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HometownGal
08-27-2009, 11:01 PM
WARNING!!!!

EXTREMELY GRAPHIC AND VIOLENT VIDEO

The only reason I am posting this video is to make fellow members and their children aware of the dangers and tragedies that can (and do) occur when texting/using a cell phone while driving.

I answer my cell phone rarely while driving but after viewing this video, I will NEVER use it again when operating a motor vehicle. :horror: Even those who view themselves as "tough" or "hardened" may need to keep a box of Kleenex handy while watching.


DGE8LzRaySk

nojobny
08-28-2009, 12:13 AM
Thanks for posting that. I saw that on FB the other day.

Problem is you may be the safest driver in the world but it doesn't help if some idiot hits you. That's what really scary

I saw a drunk driver once flying down the road, he clipped the back edge of this woman's Lexus just right and her car flipped in front of me 5 TIMES and landed on it's roof. OMG.. and he was in this little POS honda.

When the DA's office called me b/c I was a witness they told me it was because she was in a big car she survived.

I've also seen *real* pictures from an accident from someone texting and it was way worse than that PSA. There are just so many distractions today.

When will people realize its just not that important to speak to/text someone as soon as they call you. Let them wait. If you don't, they may be waiting forever.

NEPAsteeler
08-28-2009, 12:16 AM
Well, my cell phone is definitely staying INSIDE of my pocket while I'm driving from now on. :horror:

On a side note, this was kind of hard for me to watch because a very good friend of mine was in a very bad car accident two days ago and is now paralyzed from the waste down.

SteelersinCA
08-28-2009, 01:53 AM
Cell phone use while driving has been suggested to be worse than drunk driving by some recent studies, yet in states where it is illegal the punishment is merely a fine. Any guesses why that is? I'll give you a hint, MADD. I say we start a cell phone program and get rich.

Venom
08-28-2009, 07:15 AM
Its a great video . Here in NYC everyone talks on their cell phone . They couldnt care less about the $ 130.00 summons you will get if caught by the police .

stillers4me
08-28-2009, 07:17 AM
Cell phones, ipods, GPS systems, cd players, Big Macs....one is as bad as the other.

touchdownward
08-28-2009, 07:43 AM
If you have to use your cell while driving, buy a bluetooth. You can set them to answer automatically after two rings and can call anyone in your phone book by voice activation, completely hands free.

fansince'76
08-28-2009, 08:26 AM
I don't have a cell phone (hate the damn things), but I do have a company-issued Blackberry for when I am in the oncall rotation. I won't look at it if it goes off when I'm driving - I always wait until I have stopped the car.

HometownGal
08-28-2009, 08:32 AM
If you have to use your cell while driving, buy a bluetooth. You can set them to answer automatically after two rings and can call anyone in your phone book by voice activation, completely hands free.

I was with a friend of mine a few months ago who was using her bluetooth and she almost rear-ended the car in front of us because she was so engrossed in her conversation. I firmly believe that when you are driving, your concentration should be 100% on the road.

revefsreleets
08-28-2009, 09:30 AM
This is really just an updated version of the old "scared straight" drivers ed videos from the 40's-60's with a little better SPFX and production values. Some of those were SO over the top that they were unintentionally comical. This is at least handled seriously.

SteelMember
08-28-2009, 10:00 AM
I was with a friend of mine a few months ago who was using her bluetooth and she almost rear-ended the car in front of us because she was so engrossed in her conversation. I firmly believe that when you are driving, your concentration should be 100% on the road.

I agree. It has less to do with both of your hands being on the wheel, than the focus of the task at hand...operating heavy machinery.

SteelersinCA
08-28-2009, 10:31 AM
If you have to use your cell while driving, buy a bluetooth. You can set them to answer automatically after two rings and can call anyone in your phone book by voice activation, completely hands free.

I'll look for the study but it basically said ANY use of a cell phone is worse than drunk driving, including hands free.

SteelersinCA
08-28-2009, 10:35 AM
Here it is. http://www.unews.utah.edu/p/?r=062206-1

Drivers on Cell Phones Are as Bad as Drunks

June 29, 2006 -- Three years after the preliminary results first were presented at a scientific meeting and drew wide attention, University of Utah psychologists have published a study showing that motorists who talk on handheld or hands-free cellular phones are as impaired as drunken drivers.

