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mesaSteeler
11-24-2009, 06:08 PM
Lacking A Champion's Class
http://pit.scout.com/2/922938.html
By Jim Wexell
SteelCityInsider.com
Posted Nov 24, 2009


The Steelers aren't defending their title with the same class their forefathers displayed in the 1970s. But Mike Tomlin still has time to impose his will.

This offseason past, Mike Tomlin reviewed tapes of the 1975 Steelers because he wanted to get a feel for how opponents would approach games against his defending champions.

Tomlin should’ve instead paid attention to how those defending champions approached their opponents, particularly those with losing records.

In 1975, the Steelers beat the (2-12) San Diego Chargers 37-0, the (3-11) Cleveland Browns 42-6 and 31-17, the (6-8) Denver Broncos 20-9, the (4-10) Chicago Bears 34-3, the (4-10) Green Bay Packers 16-13, the (5-9) Kansas City Chiefs 28-3, and the (3-11) New York Jets 20-7.

The first thing you should notice about that list is its length, and you should wonder where today’s defending champs can procure such an easy schedule.

But one should also notice the complete and utter domination displayed by those defending champs. Against teams that eventually finished with losing records, the Steelers’ average margin of victory that season was 21.3 points.

And don’t think it was a fluke, because from that era’s first playoff season, 1972, until its fourth championship season, 1979, the Steelers lost exactly one game to a team that finished with a losing record.

Even during that 1979 loss to the division-rival Bengals, Coach Chuck Noll blistered his team at halftime and asked them: “Are you guys throwing this game?”

It was a brutal insult, but it revealed the level of incredulity that those champions took to their first bad loss in eight years.

These champs, on the other hand, have endured two such losses in nine games.

Of course, finding a way to win on a bad day is a problem for any team that relies so heavily on its passing game. (Here is yet another reason, as if any more were needed, that our pass crap offense is killing us. - mesa)

Through the first part of this season, the Steelers’ franchise-low 41-59 run-pass play-call ratio had been understandable. After all, a consistent running game requires a young, healthy back who can hit it up between the tackles and move the chains. The Steelers haven’t had that since Jerome Bettis limped off the field on Dec. 2, 2001 as the NFL’s leading rusher. I contend he was never the same back after that groin injury, and that his replacements, Amos Zereoue and Willie Parker, weren’t of the move-the-chains ilk.

The Steelers stuck to the formula for parts of the next six seasons until pretty much giving up on it last season – and they won another Super Bowl.

While winning a championship without a true run game has been proven possible, defending a championship without one is next to impossible, if only for matters of physical consequence. The 2006 Steelers found that out, and these Steelers weren’t even interested in re-learning the lesson.

And then along came Rashard Mendenhall.

In what may have been his finest bit of coaching, Tomlin benched and then cajoled and then motivated his previous year’s 1st-round pick into becoming the physical, between-the-tackles chain-mover he’s desired since being named head coach.

However, the offensive game plans have not kept up with this evolution of talent.

It should now. The Steelers came one first down away from disposing of the Chiefs in overtime Sunday, and they were only two yards from said first down. But instead of hammering Mendenhall, these too-clever defending champs tossed wide to their slowest back behind a pass-catching tight end being used wrongly at fullback. The Steelers lost yardage, lost the game, and lost a share of first place.

It was a shameful experience that’s still being debated. Certainly the talent-depleted secondary can be blamed for this loss, as could defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau for not fixing a flaw in his third-down “mixer” defense that quick-snapping Brett Favre twice exposed a month prior. And certainly Tomlin can be pinned down for setting an awful special-teams tone this year when he cut last year’s leading ST tackler, Anthony Madison, in order to keep an experienced but physically useless 7th corner in Keiwan Ratliff. Yes, that would’ve been Madison out there on the left wing instead of the flat-footed, lunging Ike Taylor for the opening kickoff.

But, truly, this game came down to the one play: the disastrous 3rd-and-2 call. And players such as Hines Ward, who said after the game that “the coaches have to evaluate themselves as much as we do,” know this game – as many games do – came down to one play.

Now, some will point to a montage of potential game-changing moments, such as the opening kickoff, or Heath Miller’s drop, or Ben Roethlisberger’s red-zone interception, or any number of physical mistakes that were made against the Chiefs. But players make physical mistakes all the time. It’s an accepted part of the game. That’s why coaches only seethe over mental mistakes. And that’s why coaches, who are never in position to make physical mistakes, can’t make mental mistakes with the game on the line. It’s not their job to win games with a call, but it’s certainly their job not to blow one with a brain cramp.

Certainly Tomlin will recognize that this one play represents a philosophical flaw in his team’s thinking, and that there’s still time to use this error as a learning experience.

In fact, it’s the perfect time for Tomlin to recapture the “Offense by Attrition” mantra he brought with him to Pittsburgh. He now has the running back to do so, and he only needs to change the culture back to what he knows deep in his heart works best.

At the very least, it’ll help the Steelers win the games they should win. At the very best, it’ll help these Steelers defend their title with the class of their forefathers.

(SteelCityInsider.com publisher Jim Wexell has authored three books on the Steelers, including his most recent, "Steeler Nation".)

fansince'76
11-24-2009, 06:16 PM
The Steelers aren't defending their title with the same class their forefathers displayed in the 1970s.

:rolleyes:

That was one of the best teams in NFL history (if not THE best). This one isn't, wasn't last year, and if anyone thought differently, they were deluding themselves.

AllD
11-24-2009, 06:39 PM
The 1970s team was the best team of the Super Bowl era and if you extrapolate the rules and complexity of the game, maybe just the best in history of the league.

Now this team is not the team of the 1970s as I had hoped. No way Joe Greene would tolerate the way this defense has played in the 4th quarter. He would have ripped the seats out of Three Rivers if one of those crap teams that beat us, beat them.

No way Coach Noll would settle for mediocrity on STs (with exception to Bobby Walden) knowing they are one third of the game. He rarely out thought or over thought a situation. He found a winning formula and stuck with it, however allowing the passing game to evolve without sacrificing the team's identity.

Even on the off year of 1976 when Brad was hurt, the D stepped up with 9 straight wins at the end of the season including 5 shutouts and there were two 1,000 yard rushers.

Today's team has lost its swagger and pride. I made a mistake when I considered them as comparable in many ways to the glorious team.

There is still an opportunity to turn it around, but we only have one week to do it- and with our best player only questionable to play at best. Something unknown to the public is wrong here as there is no logical reason other than attitude why this team is underachieving.

xfl2001fan
11-24-2009, 06:42 PM
The level of disparity in the NFL is such that even the crappy teams today are significantly better than the crappy teams back then. There is (generally speaking) far less difference in a SB contending team and a bottom dweller than there was back in that day.

HughC
11-24-2009, 06:46 PM
That was before free agency and the salary cap. There's no way you can make a fair comparison of a current team to teams of that era. Keeping a championship team competitive today is a far more difficult task than it was back then.

steelerjim58
11-24-2009, 06:49 PM
The level of disparity in the NFL is such that even the crappy teams today are significantly better than the crappy teams back then. There is (generally speaking) far less difference in a SB contending team and a bottom dweller than there was back in that day.

While I know it's all a matter of opinion, I would say you are nuts if you think the league is stronger top to bottom now than it was then.

steeltheone
11-24-2009, 07:05 PM
While I know it's all a matter of opinion, I would say you are nuts if you think the league is stronger top to bottom now than it was then.

I agree. While i'm not that old . I don't remember so many crappy teams as we have now.

HometownGal
11-24-2009, 07:23 PM
I agree. While i'm not that old . I don't remember so many crappy teams as we have now.

I think you missed part of the article above:

In 1975, the Steelers beat the (2-12) San Diego Chargers 37-0, the (3-11) Cleveland Browns 42-6 and 31-17, the (6-8) Denver Broncos 20-9, the (4-10) Chicago Bears 34-3, the (4-10) Green Bay Packers 16-13, the (5-9) Kansas City Chiefs 28-3, and the (3-11) New York Jets 20-7.

BlastFurnace
11-24-2009, 08:09 PM
That team always took care of business. All things being equal...put last weekends game 30 years ago...and the defending champs beat them by 30.

mesaSteeler
11-24-2009, 08:28 PM
That team always took care of business. All things being equal...put last weekends game 30 years ago...and the defending champs beat them by 30.

Not only would the 70 Steelers have beaten them but I doubt KC would have ever gotten over the 50 yard line.

BlastFurnace
11-24-2009, 09:59 PM
The 1970s team was the best team of the Super Bowl era and if you extrapolate the rules and complexity of the game, maybe just the best in history of the league.

Now this team is not the team of the 1970s as I had hoped. No way Joe Greene would tolerate the way this defense has played in the 4th quarter. He would have ripped the seats out of Three Rivers if one of those crap teams that beat us, beat them.

No way Coach Noll would settle for mediocrity on STs (with exception to Bobby Walden) knowing they are one third of the game. He rarely out thought or over thought a situation. He found a winning formula and stuck with it, however allowing the passing game to evolve without sacrificing the team's identity.

Even on the off year of 1976 when Brad was hurt, the D stepped up with 9 straight wins at the end of the season including 5 shutouts and there were two 1,000 yard rushers.

Today's team has lost its swagger and pride. I made a mistake when I considered them as comparable in many ways to the glorious team.

There is still an opportunity to turn it around, but we only have one week to do it- and with our best player only questionable to play at best. Something unknown to the public is wrong here as there is no logical reason other than attitude why this team is underachieving.

Nice post! I thought this defense was better than it was myself. It's quite evident that there are only two playmakers on the entire defense who will step up and make a play when we desparately need one....Harrison and Troy.

eafratitpm3
11-24-2009, 11:58 PM
As said earlier this team lacks pride and heart. They need to bring it for 60 minutes and have some pride about themselves, Steeler Nation, and the Steeler Champions of past. PERIOD!!!!!!!!!

Texasteel
11-25-2009, 05:36 AM
Not only would the 70 Steelers have beaten them but I doubt KC would have ever gotten over the 50 yard line.

Sorry guys, but that team was on a plain of its own. Todays team could not play with them. In fact I think the 70s team, given the same rules, would beat any of todays teams into submission by the 4th qu.

revefsreleets
11-25-2009, 09:08 AM
I didn't realize that losing games a team should win actually made the team low-class.

I also don't buy this new anti-pass sentiment. First off, it's not like we ran the ball 5 times and passed it 45. It was like 45-30...and that is NOT why we lost. We lost because of penalties, a tipped pass that resulted in an INT, another pass where the QB was hit as he released that resulted in a LONG INT (and those two plays wound up resulting in a 13 point swing), poor ST play (another 7 point swing), and the defense giving up uncharacteristic multiple long plays.

With proper execution and crisper defense, we probably would have won about 40-10, and everyone would be patting each other on the back about how great the Steelers looked, particularly the offense.

Also, had we been on more solid footing in the 4th, we probably WOULD have run the ball more, which would have balanced the attack out...but then people would be complaining about how we were playing to not lose, and how we should have passed more to keep pouring the points on...

Ricco Suavez
11-26-2009, 06:33 AM
I didn't realize that losing games a team should win actually made the team low-class.

I also don't buy this new anti-pass sentiment. First off, it's not like we ran the ball 5 times and passed it 45. It was like 45-30...and that is NOT why we lost. We lost because of penalties, a tipped pass that resulted in an INT, another pass where the QB was hit as he released that resulted in a LONG INT (and those two plays wound up resulting in a 13 point swing), poor ST play (another 7 point swing), and the defense giving up uncharacteristic multiple long plays.

With proper execution and crisper defense, we probably would have won about 40-10, and everyone would be patting each other on the back about how great the Steelers looked, particularly the offense.

Also, had we been on more solid footing in the 4th, we probably WOULD have run the ball more, which would have balanced the attack out...but then people would be complaining about how we were playing to not lose, and how we should have passed more to keep pouring the points on...

A great post. Someone with common sense. Wow a refreshing change.

OneForTheToe
11-26-2009, 10:43 AM
I just don't think you can compare the eras like this. I was going to say apples and oranges, but that is probably too different. Still, it is hard to compare great teams back then to now. The Steelers' teams of the 70s, as well as the other great teams of that era, had 10 players or more each who could start for the majority of teams in the league. That has has a major impact on special teams because the great teams had superior talent on those units. Now a days everybody is rolling over their special teams players every few years.

SteelGhost
11-26-2009, 11:22 AM
A great post. Someone with common sense. Wow a refreshing change.

+1 :thumbsup:

70's Dynasty was out of this world, plain and simple. I'm very happy to have "lived" those amazing games when my beloved team played 60 minutes of great football...ahh the memories.

I hope this 2009 team puts some more passion and dedication for the rest of the season 60 minutes each game in the 3 phases.

Go Steelers :tt: