PDA

View Full Version : Ertards


theplatypus
09-11-2009, 10:16 PM
Documenting the retards that visit the ER. Some of these are pretty profanityfilterprofanityfilterprofanityfilterprofa nityfiltering funny.

http://www.ertards.com/?page=1

7SteelGal43
09-12-2009, 12:55 AM
Can you imagine what it will be like if we give all these e-tards free government coverage ?

tony hipchest
09-12-2009, 01:15 AM
Can you imagine what it will be like if we give all these e-tards free government coverage ?the might actually call their primary care physician's secretary as opposed to clogging up the ER :noidea: (which is designed to treat life or death emergencies, but is currently being abused as a free "walk in" clinic).

Shellshock
09-12-2009, 01:51 AM
I was in the ER with a broken leg and then some mexican came with a tooth ache. The ER doctor was like WTF.

fansince'76
09-12-2009, 01:55 AM
Can you imagine what it will be like if we give all these e-tards free government coverage ?

Won't be free for those of us who pay taxes.

tony hipchest
09-12-2009, 02:04 AM
I was in the ER with a broken leg and then some mexican came with a tooth ache. The ER doctor was like WTF.great example. ive actually driven 90 miles to mexico to pay 25 bucks to simply have a tooth removed. you show up, thell them you want it removed and BAM! it is gone.

an ER admission would probably cost 1000 bucks easy. go to a dentist and they want to x-ray it, clean it, and floss it before it is pulled (for $500), even if they told you it needed to be yanked a year ago. its pretty much a racket.

Preacher
09-12-2009, 02:04 AM
the might actually call their primary care physician's secretary as opposed to clogging up the ER :noidea: (which is designed to treat life or death emergencies, but is currently being abused as a free "walk in" clinic).

Nope. Hey Tony, I know you work with military. You ever see their ER room? Cant get an appointment with you PCD? Nope. Go to the ER. The ER became EXACTLY what you are talking about... a Free Walk in Clinic.

That is why you pay 25 for an office visit, but 100 for a ER visit, or 50 for a office visit and 150 for a ER visit. (or more, depending on your plan).

It is specifically to stop using the ER as a free walkin clinic

tony hipchest
09-12-2009, 02:28 AM
Nope. Hey Tony, I know you work with military. You ever see their ER room? Cant get an appointment with you PCD? Nope. Go to the ER. The ER became EXACTLY what you are talking about... a Free Walk in Clinic.

That is why you pay 25 for an office visit, but 100 for a ER visit, or 50 for a office visit and 150 for a ER visit. (or more, depending on your plan).

It is specifically to stop using the ER as a free walkin cliniclast time i was in an ER was about 25 years ago for an emergency appendectomy on base. now the base hospital i was born in is nothing but a clinic, and everything is contracted out to our local hospital.

so what youre saying is the ER gets to charge $100 vs. $25 for an office visit? sounds like capitalism at its finest. :rolleyes: no wonder nothing is being done to fix this "problem". :dollar:

as long as private enterprise hospitals can turn a profit (either via govt payment or insurance), the congestion in the ER makes no difference to the bottom line.

they would gladly clip my toenails for $100 bucks if i needed an emergency clipping.

i think i am going to go to the er and say my head hurts because my hair is too long, just to see what happens. after an MRI and a head shave, i dont think the hospital/insurance co.s will lose too much sleep over the profit they turned.

of course the govt and premium payers who dont abuse the system feel it.

Preacher
09-12-2009, 02:50 AM
last time i was in an ER was about 25 years ago for an emergency appendectomy on base. now the base hospital i was born in is nothing but a clinic, and everything is contracted out to our local hospital.

so what youre saying is the ER gets to charge $100 vs. $25 for an office visit? sounds like capitalism at its finest. :rolleyes: no wonder nothing is being done to fix this "problem". :dollar:

as long as private enterprise hospitals can turn a profit (either via govt payment or insurance), the congestion in the ER makes no difference to the bottom line.

they would gladly clip my toenails for $100 bucks if i needed an emergency clipping.

i think i am going to go to the er and say my head hurts because my hair is too long, just to see what happens. after an MRI and a head shave, i dont think the hospital/insurance co.s will lose too much sleep over the profit they turned.

of course the govt and premium payers who dont abuse the system feel it.

Actually Tony, that is not at all how the system works. If you show up at the ER. The tests are the same, but the ER costs the hospital quite a bit more. It means more nurses, more doctors on staff, more equipment (redundant) to buy, etc. They would PREFER you go to your Pri.Care Doc. to get the work done. However, people abuse the system. The way to fix that abuse, is to charge them a penalty to abuse the system. Don't want to wait to go see a doc? Fine. Here is a doctor right here. Now sit here for 5 hours and pay 5 times more. It still costs the hospital. Of course, that is in a Closed HMO.