"We found that people are as impaired when they drive and talk on a cell phone as they are when they drive intoxicated at the legal blood-alcohol limit” of 0.08 percent, which is the minimum level that defines illegal drunken driving in most U.S. states, says study co-author Frank Drews, an assistant professor of psychology. “If legislators really want to address driver distraction, then they should consider outlawing cell phone use while driving.”

Psychology Professor David Strayer, the study's lead author, adds: “Just like you put yourself and other people at risk when you drive drunk, you put yourself and others at risk when you use a cell phone and drive. The level of impairment is very similar.”

“Clearly the safest course of action is to not use a cell phone while driving,” concludes the study by Strayer, Drews and Dennis Crouch, a research associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology. The study was set for publication June 29 in the summer 2006 issue of Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

The study reinforced earlier research by Strayer and Drews showing that hands-free cell phones are just as distracting as handheld cell phones because the conversation itself – not just manipulation of a handheld phone – distracts drivers from road conditions.

Human Factors Editor Nancy J. Cooke praised the study: “Although we all have our suspicions about the dangers of cell phone use while driving, human factors research on driver safety helps us move beyond mere suspicions to scientific observations of driver behavior.”

The study first gained public notice after Strayer presented preliminary results in July 2003 in Park City, Utah, during the Second International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design. It took until now for the study to be completed, undergo review by other researchers and finally be published.

Key Findings: Different Driving Styles, Similar Impairment

Each of the study"s 40 participants “drove” a PatrolSim driving simulator four times: once each while undistracted, using a handheld cell phone, using a hands-free cell phone and while intoxicated to the 0.08 percent blood-alcohol level after drinking vodka and orange juice. Participants followed a simulated pace car that braked intermittently.

Both handheld and hands-free cell phones impaired driving, with no significant difference in the degree of impairment. That “calls into question driving regulations that prohibited handheld cell phones and permit hands-free cell phones,” the researchers write.

The study found that compared with undistracted drivers:

* Motorists who talked on either handheld or hands-free cell phones drove slightly slower, were 9 percent slower to hit the brakes, displayed 24 percent more variation in following distance as their attention switched between driving and conversing, were 19 percent slower to resume normal speed after braking and were more likely to crash. Three study participants rear-ended the pace car. All were talking on cell phones. None were drunk.
* Drivers drunk at the 0.08 percent blood-alcohol level drove a bit more slowly than both undistracted drivers and drivers using cell phones, yet more aggressively. They followed the pace car more closely, were twice as likely to brake only four seconds before a collision would have occurred, and hit their brakes with 23 percent more force. “Neither accident rates, nor reaction times to vehicles braking in front of the participant, nor recovery of lost speed following braking differed significantly” from undistracted drivers, the researchers write.

“Impairments associated with using a cell phone while driving can be as profound as those associated with driving while drunk,” they conclude.

Are Drunken Drivers Really Less Accident-Prone than Cell Phone Users?

Drews says the lack of accidents among the study’s drunken drivers was surprising. He and Strayer speculate that because simulated drives were conducted during mornings, participants who got drunk were well-rested and in the “up” phase of intoxication. In reality, 80 percent of all fatal alcohol-related accidents occur between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. when drunken drivers tend to be fatigued. Average blood-alcohol levels in those accidents are twice 0.08 percent. Forty percent of the roughly 42,000 annual U.S. traffic fatalities involve alcohol.

While none of the study’s intoxicated drivers crashed, their hard, late braking is “predictive of increased accident rates over the long run,” the researchers wrote.

One statistical analysis of the new and previous Utah studies showed cell phone users were 5.36 times more likely to get in an accident than undistracted drivers. Other studies have shown the risk is about the same as for drivers with a 0.08 blood-alcohol level.

Strayer says he expects criticism “suggesting that we are trivializing drunken-driving impairment, but it is anything but the case. We don't think people should drive while drunk, nor should they talk on their cell phone while driving.”

Drews says he and Strayer compared the impairment of motorists using cell phones to drivers with a 0.08 percent blood-alcohol level because they wanted to determine if the risk of driving while phoning was comparable to the drunken driving risk considered unacceptable.

“This study does not mean people should start driving drunk,” says Drews. “It means that driving while talking on a cell phone is as bad as or maybe worse than driving drunk, which is completely unacceptable and cannot be tolerated by society.”

University of Utah Cell Phone Research

Previous research by Strayer, Drews and colleagues include:

* A 2001 study showing that hands-free cell phones are just as distracting as handheld cell phones.
* A 2003 study showing that the reason is “inattention blindness,” in which motorists look directly at road conditions but don’t really see them because they are distracted by a cell phone conversation. And such drivers aren’t aware they are impaired.
* A 2005 study suggesting that when teenagers and young adults talk on cell phones while driving, their reaction times are as slow as those of elderly drivers.

The University of Utah psychologists conducted the alcohol study because a 1997 study by other researchers evaluated the cell phone records of 699 people involved in motor vehicle accidents and found one-fourth of them had used their phone in the 10 minutes before their accident – a four-fold increase in accidents compared with undistracted motorists.

Those researchers speculated there was a comparable risk from drunken driving and cell phone use while driving. So Strayer and Drews conducted a controlled laboratory study.

The study included 25 men and 15 women ages 22 to 34 who were social drinkers (three to five drinks per week) recruited via newspaper advertisements. Two-thirds used a cell phone while driving. Each participant was paid $100 for 10 hours in the study.

The driving simulator has a steering wheel, dashboard instruments and brake and gas pedals from a Ford Crown Victoria sedan. The driver is surrounded by three screens showing freeway scenes. Each simulated daylight freeway drive lasted 15 minutes. The pace car intermittently braked to mimic stop-and-go traffic. Drivers who fail to hit their brakes eventually rear-end the pace car. Other simulated vehicles occasionally passed in the left lane, giving the impression of steady traffic flow.

Each study participant drove the simulator during three sessions – undistracted, drunk or talking to a research assistant on a cell phone – each on a different day.

The simulator recorded driving speed, following distance, braking time and how long it would take to collide with the pace car if brakes were not used.

The study was funded by a $25,000 grant from the Federal Aviation Administration – which is interested in impaired attention among pilots – and by Strayer’s and Drews’ salaries. The Utah Highway Patrol loaned the researchers a device to measure blood-alcohol levels.

Driving while Distracted: A Growing Problem

The researchers cited figures from the Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association indicating that more than 100 million U.S. motorists use cell phones while driving. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration estimates that at any given moment during daylight hours, 8 percent of all drivers are talking on a cell phone.

“Fortunately, the percentage of drunk drivers at any time is much lower,” Drews says. “So it means the risk of talking on a cell phone and driving is probably much higher than driving intoxicated because more people are talking on cell phones while driving than are driving drunk.” The main reason there are not more accidents is that “92 percent of drivers are not on a cell phone and are compensating for drivers on cell phones,” he adds.

Cell phone use is far from the only distraction for motorists. The researchers cite talking to passengers, eating, drinking, lighting cigarettes, applying makeup and listening to the radio as the “old standards” of driver distraction.

SteelCityMan786
08-28-2009, 11:19 AM
Lucky for me I wouldn't pull that crap.

HometownGal
08-28-2009, 11:07 PM
Here it is. http://www.unews.utah.edu/p/?r=062206-1


Thank you for posting that, SteelersinCA. Along with the video, that article is definitely an eye-opener. :horror:

Preacher
08-29-2009, 05:18 AM
What I find interesting... and would want them to test for, is if talking on a cell phone is any more distracting then being in a conversation with the person next to you.

I have always thought that conversing with the person next to you is more dangerous than a cell phone, because most humans want eye-contact... which means you look over at them once in a while.

:noidea:

I was hoping this study tested for that. But I guess not.

touchdownward
08-29-2009, 11:06 AM
I was with a friend of mine a few months ago who was using her bluetooth and she almost rear-ended the car in front of us because she was so engrossed in her conversation. I firmly believe that when you are driving, your concentration should be 100% on the road.
A good rule of thumb is if you can't walk and chew gum at the same time, then you probably shouldn't use a hands free cell device and drive. (j/king). :chuckle:

I see your point about the distraction factor.

El-Gonzo Jackson
08-29-2009, 12:08 PM
What I find interesting... and would want them to test for, is if talking on a cell phone is any more distracting then being in a conversation with the person next to you.
.

:applaudit: Exactly my thoughts!!!

If talking on a bluetooth headset is banned, then talking to your passengers should also be banned. Its basically the same thing. Next somebody is gonna try and regulate what hand people wipe their azz with. :banging:

beSteelmyheart
08-29-2009, 04:13 PM
Every single time somebody is doing something stupid on the road I'll look over & sure enough, they have a phone stuck to their ear or they are doing something with a phone. I'm beyond sick of it.

sixstringlass
08-29-2009, 04:24 PM
In my neighboring state of Washington, they've made talking on a cell phone a ticketing offense, yet texting while driving is still legal. Go figure.

HometownGal
08-30-2009, 08:47 AM
Every single time somebody is doing something stupid on the road I'll look over & sure enough, they have a phone stuck to their ear or they are doing something with a phone. I'm beyond sick of it.

Yep - I've witnessed the same thing many times. :mad:

I talk to my friends who are riding along with me while driving but I keep my focus and my eyes on the road. If I'm on the Interstate or a construction zone where I feel I have to pay even closer attention, I talk very little - XT will tell you that.

St33lersguy
08-30-2009, 09:21 AM
I already saw the 1st part of it on the O' Reilly Factor. I think it's a great way to prevent people from doing that kind of activity.

Kittyfish
08-30-2009, 09:23 AM
I talk to my friends who are riding along with me while driving but I keep my focus and my eyes on the road. If I'm on the Interstate or a construction zone where I feel I have to pay even closer attention, I talk very little - XT will tell you that.

Heh. When I'm riding with Mr. Kittyfish, he might not know it, but I'm driving every inch of the way with him. Actually, I think he does know - I prefer to "brake" a bit before he does, and it drives him nuts. I keep my eyes on the road the entire time - another set of eyes never hurts.

I can't explain it, but I do think there is a difference between talking to a physical body next to you and talking to a disembodied voice in the ether. I have noticed that people tend to let their attention wander to an extent when they're talking on the phone, period. They pace, they doodle, they twiddle their hair, their eyes wander all over the place. I wonder if they mentally do the same when talking on a phone in the car, out of habit. We do talk on phones long before we learn to drive and the habits are ingrained early. Does that make any sense at all?' Then again, on the other hand, we have people concentrating on the disembodied voice so hard that they lose connection with operating the vehicle. So maybe I'm talking out of my arse. Wouldn't be the first time.

The Mythbusters did a show on this once. I remember that they found that they drove as badly talking on a cell phone as they did when driving drunk (IIRC, it might even have been a tad worse). I don't recall if they tested for a regular conversation with someone in the car - perhaps someone else can remember.

Hammer67
08-31-2009, 01:27 PM
Cell phones, ipods, GPS systems, cd players, Big Macs....one is as bad as the other.

Cell phones are the worst as they are the most frequently used.

HometownGal
09-01-2009, 05:52 AM
Cell phones are the worst as they are the most frequently used.

Women putting on eyeliner and mascara while driving are almost as dangerous. :horror: When I see this shit, it infuriates me. :mad:

Great points, Kittyfish! :drink:

Preacher
09-01-2009, 06:09 AM
Women putting on eyeliner and mascara while driving are almost as dangerous. :horror: When I see this shit, it infuriates me. :mad:

Great points, Kittyfish! :drink:

I remember a buddy of mine telling me that oneday, he say a woman driving who had a cup of coffee in one hand, eyeliner in the other, looking in the mirror and applying it... AND TALKING ON THE PHONE... back when there WERE NO EARPHONES! That's right, she was holding it with her shoulder!

How was she steering you ask? Well, that is what God gave us knees for!
:doh:

SteelMember
09-01-2009, 09:14 AM
Well, that is what God gave us knees for!
:doh:

And here I thought you were going to say "to pray". :wink02::chuckle:

Hines0wnz
09-21-2009, 01:34 AM
I was most guilty of texting & driving. I have a bluetooth headset for talking but I dont always use it. :-x