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mesaSteeler
03-30-2010, 09:33 PM
What in the world is going on with the Steelers?
http://www.observer-reporter.com/www/sidelines/index.html
F. Dale Lolley, the Observer-Reporter's veteran Steelers beat reporter, provides an inside view for Pittsburgh and the rest of the National Football League.


I've had the question posed to me a number of times: "What's going on with the Steelers? Why are so many guys getting in trouble?"

The answer has many facets.

First and foremost is the fact that players in the NFL today make more money and are better-known than at any other time in league history.

Football in the past couple of decades surpassed baseball as America's favorite sport and in this digital age where sponsors are constantly using stars to sell their wares and ESPN constantly brings these guys into America's living rooms, NFL players are more well-known than ever before.

Not only does that make them celebrities, it makes them targets.

At the same time, the money and fame can inflate egos, making a guy that was perhaps humble at one time, change over the course of a few years. In 17 years of covering the NFL, I've seen it happen again and again.

Money and the salary cap also become a factor. Teams can get rid of coaches or front office people a lot easier than they can players. The players know this and, if they so choose, can take advantage of it.

The other thing about the digital age is that not only does it allow the media to perform its job more easily - making plenty of information readily available - it also allows for forums such as this one to discuss at great length anything that comes up.

I'm not saying that's a bad things. Fans should have places they can go to talk to others of a like mind. But, it does allow for the flames to be fanned on issues.

And because information is so readily available, things cannot be covered up or hidden as easily as they could, say, 10 to 20 years ago.

Think about it this way: Remember Penn State's squeaky-clean image of 20 years ago. Now think about the trouble Penn State players have gotten into in recent years. Think those kind of things - frat fights, public intoxication, etc. – didn't happen before? It's now much more difficult for things to be swept aside.

There have always been guys who get in trouble on every professional team's roster. When you are dealing with that many people - particulary young men, they are going to do some stupid things.

And let's face it, the NFL isn't populated by choir boys. These guys are playing in the NFL because they're stronger, faster, tougher than 99.9 percent of the population. In many cases, they've been pampered throughout their lives because of that.

But they also have to be smart enough to know that they cannot put themselves into situations where they not only jeopardize their own character and/or wealth, but also the image of the league and their respective team.

This current group of Steelers has had its share of run-ins, both minor and major, with the law. And that is out of character for a team that has prided itself on not having players like that.

But it's not a problem that is foreign to all NFL teams or sports teams in general.

What can the team do about it? Short of releasing every player who has an indiscetion, something that's not likely to happen, it can pull in the reigns on these guys and also educate them better on what will and will not be tolerated.

When a player is guaranteed a large sum of money, he begins to feel as if he's bullet proof. And professional athletes feel that way already. If they didn't, they would not be able to do many of the things they do in their respective sports.

Has Mike Tomlin given this team too much freedom in terms of treating them like men and professionals? Perhaps.

But the reality is that there's not a lot he can do short of releasing offenders outright - again, something that's not going to happen in every case.

He's in the business of coaching a football team, not babysitting.

posted by Dale Lolley at 5:29 PM 0 Comments Links to this post

fansince'76
03-30-2010, 09:36 PM
Has Mike Tomlin given this team too much freedom in terms of treating them like men and professionals? Perhaps.

But the reality is that there's not a lot he can do short of releasing offenders outright - again, something that's not going to happen in every case.

He's in the business of coaching a football team, not babysitting.

:applaudit:

steeldawg
03-30-2010, 09:51 PM
What in the world is going on with the Steelers?
http://www.observer-reporter.com/www/sidelines/index.html
F. Dale Lolley, the Observer-Reporter's veteran Steelers beat reporter, provides an inside view for Pittsburgh and the rest of the National Football League.


I've had the question posed to me a number of times: "What's going on with the Steelers? Why are so many guys getting in trouble?"

The answer has many facets.

First and foremost is the fact that players in the NFL today make more money and are better-known than at any other time in league history.

Football in the past couple of decades surpassed baseball as America's favorite sport and in this digital age where sponsors are constantly using stars to sell their wares and ESPN constantly brings these guys into America's living rooms, NFL players are more well-known than ever before.

Not only does that make them celebrities, it makes them targets.

At the same time, the money and fame can inflate egos, making a guy that was perhaps humble at one time, change over the course of a few years. In 17 years of covering the NFL, I've seen it happen again and again.

Money and the salary cap also become a factor. Teams can get rid of coaches or front office people a lot easier than they can players. The players know this and, if they so choose, can take advantage of it.

The other thing about the digital age is that not only does it allow the media to perform its job more easily - making plenty of information readily available - it also allows for forums such as this one to discuss at great length anything that comes up.