In an Open HMO, Its worse, because the hospital will bill. A 4000 dollar procedure will be paid out at 800 dollars. That procedure needed equipment, doctors, nurses, etc. that had to be on staff for the idiot that could have gone to his primary care doctor, and then made an appointment with a specialist to have the same thing done... IN OFFICE possibly.

In a PPO (which goes by a varied of names now), it is the same. For the hospital, there is vary little difference between a PPO and a open HMO.

I can't tell you how many times I saw this abused on base (which is a classic closed HMO). In the end, Single Payer Insurance is an open HMO, which has the exact same problem-- The Primary Care Doc is the gatekeeper. Do you want to see a specialist? Have to get permission from the PCD. Want to have a lab done? It takes permission from a PCD. Thus, being the funnel, his days are tied up, appointments are booked up for weeks. So you want to see him because you are sick now? Too bad, unless you get to be the one that gets in on his 2 open tiem slots he keeps for each day... that 50 are calling for. So what do the rest do? SOme stay home. Some call tomorrow... Some say screw it, and head to the ER.

The problem is even greater in rural communities, as Canada is starting to find out... http://www.rrh.org.au/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=240 Of particular notice is that nurses found 65 percent of the cases to be non-emerencies. Furthermore, The three things they say will change it are 1. MOre PCD,s 2. More Nurse Practioners (which equate to the same thing) and 3. More walk in clinics. The number are STAGGERING.

Here's a blog from another doc
As a follow-up to what I wrote last week (http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2004/06/more-on-er-waits.html) on the ER stories near Boston comes this report (http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2004/06/21/gvsc0621.htm). Most of it we know already, but it’s nice to see some concrete data: One-fifth of patients coming to the ED did not have conditions requiring emergency care, and another one-fifth had urgent conditions that could have been treated in a primary care setting, the report shows.
Uninsured and Medicaid patients in some communities might have to wait six months or more for an appointment with a specialist. But if they go to an ED, they get all their needs met in one place at any time.
“The convenience of the emergency department really offsets the long waits that are associated with it” . . .
The last point has resonance. The key is primary care and specialist access. When I work in ED fast-track, there is a good proportion who come in for medication refills and the like – simply because they can’t contact nor see their primary care physician.

And a write up about what he is reporting (its the second link he refers too)

Washington -- Hospital emergency departments are being overburdened with uninsured patients partly because these patients are unaware of primary care services available in their communities, says a new report from the Urgent Matters program at George Washington University.

Researchers with Urgent Matters, which is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, found that severely restricted access to specialty care and mental health services and almost nonexistent dental care are driving many more patients to seek attention in emergency departments.

"When we started this project, we expected to see gaps, but not to see them as large and as prevalent as they were," said the program's director, Bruce Siegel, MD, MPH.

One-fifth of patients coming to the ED did not have conditions requiring emergency care, and another one-fifth had urgent conditions that could have been treated in a primary care setting, the report shows.

"In reality, the emergency department serves as the safety net for the safety net," said Marsha Regenstein, PhD, the report's author. "For some patients, it's their only source of care and the only option for timely care."

Uninsured and Medicaid patients in some communities might have to wait six months or more for an appointment with a specialist. But if they go to an ED, they get all their needs met in one place at any time.

Socialized medicine will just drive this issue through the roof.

theplatypus
09-12-2009, 07:00 AM
I should have known that this would get turned into some political circle jerk.

Preacher
09-12-2009, 06:08 PM
I should have known that this would get turned into some political circle jerk.

Yeah, probably. :chuckle:

tony hipchest
09-12-2009, 07:48 PM
I should have known that this would get turned into some political circle jerk.

i think youre being a little hard on 7steelgal43....

well maybe not. par for the course. :jerkit:

i nearly took my daughter to the ER twice. she was 2 when she 1st got bit by a scorpion and i kinda felt hopeless. we're 2 minutes from the hospital. by the time we got her up there she seemed fine, and started to waiver whether to take her in. my MIL is a nurse so we had her call to talk to the nurse there. she said if there was no reaction by now from one of our local scorps, our daughter would be fine = no worse than a bee sting.

the other time was when she was 3 and her fever reached 105. took her to the nighttime clinic instead. actually, they probably saw her quicker there (and cheaper).

unfortunately, most people just dont use sound judgement.

i had an employee call about 5 years ago, to leave her shift and go to the base hospital for a harmful substance in her eye.

turned out to be an eyelash. :doh: