I do, but wouldn't be compatible with Vista. However, I've recently heard that you can change certain settings in Vista to make things compatible.

Yeah, X you can get a great video card for cheap. You will notice an incredible difference with a stand alone GPU.

Totally agree. I was surprised about how inexpensive GFX cards have become...for 80 bucks, it's probably one of the better parts in my machine...that cost me $1350 three years ago. :banging:

X-Terminator
04-30-2009, 12:35 PM
Totally agree. I was surprised about how inexpensive GFX cards have become...for 80 bucks, it's probably one of the better parts in my machine...that cost me $1350 three years ago. :banging:

http://www.pricewatch.com/video_cards/pci_1gb-0.htm

I swear, just a few months ago a 1GB video card cost well over $300. Now I can pick one up for less than 70 bucks. Unbelievable!

SteelersinCA
04-30-2009, 01:19 PM
DDR3 is the new GPU hotness so DDR2 is going to come down. Just splurge on the $500 and get a 295!!!

X-Terminator
04-30-2009, 01:25 PM
DDR3 is the new GPU hotness so DDR2 is going to come down. Just splurge on the $500 and get a 295!!!

I would if I could. But renewing my Penguins' season tickets are eating a hole in my budget, and I ain't giving those up for a $500 video card! :chuckle: Besides, my everyday needs doesn't justify spending that much money on a video card.

steelreserve
04-30-2009, 02:01 PM
Also, of these processors, which one would you choose? This one (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115130) or the tad bit slower (and less expensive) this one (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115041)

ooh, it's too bad I didn't see this thread earlier; I just built my own machine a few months ago using the Q9550. I have to say, it's an AWESOME CPU and three years from now, you'll be glad you spent the extra money. The i7 is not worth it in my opinion unless you're planning on replacing the processor in a couple years. The i7's they have now are not any better than the best quad cores and they cost a lot more, although I'm sure by 2011 or so, they'll be a noticeable step up in performance.

I'd also definitely recommend getting a motherboard that supports DDR3 memory -- it's going to be worth it. DDR3 has dropped in price by almost half since I built my machine, and it's getting to the point where latency is not an issue. In a year or so, you'll be kicking yourself if you're using DDR2 because your machine will be at a dead-end for upgrading capacity, and DDR3 memory will basically be twice as good for about the same price.

For a graphics card, just make sure it supports DirectX 10 or better and will fit in your motherboard. oh, and make sure you get a big power supply (at least 600W) to run everything, and some good case fans to blow all that heat out.

If it helps at all, here's what I built -- total cost was about $1,000 by getting what I could on sale, and it should be able to easily handle any game or program that comes out in the next five years or so:

CPU: Intel Q9550 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115041)
Motherboard: Intel DP45SG (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813121348R)
RAM: 4GB Patriot DDR3 7-7-7 10666 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820220332) (may expand to 8GB later)
Hard drive: Western Digital Velociraptor 1000rpm 300GB (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136322)
Power supply: Zalman 850W (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817379007)
Graphics card: Radeon HD4870 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102748R)
CPU cooler: Thermaltake Silent 775 (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2844210&CatId=1588) (but would recommend a Zalman CPU fan/heatsink if you can get it to fit)
Case fans: 3x Thermaltake 72.5CFM (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=925067&CatId=801), 1x Rexus 42CFM (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835705019)

Plus a CD_RW drive and card reader, which are about a dime a dozen.

X-Terminator
04-30-2009, 02:33 PM
ooh, it's too bad I didn't see this thread earlier; I just built my own machine a few months ago using the Q9550. I have to say, it's an AWESOME CPU and three years from now, you'll be glad you spent the extra money. The i7 is not worth it in my opinion unless you're planning on replacing the processor in a couple years. The i7's they have now are not any better than the best quad cores and they cost a lot more, although I'm sure by 2011 or so, they'll be a noticeable step up in performance.

I'd also definitely recommend getting a motherboard that supports DDR3 memory -- it's going to be worth it. DDR3 has dropped in price by almost half since I built my machine, and it's getting to the point where latency is not an issue. In a year or so, you'll be kicking yourself if you're using DDR2 because your machine will be at a dead-end for upgrading capacity, and DDR3 memory will basically be twice as good for about the same price.

For a graphics card, just make sure it supports DirectX 10 or better and will fit in your motherboard. oh, and make sure you get a big power supply (at least 600W) to run everything, and some good case fans to blow all that heat out.

If it helps at all, here's what I built -- total cost was about $1,000 by getting what I could on sale, and it should be able to easily handle any game or program that comes out in the next five years or so:

CPU: Intel Q9550 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115041)
Motherboard: Intel DP45SG (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813121348R)
RAM: 4GB Patriot DDR3 7-7-7 10666 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820220332) (may expand to 8GB later)
Hard drive: Western Digital Velociraptor 1000rpm 300GB (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136322)
Power supply: Zalman 850W (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817379007)
Graphics card: Radeon HD4870 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102748R)
CPU cooler: Thermaltake Silent 775 (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2844210&CatId=1588) (but would recommend a Zalman CPU fan/heatsink if you can get it to fit)
Case fans: 3x Thermaltake 72.5CFM (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=925067&CatId=801), 1x Rexus 42CFM (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835705019)

Plus a CD_RW drive and card reader, which are about a dime a dozen.

Now that is a sweet system! Man, what I would do if I had an extra thousand bucks lying around. My system is garbage compared to that, but hey, it does what I need.

SteelersinCA
04-30-2009, 03:30 PM
I would if I could. But renewing my Penguins' season tickets are eating a hole in my budget, and I ain't giving those up for a $500 video card! :chuckle: Besides, my everyday needs doesn't justify spending that much money on a video card.

Yeah I understand that, unless you are really into FPS or something like that with gaming, a DDR2 will push it just fine!

Here's a link to the my CPU, the pictures aren't updated, since then I've added another HDD and GPU.

http://www.evga.com/community/modsrigs/comment.asp?sysid=14178

Preacher
04-30-2009, 04:49 PM
Keep in the info coming...


Am I right for trying to shy away from high latency rates on DDR 3 ram? Or is it not as much of an issue if they are 1033 or 1300 speeds?

steelreserve
04-30-2009, 06:38 PM
Keep in the info coming...


Am I right for trying to shy away from high latency rates on DDR 3 ram? Or is it not as much of an issue if they are 1033 or 1300 speeds?

You're ALWAYS better off getting the lowest latency you can. Although you're correct that at higher clock speeds, latency makes slightly less of a difference.

Basically, the latency is measured in clock cycles, and the length of a cycle is inverse to the clock speed. So to get the total response time, you just divide the clock speed by the latency. In other words, a latency of 8 at a 1600 clock speed is exactly the same thing as a latency of 4 at an 800 clock speed, which is the same as a latency of 2 at a 400 clock speed, and so on.

For DDR3, I'd still stay away from anything with an 8 or 9 latency if you can help it. They make 2GB sticks with a latency of 7 or even 6 for the same price. If you can fit it in your slots, this (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=2010170147+1052129233+1052526967+50001550&Configurator=&Subcategory=147&description=&Ntk=&SpeTabStoreType=&srchInDesc=) is a good example.

Of course, if you get to the very very high end of speed (currently something like this (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=2010170147+1052129233+105243163+1052528354&Configurator=&Subcategory=147&description=&Ntk=&SpeTabStoreType=&srchInDesc=)) you can expect to pay a premium no matter what, and you'd also better be sure your motherboard is equipped for it.

The important thing to take away from this is that DDR3 really is the way to go, because eventually they'll get the latency down to roughly the same as DDR2, and if you're starting out at a higher clock speed like DDR3-1333 instead of DDR2-667, you'll be much better off. Try to get a motherboard that supports at least DDR3-1333. That seems to be about the current standard for just high-end enough without being super-expensive.

tony hipchest
04-30-2009, 06:47 PM
i have NO idea what anyone just said in this thread. :noidea:

.....so MOP thanks for the monkey pictures! :toofunny::toofunny::toofunny:

:applaudit:














I have installed memory and also installed a video card before.


http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/880/chimpcomputer.jpg (http://img521.imageshack.us/my.php?image=chimpcomputer.jpg)

:rofl:

that caught me off guard. i havent laughed that hard at a post in a while. (looks just like preach! ) :wink02: and i do know chimps aint monkeys.

Preacher
05-01-2009, 03:21 AM
Alright... TALK TO ME... How does this look?


http://c1.neweggimages.com/ProductImageCompressAll/27-136-153-03.jpg
LG 22X DVD±R DVD Burner with LightScribe Black SATA Model GH22LS30 - OEM (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827136153)

$25.99 . .
http://c1.neweggimages.com/ProductImageCompressAll/22-136-296-01.jpg
Western Digital VelociRaptor WD1500HLFS 150GB 10000 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Hard Drive (bare drive) - OEM (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136296)
http://c1.neweggimages.com/ProductImageCompressAll/24-009-127-04.jpg
Acer X193W+BD Black 19" 5ms Widescreen LCD Monitor - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824009127) $419.97$359.97($119.99each) . .
http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/14-187-030-TS?$S60$
SPARKLE SFPX98GT512D3 GeForce 9800 GT 512MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported Video Card - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814187030)

$109.99 . .
http://c1.neweggimages.com/ProductImageCompressAll/20-227-388-08.jpg
OCZ XMP Ready Series 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Triple Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model OCZ3X1600LV6GK - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227388)
$20.00 Mail-in Rebate (http://images10.newegg.com/UploadFilesForNewegg/rebate/SH/OCZ20-227-388Apr23Apr3009jh28.pdf) $125.99$92.99 . .
http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-186-163-TS?$S60$
Foxconn BloodRage LGA 1366 Intel X58 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813186163) Item #: N82E16813186163Return Policy: Limited Non-Refundable 30-Day Return Policy (http://www.newegg.com/HelpInfo/ReturnPolicy.aspx#3)
$10.00 Mail-in Rebate (http://images10.newegg.com/uploadfilesfornewegg/rebate/SH/FOXCONN13-186-163Apr8Apr3009lc77.pdf) $289.99 . .
http://c1.neweggimages.com/ProductImageCompressAll/19-115-201-02.jpg
Intel Core i7 940 Nehalem 2.93GHz LGA 1366 130W Quad-Core Processor Model BX80601940 - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115201)
$559.99$544.99 . .
http://c1.neweggimages.com/ProductImageCompressAll/32-116-469-01.jpg
Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium SP1 - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116469) Item #: N82E16832116469Return Policy: Software Return Policy (http://www.newegg.com/HelpInfo/ReturnPolicy.aspx#9)

$222.99 . . http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/11-103-011-TS?$S60$http://c1.neweggimages.com/ProductImageCompressAll/17-189-011-14.jpg


XCLIO Windtunnel Fully Black Finish 1.0 mm SECC Chassis ATX Full Tower Computer Case - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.187862)
XCLIO GREATPOWER X14S4P4 750W ATX12V SLI Certified CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.187862)


I haven't checked compatibility of the Ram yet.. though it is DDR3 with the right clocking. BUt I just want to know if I am on the right track here. It is a tad bit too expensive at this point, but I figure I can cut one or two things down a bit as well as shop around for some better prices.

Also, I figure the power is overboard. I really don't know what I am doing with that, so some help would be apppreciated.

MasterOfPuppets
05-01-2009, 03:24 AM
preacher if your lookin for speakers, here's a fairly cheap set i'd recommend.....
http://reviews.cnet.com/pc-speakers/z-2300-2-1/4505-3179_7-30993080.html?tag=contentMain;contentBody

SteelersinCA
05-01-2009, 03:42 AM
Preacher try the Cooler Master HAF32, fantastic case for cheap. Also you can get the OEM Vista build for $99, so that will save you some money there. Everything else looks good.

MasterOfPuppets
05-01-2009, 03:50 AM
preacher, i don't know how much gaming your going to be doing, but some of the newer games require 1GB on the video card.

X-Terminator
05-01-2009, 08:37 AM
Alright... TALK TO ME... How does this look?



I haven't checked compatibility of the Ram yet.. though it is DDR3 with the right clocking. BUt I just want to know if I am on the right track here. It is a tad bit too expensive at this point, but I figure I can cut one or two things down a bit as well as shop around for some better prices.

Also, I figure the power is overboard. I really don't know what I am doing with that, so some help would be apppreciated.

Are you talking about the PSU? 750W is just fine for what you are running. I'd also consider upgrading to a 1GB video card if you plan on doing some gaming. Otherwise, I think it's a great setup.

steelreserve
05-01-2009, 01:25 PM
Well, if you wanted top-of-the-line, you're doing it right. That looks like a totally kickass system.

Couple little things I'd have suggestions for ... as others have said, a 1GB video card is going to be better than 512, so I'd opt for that if you can. Also, 750W is definitely not overkill for a power supply on a system like this; 700 is pretty much the bare minimum you want to risk having with a high-end machine. Always err on the side of having too much capacity, because the alternative is disastrous.

Looks like a pretty good motherboard, but long-term, you might consider getting one that can support 24GB instead of 12GB. This one (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131386) is actually cheaper than the one you've got, but it has the same specs and supports twice as much memory, and at faster clock speeds (unless you want to get into overclocking the memory, which I wouldn't try yet). You'd give up one PCIe 16x2.0 slot, but I have no idea why you'd need four of them anyway. It's also only has 6 USB ports in the back instead of 8, but there are so many ways to split USB ports that who cares.

You got a real steal on the DDR3, you ought to be happy with that.

You're going to be pissed pretty soon if you don't get a bigger hard drive. Vista and the other basic programs have gotten so huge that they'll eat up half of your hard drive space on the first day. If you're going to spend this kind of money, the 300GB is the much better option.

Last thing: With a high-end processor like that, you will probably want a better CPU fan/heatsink than the standard Intel one that comes in the box. Id' recommend one of these monsters if you can fit them (keep in mind, the heatsink stands vertically above the CPU by about 6 inches):

Zalman 9900 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835118046)
Masscool 92mm (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835150082)

or if not, you can decrease in size with one of these until you find something that fits.

Zalman 9700 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835118019)
Zalman 9500 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835118003)

Zalman definitely makes the best CPU coolers, but they're all so damn huge. I couldn't fit one in my case.


Oh, and above all else: If you are assembling this yourself in a metal case, GET A PAIR OF ANTI-STATIC GLOVES AND A GROUNDING CLIP, AND LOOK UP HOW TO DO THAT RIGHT. You do not want to fry the CPU, motherboard or graphics card with static electricity as you're installing them, so make sure you're grounded. I wouldn't wear shoes while putting it together either, for the same reason.

SteelersinCA
05-01-2009, 01:31 PM
I think he said he had 4 HDDs lying around, not sure the sizes though. I agree with Steelreserve on the power supply, especially if you ever SLI video cards, can be a big drain on the power and the multiple HDDs.

X-Terminator
05-01-2009, 02:03 PM
Oh, and above all else: If you are assembling this yourself in a metal case, GET A PAIR OF ANTI-STATIC GLOVES AND A GROUNDING CLIP, AND LOOK UP HOW TO DO THAT RIGHT. You do not want to fry the CPU, motherboard or graphics card with static electricity as you're installing them, so make sure you're grounded. I wouldn't wear shoes while putting it together either, for the same reason.

Somebody should tell that to the PC and UNIX Engineering groups where I work. None of them ever use anti-static gloves or grounding clips whenever they work on machines. And we're talking about several thousand dollar servers in many cases! I never, ever work in a machine or put one together without at least a grounding clip. I learned my lesson years ago when I fried a brand new motherboard putting together my very first PC, so like you, I can't stress this enough.

Steelman16
05-01-2009, 02:23 PM
I agree with SteelReserve...you can't have enough power. 750 should be perfect. I'm running 580 watts, and it's just enough for my system. I use Hiper PSU's, highly recommended.

And yes! GET A GROUNDING CLIP! I learned that the hard way too... :doh:

43Hitman
05-01-2009, 02:44 PM
Ok.

So I am back to the place where I am going to have to buy a new computer.

I have a few choices... However, here is one I am seriously thinking about.


Building my own computer. I have never done it before. I have installed memory and also installed a video card before.

I have done a little research concerning CPU's, Motherboards, etc, and want 1333FBS at the minimum and what may be a quad 2 or an I7 chip, however, as I have read around, I am not too impressed with the I7's yet.

I also want a 10,000 RPM hard drive (willing to have smaller drive for the speed as I have about 3 external hardrives laying around that I can attach for secondary files).

Lastly, I am looking at a 3 monitor flat screen setup.

Now, I know that I can build it, but I want to hear from those of you who know hardware. . . is it worth building it, or should I buy a prebuilt one? After all, I am going to have to buy windows for it as well, including Office. I can't budge on that as I need the OS for some of the work I do at school.

So what do you think? Is it worth it? and how inexpensive do you think I can build this things sans monitors.
Jumping into this conversation really late, but for what it's worth:
I built my own computer last year, and it was pretty simple. I, like you, had only installed upgrades like video cards and ram. I was surprised at how easy it can be. I did lots of research at Newegg.com on what was compatible with what. I also read lots of reviews of certain products, to make sure they would be compatible with my core idea. I will never buy another pre-built machine after building this one. I saved about 600 dollars doing it myself. If you have another computer hooked up to the internet while building your new one, it's even easier to do. Cause if you get stuck or are unsure of something, you can just google it.

Preacher
05-01-2009, 04:11 PM
Thanks everyone.

I am going to put together another list with the the Quad 4 9650 to check out pricing differences... then post that one here.

Then comes the big issue... MAKING THE CHOICE!

steelreserve
05-01-2009, 04:32 PM
You know, reading this thread made me go back and look at the price for the Q9650, and DAMN, has it come down.

When I put together my machine back in September, it was $319 for the Q9550 and almost $600 for the Q9650, which was the newest chip available at the time. Now it's $260 for the Q9550 and $300 for the Q9650. I guess getting the very latest chip to come off the line always costs about double the one that's been out for a couple months.

Preacher
05-01-2009, 08:43 PM
You know, reading this thread made me go back and look at the price for the Q9650, and DAMN, has it come down.

When I put together my machine back in September, it was $319 for the Q9550 and almost $600 for the Q9650, which was the newest chip available at the time. Now it's $260 for the Q9550 and $300 for the Q9650. I guess getting the very latest chip to come off the line always costs about double the one that's been out for a couple months.


Yeah, that is one issue I am having. I went and reconfigured the system with the 9650, and found I could do it for about 300 less. Not sure if 300 is worth it over the next 3 years.

Decisions decisions.

SteelersinCA
05-01-2009, 09:02 PM
No way go for the i7, did you look at the CoolerMaster HAF32?

steelreserve
05-02-2009, 04:23 AM
Yeah, that is one issue I am having. I went and reconfigured the system with the 9650, and found I could do it for about 300 less. Not sure if 300 is worth it over the next 3 years.

Decisions decisions.

Do not sweat the $300, especially when it's about a fifth of the overall cost. Go for the i7. With computers, if $300 can get you over a barrier to the next generation of technology, you will always be glad you spent it. Not just 3 years from now, either.

Put it this way, if you do nothing else to your rig ever, you'll still be thanking yourself in 3 years for spending the extra money. But if you want to, say, add RAM, replace a component, or overclock it to make it even better, you can keep the i7 machine you're talking about as an above-average piece of equipment five years from now, and at decreasing cost as time goes on. As long as you're over that initial technological hurdle.

The Q9650 and LGA775 socket technology just passed their max-out point a couple months ago -- in three years, it'll be like a Pentium 4 is today. You will cap out at 3Ghz processor speed instead of about 4.5-5 GHz equivalent. Your motherboard will only support 8GB of RAM at 1333 Ghz instead of 24GB at 2000 Ghz. In the next 3 years, you'll probably see 10,000rpm hard drives replaced by 15,000 as the standard for gaming (writing on the wall here (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=2010150014+1035507779&Configurator=&Subcategory=14&description=&Ntk=&SpeTabStoreType=&srchInDesc=)) and maybe something like 22,000rpm by the end of the i7's lifecycle. The current SATA-2 controller technology will be replaced with something new, either Serial SCSI or some yet-to-be-invented SATA-3, which will probably require you to get a new motherboard at some point..

The i7 and DDR3 will still work with that technology. The Q9650 and DDR2 will not. So definitely go for the i7.

And if money IS an issue, you know what? If you wait maybe 2 months, the current top-ranked i7 chip will come down from about $600 to $300-$350. The second-ranked i7 chip will come down to $300 or so, not much more than a Q9650. Trust me on this. Y

steelreserve
05-02-2009, 04:38 AM
No way go for the i7, did you look at the CoolerMaster HAF32?

Are you talking about the case? Because that's an awesome case.

Just my personal opinion, Coolermaster makes good cases and case fans, but every interior CPU fan/heatsink I've seen from them has been a piece of shit.

What kind of CPU cooler are you running in your system? It looks awesome, but it is f***ing MASSIVE. I usually swear by Zalman as the top internal cooler even after the space issues, but that thing looks like nothing I've ever seen.

SteelersinCA
05-02-2009, 07:56 AM
Yeah the HAF32 case, very nice case for the price imho. I'm using the Noctua NH-U12P. It's a beast, but no bigger tan the Zalman for the i7 or the V8. It keeps my cores in the upper 30s at idle @ 3.8ghz, pushes mid 70s at load. It's a champ.

Preacher
05-03-2009, 11:15 PM
Well, this thread was very appropriate.

Opened up my laptop this morning and my hard drive crashed. HARD. Couldn't even use the system restore/install cd.

Sadly, I had a paper on in that was due this coming tuesday.

No... It wasn't backed up... I know I know.. I have heard it from my wife all day.

Now I am 150 dollars poorer, but have the paper, and finishing up a reformat on an old computer so I can use it until I can build the new one.