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View Full Version : Speaking of 65 years - - - Iwo Jima


Fire Haley
02-19-2010, 07:40 PM
(February 19 March 26, 1945)

Semper Fi

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9f/37mm_Gun_fires_against_cave_positions_at_Iwo_Jima. jpg

GBMelBlount
02-19-2010, 07:47 PM
My father was involved in the planning & execution of D day.

If he said it once, he said it a thousand times:

"Tom, War is hell".

RIP dad.

http://www.iwojima.com/battle/battlec.htm

(Link for more details / pictures)



The Battle - The Land Battle

D-Day February 19, 1945

Shortly before 2am on Feb. 19, 1945, the Navy's big guns opened up on Iwo Jima again, signaling the beginning of D-Day. After an hour of punishment, the fire was lifted, leaving Iwo smoking as if the entire island were on fire.

Both Americans aboard their transports and the Japanese in their caves looked to the skies now. One-hundred-ten bombers screamed out of the sky to drop more bombs. After the planes left, the big guns of the Navy opened up again.

At 8:30am, the order, "Land the Landing Force," sent the first wave of Marines towards the deadly shores. Once ashore, the Marines were bedeviled by the loose volcanic ash. Unable to dig foxholes, they were sitting ducks for the hidden Japanese gunners.

Heavy fire made it impossible to land men in an orderly manner. Confusion reigned on the beaches.

The battle was unique in its setting. One hundred thousand men fighting on a tiny island one-third the size of Manhattan. For 36 days Iwo Jima was one of the most populated 7.5 miles on earth.

Mt. Suribachi, the 550-foot volcanic cone at the islands southern tip, dominates both possible landing beaches. From here, Japanese gunners zeroed in on every inch of the landing beach. Blockhouses and pillboxes flanked the landing areas. Within, more heavy weapons stood ready to blast the attacking Marines. Machine guns criss-crossed the beaches with deadly interlocking fire. Rockets, anti-boat and anti-tank guns were also trained on the beaches.

Every Marine, everywhere on the island was always in range of Japanese guns.

The Japanese were ready.

The invading US Marines fought above ground. The defending Japanese fought from below ground. The US Marines on Iwo rarely saw a Japanese soldier.

Historians described U.S. forces' attack against the Japanese defense as "throwing human flesh against reinforced concrete."

Vincent
02-19-2010, 08:07 PM
:salute:

That is all.

Fire Haley
02-19-2010, 08:47 PM
(Link for more details / pictures)

Thanks


http://www.iwojima.com/battle/battlec.htm

http://www.iwojima.com/battle/lbattla.gif

supa_fly_steeler
02-19-2010, 08:55 PM
r.i.p fallen comrades

GBMelBlount
02-19-2010, 10:24 PM
I'm watching band of brothers. Episode 3.

Episode 1 was last night.

Episodes 2 & 3 tonight.

If you've seen it you understand...

NEPAsteeler
02-19-2010, 10:30 PM
:usa:
:salute:

RIP to all those who have lost their lives fighting for our freedom.

OneForTheToe
02-19-2010, 11:05 PM
I'm watching band of brothers. Episode 3.

Episode 1 was last night.

Episodes 2 & 3 tonight.

If you've seen it you understand...

A fantastic miniseries. Credit to Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg for making it. But mostly, credit to those who lived it and especially those who didn't.

urgle burgle
02-21-2010, 04:20 PM
My father was involved in the planning & execution of D day.

If he said it once, he said it a thousand times:

"Tom, War is hell".

RIP dad.

Mel,

If you could, you should somehow relate his stories, and whatever details could be given about just this. His involvement, hows things transpired, etc. I would be highly interested in such a posting/story. To him, and all the others that served and died in that war.....peace, honor, and thanks.

urgle burgle
02-21-2010, 04:25 PM
tis a shame, in many ways, that the European conflict has overshadowed the conflict in the Pacific. i suppose this is because of the horrors of the Nazis, Hitler being a larger than life picture of evil, and the Holocaust.
but in many ways the Pacific conflict was just as, if not more, violent, tragic, and hard fought.
It would be nice if there was a version of "Band" for the Pacific.

OneForTheToe
02-21-2010, 04:35 PM
tis a shame, in many ways, that the European conflict has overshadowed the conflict in the Pacific. i suppose this is because of the horrors of the Nazis, Hitler being a larger than life picture of evil, and the Holocaust.
but in many ways the Pacific conflict was just as, if not more, violent, tragic, and hard fought.
It would be nice if there was a version of "Band" for the Pacific.


Not sure if it is still a go, but:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band_of_Brothers_%28TV_miniseries%29

Spielberg is producing a sequel miniseries called The Pacific that will premiere in March 2010.[5]

urgle burgle
02-21-2010, 04:37 PM
Not sure if it is still a go, but:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band_of_Brothers_%28TV_miniseries%29

One...thanks for the update. ill be looking forward to seeing it. about time.

tony hipchest
02-21-2010, 04:46 PM
Mel,

If you could, you should somehow relate his stories, and whatever details could be given about just this. His involvement, hows things transpired, etc. I would be highly interested in such a posting/story. To him, and all the others that served and died in that war.....peace, honor, and thanks.

an old member here, Mosca, actually wrote back and forth with a veteran of this era, and transcribed those letters, and posted them here. great reading.

i will look for the link, to bump or post, but dont know what luck i will have finding it. i think mel or LLT might remember the thread.

edit: i wasnt in any thread he started. (i believe it was in a veterans thread started by LLT) but i did find this which offesrs some testimonials you are thinking about-

http://www.stevedarlow.co.uk/fightinghigh.htm



first 3 issues are up to be downloaded. I read issue #2, it is really, really good.

GBMelBlount
02-21-2010, 04:47 PM
Mel,

If you could, you should somehow relate his stories, and whatever details could be given about just this. His involvement, hows things transpired, etc. I would be highly interested in such a posting/story. To him, and all the others that served and died in that war.....peace, honor, and thanks.

It was difficult for my father to talk about the war Urgle. He would choke up so quickly. He told me stories about the carnage at Dachau, being on guard patrols with guns but no ammo, and of course having dear friends die at his side. I remember asking him once if he had ever had to kill anyone and he started sobbing and couldn't even answer. He passed away last June. I will see if there is anything I can find...

fansince'76
02-21-2010, 04:57 PM
an old member here, Mosca, actually wrote back and forth with a veteran of this era, and transcribed those letters, and posted them here. great reading.

i will look for the link, to bump or post, but dont know what luck i will have finding it. i think mel or LLT might remember the thread.

edit: i wasnt in any thread he started. (i believe it was in a veterans thread started by LLT) but i did find this which offesrs some testimonials you are thinking about-

http://www.steelersfever.com/forums/showthread.php?p=412137#post412137

tony hipchest
02-21-2010, 05:09 PM
i just found it, but fansince beat me to it. thanks. :cheers: it was in an LLT thread. great reading. and thanks to LLT and mosca taking the time to tanscribe those letters for us to learn from.

http://forums.steelersfever.com/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=412078

Re: Listening to a WWII Veteran.

My father was a college classmate of Dick "Yogi" Milana, who was in the L 3-5 Marines and was in the first wave to land on Guadalcanal. He is mentioned prominently in the book On the Canal, which I highly recommend. Here is an excerpt you can read on line. (http://books.google.com/books?id=rB-hOp_AtBYC&pg=PA116&lpg=PA116&dq=%22yogi+milana%22&source=web&ots=YnrbYiCFMZ&sig=msNVVPoeNwm_EIfepMf6IKR6WBA&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=1&ct=result#PPA116,M1) I actually have a memoir that he wrote to my father that is fascinating; I transcribed it, misspellings and all, and I'll post it up later if that's OK with everyone.

Sorry if I get carried away; this history of these men is a passion of mine. I've met with many of them, and written a lot of it down and saved it. As long as no one minds, I'll search my archives of what I've transcribed to the computer and post it.

urgle burgle
02-21-2010, 09:25 PM
Excellent stuff. Thanks Tony and Fan for digging that stuff up. Great reading.
...and Mel, i thank you for sharing the parts about your father...im sorry about your loss.
..I guess for a more specific and less emotional request, would be just about his planning of D-day. If you have anything on that.....i find it fascinating....everything that was involved, but then, either Divine Providence or luck accounted for success in my opinion.

GBMelBlount
02-21-2010, 09:31 PM
Excellent stuff. Thanks Tony and Fan for digging that stuff up. Great reading.
...and Mel, i thank you for sharing the parts about your father...im sorry about your loss.
..I guess for a more specific and less emotional request, would be just about his planning of D-day. If you have anything on that.....i find it fascinating....everything that was involved, but then, either Divine Providence or luck accounted for success in my opinion.

Sure Urgle. Let me see if I can get some details together.

Shea
02-21-2010, 09:48 PM
It was difficult for my father to talk about the war Urgle. He would choke up so quickly. He told me stories about the carnage at Dachau, being on guard patrols with guns but no ammo, and of course having dear friends die at his side. I remember asking him once if he had ever had to kill anyone and he started sobbing and couldn't even answer. He passed away last June. I will see if there is anything I can find...

That's hard to read. God Bless his soul.

I've got to admit that I only know the bare basics of what happened there and am embarrassed because of it. If these men endured this, then I should atleast start to read up as a way of educating myself and as a way of honoring them by knowing what they went through and accomplished.

I've had Flags of My Father on my bookcase for a long time. It's time to read that book and it looks like I also need to watch Band of Brothers to begin what I need to understand and know what happened and then go from there.

Bless you and your papa, GB. :hug:

Indo
02-22-2010, 10:29 AM
Urgle (and whoever else might be interested)

I highly suggest going to the National WWII Museum in New Orleans (It used to be called the National D-Day Museum---then they added a whole section on the Pacific Theater). It is absolutely amazing...

It was conceived by a guy named Stephen Ambrose who was (he since has died) a Professor at the Univ. Of New Orleans. He collected all kinds of D-Day/WWII stuff and then thought up the museum idea. It's in New Orleans because that's where all of the D-Day landing craft were manufactured by a guy named Andrew Higgins---the street the museum is on was renamed Andrew Higgins Avenue

You can read more about it here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_World_War_II_Museum

http://www.nationalww2museum.org/

I also highly suggest reading Stephen Ambrose's books----he is the original author of "Band of Brothers" among many others

I have read most of these---they are all excellent

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_8?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=steven+ambrose&sprefix=steven+A

I suggest starting with "Citizen Soldiers"

good stuff

urgle burgle
02-22-2010, 10:59 AM
Urgle (and whoever else might be interested)

I highly suggest going to the National WWII Museum in New Orleans (It used to be called the National D-Day Museum---then they added a whole section on the Pacific Theater). It is absolutely amazing...

It was conceived by a guy named Stephen Ambrose who was (he since has died) a Professor at the Univ. Of New Orleans. He collected all kinds of D-Day/WWII stuff and then thought up the museum idea. It's in New Orleans because that's where all of the D-Day landing craft were manufactured by a guy named Andrew Higgins---the street the museum is on was renamed Andrew Higgins Avenue

You can read more about it here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_World_War_II_Museum

http://www.nationalww2museum.org/

I also highly suggest reading Stephen Ambrose's books----he is the original author of "Band of Brothers" among many others

I have read most of these---they are all excellent

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_8?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=steven+ambrose&sprefix=steven+A

I suggest starting with "Citizen Soldiers"

good stuff

all good stuff and good suggestions. ive read quite a few of ambrose's books. very good. and yes, i definately want to go down to the New Orleans museum (and hit mardi gras up)...as you mentioned the designer of the Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat, designed by Andrew Higgins from Louisiana. some say, without the Higgins boat, we couldnt have won the war. i love the new WW2 Memorial in DC, and of course, the Marine Corps (Iwo Jima) Memorial too. right beside that memorial, is a set of bells the Netherlands gave us in appreciation for liberating them from the Germans.

i have a couple good books that cover some good stuff that i highly reccomend:

Normandy, the real story (how ordinary allied soldiers defeated Hitler)

The Korean War by Max Hastings- really good, for the War everybody forgets.

Alpha, Bravo, Delta, Guide to the US Army--- just a easy way to cover the history, wars, etc.

i need to be less biased (lol) and branch into the Marines more. those guys bore the brunt in the Pacific. i dont have any Marines in my family, just an Uncle in the Navy (in the Pacific), two uncles in the Army (both in Europe), one who fought in the Battle of the Bulge.

Mel, i greatly appreciate your efforts, and salute, again, your father, who helped bring, and keep, freedom, for us all.

thanks,

Urgle Burgle (Chris)

Indo
02-22-2010, 11:25 AM
all good stuff and good suggestions. ive read quite a few of ambrose's books. very good. and yes, i definately want to go down to the New Orleans museum (and hit mardi gras up)...as you mentioned the designer of the Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat, designed by Andrew Higgins from Louisiana. some say, without the Higgins boat, we couldnt have won the war. i love the new WW2 Memorial in DC, and of course, the Marine Corps (Iwo Jima) Memorial too. right beside that memorial, is a set of bells the Netherlands gave us in appreciation for liberating them from the Germans.

i have a couple good books that cover some good stuff that i highly reccomend:

Normandy, the real story (how ordinary allied soldiers defeated Hitler)

The Korean War by Max Hastings- really good, for the War everybody forgets.

Alpha, Bravo, Delta, Guide to the US Army--- just a easy way to cover the history, wars, etc.

i need to be less biased (lol) and branch into the Marines more. those guys bore the brunt in the Pacific. i dont have any Marines in my family, just an Uncle in the Navy (in the Pacific), two uncles in the Army (both in Europe), one who fought in the Battle of the Bulge.

Mel, i greatly appreciate your efforts, and salute, again, your father, who helped bring, and keep, freedom, for us all.

thanks,

Urgle Burgle (Chris)

Don't plan to see Mardi Gras and the WWII Museum in the same trip----the museum will be closed during Mardi Gras, like everything else! The roads are blocked for the parades and you won't be able to get to the museum....(I don't think). You may want to call the museum (phone number is on the link) and check with them...but my suggestion would be to leave it for another trip...

urgle burgle
02-22-2010, 11:29 AM
gotcha....thanks for the tip....seems you are quite on your game.....very appreciated.

GBMelBlount
02-28-2010, 08:29 PM
Here is a picture of my dad during WWII.

http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af255/Tommy_d63/DadWar.jpg


Here is a picture of my parents on their wedding day.

They were married in San Antonio TX.

http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af255/Tommy_d63/MomDadWedding.jpg

lamberts-lost-tooth
03-01-2010, 02:31 PM
Very nice thread....Since the last time I posted in the original thread, I found out that my neighbor who lives just two doors down and across the street from me...was am infantryman in WWII and had written a book about his experience. He has been kind enough to give me two signed copies...one for me and the other for hindes204 . (Sorry buddy...I know its LONG overdue...promise to get it sent your way!)

fansince'76
03-01-2010, 02:51 PM
BTW, did anybody else catch the 10-part special on History Channel last week called WWII in HD? It was excellent. :applaudit: I'm probably going to order the DVD set. (http://www.amazon.com/WWII-HD-Gary-Sinise/dp/B002RUNMMO)

Indo
03-01-2010, 03:19 PM
BTW, did anybody else catch the 10-part special on History Channel last week called WWII in HD? It was excellent. :applaudit: I'm probably going to order the DVD set. (http://www.amazon.com/WWII-HD-Gary-Sinise/dp/B002RUNMMO)

Damn!

I meant to DVR that and I totally forgot with the Olympics and everything----I'll have to watch to see if it comes on again

NJarhead
03-01-2010, 03:57 PM
tis a shame, in many ways, that the European conflict has overshadowed the conflict in the Pacific. i suppose this is because of the horrors of the Nazis, Hitler being a larger than life picture of evil, and the Holocaust.
but in many ways the Pacific conflict was just as, if not more, violent, tragic, and hard fought.
It would be nice if there was a version of "Band" for the Pacific.


HBO's "The Pacific" debuts this month I think.

http://www.hbo.com/the-pacific/index.html

GBMelBlount
03-01-2010, 04:04 PM
BTW, did anybody else catch the 10-part special on History Channel last week called WWII in HD? It was excellent. :applaudit: I'm probably going to order the DVD set. (http://www.amazon.com/WWII-HD-Gary-Sinise/dp/B002RUNMMO)

Yes, I DVR'd it and have watched several episodes. Very good. :thumbsup:

urgle burgle
03-02-2010, 02:00 AM
mel,

thanks for including that. now i can put a story to a face.
seems happy...good pic. thanks very much for sharing.
and warden thanks for putting that out there. ill keep an eye out for it. too bad i dont get hbo. but, if you can, preview it and let us know if its any good.

Vincent
03-02-2010, 02:17 PM
I don't collect art per se, but I have a few nice prints of WWII P-51s, just because I love that plane and era. Another favorite is the B-17. When I was a kid we lived next door to a B-17 pilot that flew 35 missions over Germany. He didn't talk about it but you could see it in his eyes.

Anyway, there is a print I've been looking at getting that depicts a particularly moving Christmas time 1943 story.

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/airplanepictures_2094_20546778

Charlie Brown was a B-17 Flying Fortress pilot with the 379th Bomber Group at Kimbolton, England. His B-17 was called ‘Ye Old Pub’ and was in a terrible state, having been hit by flak and fighters. The compass was damaged and they were flying deeper over enemy territory instead of heading home to Kimbolton.

After flying the B-17 over an enemy airfield, a German pilot named Franz Stigler was ordered to take off and shoot down the B-17. When he got near the B-17, he could not believe his eyes. In his words, he ‘had never seen a plane in such a bad state’. The tail and rear section was severely damaged, and the tail gunner wounded. The top gunner was all over the top of the fuselage. The nose was smashed and there were holes everywhere.