I'm not saying that's a bad things. Fans should have places they can go to talk to others of a like mind. But, it does allow for the flames to be fanned on issues.

And because information is so readily available, things cannot be covered up or hidden as easily as they could, say, 10 to 20 years ago.

Think about it this way: Remember Penn State's squeaky-clean image of 20 years ago. Now think about the trouble Penn State players have gotten into in recent years. Think those kind of things - frat fights, public intoxication, etc. – didn't happen before? It's now much more difficult for things to be swept aside.

There have always been guys who get in trouble on every professional team's roster. When you are dealing with that many people - particulary young men, they are going to do some stupid things.

And let's face it, the NFL isn't populated by choir boys. These guys are playing in the NFL because they're stronger, faster, tougher than 99.9 percent of the population. In many cases, they've been pampered throughout their lives because of that.

But they also have to be smart enough to know that they cannot put themselves into situations where they not only jeopardize their own character and/or wealth, but also the image of the league and their respective team.

This current group of Steelers has had its share of run-ins, both minor and major, with the law. And that is out of character for a team that has prided itself on not having players like that.

But it's not a problem that is foreign to all NFL teams or sports teams in general.

What can the team do about it? Short of releasing every player who has an indiscetion, something that's not likely to happen, it can pull in the reigns on these guys and also educate them better on what will and will not be tolerated.

When a player is guaranteed a large sum of money, he begins to feel as if he's bullet proof. And professional athletes feel that way already. If they didn't, they would not be able to do many of the things they do in their respective sports.

Has Mike Tomlin given this team too much freedom in terms of treating them like men and professionals? Perhaps.

But the reality is that there's not a lot he can do short of releasing offenders outright - again, something that's not going to happen in every case.

He's in the business of coaching a football team, not babysitting.

posted by Dale Lolley at 5:29 PM 0 Comments Links to this post

So many guys in trouble??? Ben is the only one right now that i can see.

Prok
03-30-2010, 10:02 PM
OMG we had 2 guys get into "incidents" recently. Time to batten the hatches and put our pristine virgin team on lock-down. Don't they know they are Steelers ??


:chuckle:

steeldawg
03-30-2010, 10:10 PM
What in the world is going on with the Steelers?
http://www.observer-reporter.com/www/sidelines/index.html
F. Dale Lolley, the Observer-Reporter's veteran Steelers beat reporter, provides an inside view for Pittsburgh and the rest of the National Football League.


I've had the question posed to me a number of times: "What's going on with the Steelers? Why are so many guys getting in trouble?"

The answer has many facets.

First and foremost is the fact that players in the NFL today make more money and are better-known than at any other time in league history.

Football in the past couple of decades surpassed baseball as America's favorite sport and in this digital age where sponsors are constantly using stars to sell their wares and ESPN constantly brings these guys into America's living rooms, NFL players are more well-known than ever before.

Not only does that make them celebrities, it makes them targets.

At the same time, the money and fame can inflate egos, making a guy that was perhaps humble at one time, change over the course of a few years. In 17 years of covering the NFL, I've seen it happen again and again.

Money and the salary cap also become a factor. Teams can get rid of coaches or front office people a lot easier than they can players. The players know this and, if they so choose, can take advantage of it.

The other thing about the digital age is that not only does it allow the media to perform its job more easily - making plenty of information readily available - it also allows for forums such as this one to discuss at great length anything that comes up.

I'm not saying that's a bad things. Fans should have places they can go to talk to others of a like mind. But, it does allow for the flames to be fanned on issues.

And because information is so readily available, things cannot be covered up or hidden as easily as they could, say, 10 to 20 years ago.

Think about it this way: Remember Penn State's squeaky-clean image of 20 years ago. Now think about the trouble Penn State players have gotten into in recent years. Think those kind of things - frat fights, public intoxication, etc. – didn't happen before? It's now much more difficult for things to be swept aside.

There have always been guys who get in trouble on every professional team's roster. When you are dealing with that many people - particulary young men, they are going to do some stupid things.

And let's face it, the NFL isn't populated by choir boys. These guys are playing in the NFL because they're stronger, faster, tougher than 99.9 percent of the population. In many cases, they've been pampered throughout their lives because of that.

But they also have to be smart enough to know that they cannot put themselves into situations where they not only jeopardize their own character and/or wealth, but also the image of the league and their respective team.

This current group of Steelers has had its share of run-ins, both minor and major, with the law. And that is out of character for a team that has prided itself on not having players like that.

But it's not a problem that is foreign to all NFL teams or sports teams in general.

What can the team do about it? Short of releasing every player who has an indiscetion, something that's not likely to happen, it can pull in the reigns on these guys and also educate them better on what will and will not be tolerated.

When a player is guaranteed a large sum of money, he begins to feel as if he's bullet proof. And professional athletes feel that way already. If they didn't, they would not be able to do many of the things they do in their respective sports.

Has Mike Tomlin given this team too much freedom in terms of treating them like men and professionals? Perhaps.

But the reality is that there's not a lot he can do short of releasing offenders outright - again, something that's not going to happen in every case.

He's in the business of coaching a football team, not babysitting.

posted by Dale Lolley at 5:29 PM 0 Comments Links to this post

Mike tomlin's name should not even come into question here. Not his job to monitor these guys they are grown ups (even though most now can be covered on their parents heath insurance.) And i dont think mike tomlin has the power to just outright release guys especially 2 superstar players.

HometownGal
03-30-2010, 10:34 PM
:applaudit:

I second that :applaudit: :thumbsup:

He's in the business of coaching a football team, not babysitting.



You and I are in the position of moderating, not babysitting. :chuckle:

Mike Tomlin - welcome to our world. :horror: :wink:

RoethlisBURGHer
03-30-2010, 10:57 PM
I totally agree with that.

A team has 53 players on the roster, 45 active on any given game day, plus practice squad players.

Every player when he comes into the NFL has been through at least three years of college.

Last I checked, it's the head coach's job to coach these players, not hold their hands outside of the team facilities.

At 18 years of age you are legally allowed to leave your parents' house. At 18 years of age, your parents are no longer held equally responsible for your actions. So if a player's parents cannot be held responsible for their actions...........how on Earth is a coach, general manager, or even an owner considered responsible?

Galax Steeler
03-31-2010, 04:34 AM
These are grown men they should not have to be babysitted. They are old enough to take care of there actions.

Matty™
03-31-2010, 06:26 AM
Another lame report by a columnist trying to jump on the 'Steelers players being babys' bandwagon, when really there is just a single player who is any serious trouble that I can see and if anything looks set to be zero players in any form of trouble.

Don't understand how you can write so much about something so trivial, so Tomlin shouldn't be babysitting and he probably won't, give them a slap on the wrists, threaten their paypacket and watch them fall into line.

:helmet:

AndyWitmyer
03-31-2010, 09:55 AM
I actually agree with a lot of what this guy had to say - especially in regards to his observation that this stuff probably happened throughout every era of the NFL, it's just a hell of a lot easier to get caught up on it now thanks to the internet and the 24 hour news media. Plus, the money issue - money sometimes does terrible things to good people. It can turn an ordinarily humble person into a pompous bastard. On the flip side, it can influence other people to take advantage of that person's wealth - we've seen this time and time again, most recently with Santonio Holmes. Holmes has been cleared of all criminal charges but if you notice, the civil suit remains.

As an individual acquires more and more wealth, it seems to me that there is clearly some sort of correlation between that individual's acquisition of wealth and the number of people claiming to have been "wronged" in some way by said individual. In other words, the "victims" who come out of the woodwork at the very scent of money. Granted, sometimes wealthy people will in fact break the law, thinking their money can buy them their innocence - but I think more often than not, it's usually the other way around. If desperate and/or morally deficient enough, an individual looking to get some cash might very well learn all of the ways to get as close to their chosen targets as possible - they might find out where they spend their time when they're not on the field and follow them around until the moment is just right to spring a trap. With a good enough attorney, it's easy to go from being a desperately sleazy and greedy scumbag into playing the part of "the victim".

Obviously, I think the single biggest example of this is the thing that Steeler Nation has been grappling since nearly the end of the season. Or as my Steeler-hating co-worker calls it, the Ben "Rapistbeger" Story. Clearly, Ben's current problems are a direct result of the fame and fortune that's come with being a star athlete. Like so many other rich and famous individuals, he's become a target - unfortunately, Ben's personal decisions and the way in which he's handled his fame and fortune have reaped what appears to be more than just the "usual amount of trouble".

With his current legal dilemma, his fame is actually working heavily against him. What we're seeing is a growing sentiment that he's a pompous douchebag who's more or less way out of control. But I think what's really so interesting about this years allegation of sexual misconduct (god, must this be a yearly a thing?) is that the public and the media seemed to be quite taken with the idea that this time, it's not actually about money (even though I think it CLEARLY WILL BE) - that this might really be different from the usual person just trying to get a piece of another's fortune. The media seems to be looking at the fact that the "victim" in this case actually turned to law enforcement first instead of the usual strategy of seeking a settlement through civil litigation. Already, this runs counter to the Lake Tahoe incident from one year prior where, in that case, the individual claiming to have been assaulted (Andrea McNulty) wasn't actually very good at appearing to be a "victim". Going straight for the money will usually have that affect....

Unfortunately for Ben, this years "victim" had apparently done her homework (or at least her attorneys did). Her legal team probably looked at the Lake Tahoe incident and concluded that if the "victim" this time was going to actually succeed where McNulty had failed, she would need to (for the time being) skip the civil suit and simply file some criminal charges with the police. This IMMEDIATELY had the effect of lending a sense of validity to the claim of her assault. So far, the public seems to be buying it. Removing the context of money was pretty smart - they're making it seem as though this charge wasn't brought about by any attraction to Ben Roethlisberger's wallet, but rather it was made on the basis of his despicable actions and morally questionable behavior. The news media has already shown what appears to be a willingness to buy into this idea of her being some sort of good girl who was at the wrong place at the wrong time - so, being already convinced of her innocence (even as the charges against Ben have yet to stick), do you really think they're going to scrutinize her in any meaningful sort of way? So far, the answer is clearly no (which is probably one of the reasons why Ben hired a Private Investigator).

The sad thing is, I can guarantee that at some point in time between now and December, regardless of whether or not the criminal charges actually stick (they probably won't), the "victim" is going to try get a substantial amount of money out of Ben for all of the "pain and suffering" that was caused by blowing him in a stall. The $12 million blowjob. As much as the "victim's" attorney's would like to have us believe, I honestly believe that the criminal charges were only filed to lay the groundwork for the civil litigation to come. In other words, as I said much earlier in my response, I think what we're seeing here is another example of how much damage money can do. My personal opinion on the matter is that if Ben's guilty of anything, it's not rape - it's lacking common sense. There's eventually a price to be paid for that - in Ben's case it, might be several hundreds of thousands of dollars.

xfl2001fan
03-31-2010, 10:06 AM
My understanding of Ben (and it's only heresay) is that he was an arrogant ass in school. The money didn't change him one bit. However, an arrogant ass in college isn't going to be brought up on criminal charges/civil suits because the people who want to be "victims" (i.e. make easy money) know they aren't getting squat out of college students.

Professional players though...they've got the loot...and so every "perceived slight" is reason to go running to the law.

I'm not saying that Ben/Holmes should be absolved of anything, nor am I preaching that they are to be crucified. They could use better judgement for their relatively brief careers...but they are still relatively young as well. They're entering what should be their prime years.

The difference between Holmes going to a club and getting the VIP treatment and someone like me...nobody is going to try and harrass me in any way...because I don't have the money to make it worth their time.

These are hardly the first Steelers to get in trouble, just two of the bigger profiled players...I think that makes it seem worse than what it is. In a day and age when digital media is rampant (i.e. anyone with a cell phone these days can make news), everything is magnified even more.


This isn't Rooney, this isn't Tomlin, this isn't Goodell (though I'd love to blame the jackass...cuz I don't like him)...this isn't even Ben/Santo...

It's a bad combination of a busted justice system (where you can sue McDonalds because they didn't have "hot" on the lid to the coffee and win) and waaaaaay too much media.

RoethlisBURGHer
03-31-2010, 03:34 PM
My understanding of Ben (and it's only heresay) is that he was an arrogant ass in school. The money didn't change him one bit. However, an arrogant ass in college isn't going to be brought up on criminal charges/civil suits because the people who want to be "victims" (i.e. make easy money) know they aren't getting squat out of college students.

Professional players though...they've got the loot...and so every "perceived slight" is reason to go running to the law.

I'm not saying that Ben/Holmes should be absolved of anything, nor am I preaching that they are to be crucified. They could use better judgement for their relatively brief careers...but they are still relatively young as well. They're entering what should be their prime years.

The difference between Holmes going to a club and getting the VIP treatment and someone like me...nobody is going to try and harrass me in any way...because I don't have the money to make it worth their time.

These are hardly the first Steelers to get in trouble, just two of the bigger profiled players...I think that makes it seem worse than what it is. In a day and age when digital media is rampant (i.e. anyone with a cell phone these days can make news), everything is magnified even more.


This isn't Rooney, this isn't Tomlin, this isn't Goodell (though I'd love to blame the jackass...cuz I don't like him)...this isn't even Ben/Santo...

It's a bad combination of a busted justice system (where you can sue McDonalds because they didn't have "hot" on the lid to the coffee and win) and waaaaaay too much media.

Amen to that! In this day and age there are frivolous lawsuits filed daily, and more than half the time the person filing the suit wins. People sue McDonalds because they are obese. We live in the day if nothing is my fault, it's the fault of someone else.

While Ben needs to take responsibility for his most recent legal trouble, he put himself in prime position for this, especially with the Lake Tahoe case not even being to trial yet. If he's charged in Georgia, it helps McNulty's case against him.

Holmes on the other hand, I don't think he needs to take any responsibility for what turned out to be nothing. Someone else threw the glass for goodness sakes.