Despite having ammunition, Franz flew to the side of the B-17 and looked at Charlie Brown, the pilot. Brown was scared and struggling to control his damaged and blood-stained plane.

Aware that they had no idea where they were going, Franz waved at Charlie to turn 180 degrees. Franz escorted and guided the stricken plane to, and slightly over, the North Sea towards England. He then saluted Charlie Brown and turned away, back to Europe. When Franz landed he told the CO that the plane had been shot down over the sea, and never told the truth to anybody. Charlie Brown and the remains of his crew told all at their briefing, but were ordered never to talk about it.

More than 40 years later, Charlie Brown wanted to find the Luftwaffe pilot who saved the crew. After years of research, Franz was found. He had never talked about the incident, not even at post-war reunions.

They met in the USA at a 379th Bomber Group reunion, together with 25 people who are alive now – all because Franz never fired his guns that day.

When asked why he didn’t shoot them down Stigler later said, “I didn’t have the heart to finish those brave men. I flew beside them for a long time. They were trying desperately to get home and I was going to let them do that. I could not have shot at them. It would have been the same as shooting at a man in a parachute”.

Snopes validated the story. Both Brown's and Stigler's signatures are on the prints.

The point of this post is that while that war, and all wars, are unthinkable violence and indeed a form of hell, there are sometimes acts of chivalry that defy the rest.

Indo
03-03-2010, 09:28 AM
That's an amazing story---I had never heard it...

Good to know that Chivalry is still Alive

SCSTILLER
03-03-2010, 09:38 AM
Great post Vince. I have heard the story but have never seen the painting. You are right though, in war there are always acts of kindness. I remember the story of the Christmast day truce in World War 1. Sometimes humanity just takes over.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/features/christmastruce.htm

Vincent
03-03-2010, 12:46 PM
I remember the story of the Christmas day truce in World War 1. Sometimes humanity just takes over.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/features/christmastruce.htm

That is one of my favorite stories of any kind and I always remember it at Christmas. It really contrasts the humanity of the men sent to fight with the idiocy of the war. I think that exists in any "conventional" war - politicians can't work out their bull@#$% and soldiers are sent to sort it out. I say "conventional" war because this mess we're in is a whole nuther animal.

The reunion of Charlie Brown and Franz Stigler developed into a deep friendship. The two toured and spoke together, shared vacations and so forth.

http://www.valorstudios.com/Images/Franz-Stigler-Charlie-Brown/Franz-and-Charlie-fishing.jpg http://www.valorstudios.com/Images/Franz-Stigler-Charlie-Brown/Franz-Stigler-with-Bf-109.jpg http://www.valorstudios.com/Images/Franz-Stigler-Charlie-Brown/Charlie-Brown-Rotary.jpg http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/airplanepictures_2093_2812360 http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/airplanepictures_2093_2874787

In Franz' obit it mentions he was survived by his special brother Charlie Brown. http://www.legacy.com/can-vancouver/Obituaries.asp?Page=Lifestory&PersonId=106541121 More on the story in Charlie's obit http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/herald/obituary.aspx?page=lifestory&pid=121043278

Christmas brings out the best in some people.

Apologies. No intention to high jack the thread.

lamberts-lost-tooth
03-03-2010, 01:43 PM
Great Story.

In the middle of the chaos of war, sometimes the human spirit has a chance to rise above the politics and the bloodshed and remind its bearer that they are more than soldiers...they are also human beings. We still can get the job done, yet exhibit the best of who we are.

As an M.P. during the Persian Gulf War, there were times that we were forced to keep prisoners overnight in our frontline POW site. Technically that is a big no-no, but the sheer numbers of pow's overwhelmed our ability to transport and feed them preficiently.

During those times...I would often pull a few of the younger "enemy soldiers" out of their razor wire "cages"...and have them police (clean) our camp. I played tough in front of the pow's as a whole, but after the young prisoners were done, I and my team would take them behind the deuce and a half, and treat them to extra rations and a couple of soda's apiece.

it was a small thing, but we all felt .....better....for that little act of kindness. It became a ritual of sorts with every new group that came through.

I hadnt thought about that for awhile....makes me smile even as I recall it.

Vincent
03-03-2010, 01:48 PM
it was a small thing, but...

:salute:

lamberts-lost-tooth
03-03-2010, 02:28 PM
:salute:

Somehere in Iraq...there is a guy telling his kids, "...and this lazy American would make us pick up his garbage and pay us with horrible food and warm pop".
:chuckle: