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View Full Version : Pittsburgh is a highly-educated U.S. city


Gnutella
04-16-2010, 06:16 AM
Check this out!

You know all that talk about how Pittsburgh is such a hostile place for young professionals? Apparently that's not true at all! (http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-04/uop-pyw041510.php)

Pittsburgh's young workforce among top 5 most educated in US
Pittsburgh takes No. 1 spot for percentage of the 25-to-34 set with graduate and professional degrees

PITTSBURGH—Once defined by heavy-industry and blue-collar masses, Pittsburgh now hosts the fifth most educated young workforce in the United States, a distinction that groups the city with such bastions of erudition as Boston, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C., according to a recent report in the Pittsburgh Economic Quarterly published by the University of Pittsburgh's University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR).

UCSUR regional economist Chris Briem used information collected by the U.S. Census Bureau to compare the educational attainment of workers aged 25 to 34 in Pittsburgh and the country's top 40 metropolitan areas. This age bracket provides a truer sense of a local workforce's collective learnedness and of a region's economic competitiveness, Briem said. People this age typically have completed their education, entered the workforce, and are often highly sought by employers. This younger cohort also tends to have had more formal education than previous generations, particularly in cities with a history of heavy industry that provided career-long jobs without requiring advanced degrees, Briem added.

Read more at the link above. Now time for some nifty charts!

There is a uniformly inverse relationship between age and educational attainment in Pittsburgh (http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-04/uop-pyw041510.php)

Nearly half of all 25- to 34-year-olds in Pittsburgh have a college degree (http://www.pitt.edu/news2010/Figure-2.pdf)

If anything, Pittsburgh is a hostile place for young high-school dropouts! (http://www.pitt.edu/news2010/Figure-3.pdf)

Pittsburgh is #1 with a bullet in the percentage of 25- to 34-year-olds with graduate or professional degrees (http://www.pitt.edu/news2010/Figure-4.pdf)

It looks like the hard work of the last 25 years is finally beginning to pay off!

steelerdude15
04-17-2010, 01:42 AM
I will be there in the next couple of years! :tt02:

Galax Steeler
04-17-2010, 05:26 AM
I will be there in the next couple of years! :tt02:

Hope you enjoy it.

revefsreleets
04-17-2010, 07:35 AM
Sent this to my uber liberal DC lawyer friend who actually lived in the Burgh for a couple years. He said that this is all manipulated data, and that this is skewed by all the schools there and the grad students, reiterating to me that Pittsburgh is a 3rd rate hillbilly town filled with ignorant, backwards rednecks.

Those were HIS words, NOT mine. I have vehemently defended Pittsburgh repeatedly.

SteelersinCA
04-17-2010, 12:26 PM
I always judge a city by their airport. I know it's not scientific or based on any serious data, but I think it works pretty well. Unfortunately, I've heard Pittsburgh's airport is in serious trouble. Could be wrong I haven't really looked into much.

Preacher
04-17-2010, 07:16 PM
Well, it figures.

With all the high-tech jobs there... The insurance (one of my insurance companies is there), the hospitals, and the schools, it should be that high.

It says a lot about a city that pulled itself up from where it was in 1980.

Gnutella
04-21-2010, 11:59 PM
Sent this to my uber liberal DC lawyer friend who actually lived in the Burgh for a couple years. He said that this is all manipulated data, and that this is skewed by all the schools there and the grad students, reiterating to me that Pittsburgh is a 3rd rate hillbilly town filled with ignorant, backwards rednecks.

Those were HIS words, NOT mine. I have vehemently defended Pittsburgh repeatedly.

Have you informed him that Washington DC is a fake economy that's bound to collapse, and that the metropolitan area should be less than half the size it currently is? Washington DC in 2010 is like Pittsburgh in 1980: too reliant upon its primary industry, and the ancillary industries combined won't be enough to pick up the slack for the imminent collapse of said primary, because they're just not developed well enough. Of course, when a city is full of shithead Capitals fans, its economy deserves to collapse. :sofunny:

As for the "backwards" claim, the ultimate irony is that Pittsburgh families began telling their children as far back as the 1980's, "You will go to college, because a high-school diploma won't cut it in the future." That's very forward-thinking. Many Pittsburghers knew at the time that the near future was a lost cause, so it was time to retrench and focus on the more distant future -- primarily 2000 and beyond. As the blogger whose blog I found this information on said, Pittsburgh's efforts in education over the last roughly 25 years are the most noteworthy example of organic workforce development in the United States.

steelerdude15
04-22-2010, 12:18 AM
Of course, when a city is full of shithead Capitals fans, its economy deserves to collapse.
:rofl:

revefsreleets
04-22-2010, 04:57 PM
Don't be a coward come on out and say who you mean. Oh you meant yourself, good one.

That shit may play in the Braintrust playpen when you guys circle-jerk over your mutual hate for me, but, dude, you gotta step-up to the plate on the open board.

That was uber weak.

Have anything to contribute to this discussion that's relevant? What's your position on Pittsburgh relative to brain-drain and intellectual retention? I mean other than the really super insightful observation that you don't like the airport.

I'm absolutely breathless with anticipation at the prospect of you actually deigning to contribute your infinite lawyerly knowledge of all things to my humble little thread.

SteelersinCA
04-22-2010, 06:15 PM
www.unc.edu/~appolds/research/progress/RegionalAnchorsMay.pdf

http://www.usatoday.com/travel/news/2003/09/25-airport-cities.htm

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2009/11/pittsburgh_international_airpo.html

http://www.usatoday.com/travel/columnist/grossman/2007-10-15-dismantling-pittsburgh-hub_N.htm

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/business/s_647157.html

http://www.post-gazette.com/localnews/20031104braindrain1104p2.asp

I hate it when my instincts are right....damn the bad luck. Last time I check Gnutella started the thread but it would be typical of you to deem it your thread. The board is replete with enough bickering by you for people to draw their own conclusions on your contrived conflict. There's always next time Rev.

revefsreleets
04-22-2010, 07:06 PM
So....um....anything about the retention of educated people? Anything about education levels in Pittsburgh? Link 6 addressed it, but the data is 10 years old....and wrong.

Link 1: Irrelevant. YOU don't like the airport.
Link 2: Irrelevant. This article cited Detroit as an example. Do you REALLY want to go there?
Link 3: Irrelevant. US Airlines left Pittsburgh for reasons completely unrelated to the education level of it's citizens.
Link 4: More of the same. But this was nice (and completely in-line with my assertion)
Although the best connection is usually one where you can hop from airplane to airplane with no waiting, if you are going to be stuck at an airport for a while Pittsburgh is a pretty good choice. The airport includes more than 100 shops and restaurants, many of which are clustered in a shopping mall-like atrium at the junction of the quadrangle of concourses. Stores like Brooks Brothers, Brookstone, Godiva Chocolatier, General Nutrition Center, Land's End, PGA Tour Shop and Victoria's Secret are more likely to be found at your neighborhood shopping mall than an airport setting.

Link 5: Duh. They lost a hub. Travel numbers dropped. Irrelevant.
Link 6: Outdated and trumped by new data that directly contradicts this.

And, LOOK! Tony just completely bought into the garbage you quickly pumped out. But he's a 3rd stringer....doesn't count even though his wrong only adds to yours.

Expected more from you, lawyer-boy.

tony hipchest
04-22-2010, 07:16 PM
easy there, Radio.

:toofunny: (on so many different levels)

revefsreleets
04-22-2010, 07:23 PM
Just as a reminder, before the lawyer gets us all off tangent because HE doesn't like the airport, a reminder of what this thread is actually about.

Pittsburgh's young workforce among top 5 most educated in US
Pittsburgh takes No. 1 spot for percentage of the 25-to-34 set with graduate and professional degrees

PITTSBURGH—Once defined by heavy-industry and blue-collar masses, Pittsburgh now hosts the fifth most educated young workforce in the United States, a distinction that groups the city with such bastions of erudition as Boston, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C., according to a recent report in the Pittsburgh Economic Quarterly published by the University of Pittsburgh's University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR).

UCSUR regional economist Chris Briem used information collected by the U.S. Census Bureau to compare the educational attainment of workers aged 25 to 34 in Pittsburgh and the country's top 40 metropolitan areas. This age bracket provides a truer sense of a local workforce's collective learnedness and of a region's economic competitiveness, Briem said. People this age typically have completed their education, entered the workforce, and are often highly sought by employers. This younger cohort also tends to have had more formal education than previous generations, particularly in cities with a history of heavy industry that provided career-long jobs without requiring advanced degrees, Briem added.

revefsreleets
04-22-2010, 07:37 PM
Nothing. Again. Typical, bunker-map.

Once more.


Pittsburgh's young workforce among top 5 most educated in US
Pittsburgh takes No. 1 spot for percentage of the 25-to-34 set with graduate and professional degrees

PITTSBURGH—Once defined by heavy-industry and blue-collar masses, Pittsburgh now hosts the fifth most educated young workforce in the United States, a distinction that groups the city with such bastions of erudition as Boston, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C., according to a recent report in the Pittsburgh Economic Quarterly published by the University of Pittsburgh's University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR).

UCSUR regional economist Chris Briem used information collected by the U.S. Census Bureau to compare the educational attainment of workers aged 25 to 34 in Pittsburgh and the country's top 40 metropolitan areas. This age bracket provides a truer sense of a local workforce's collective learnedness and of a region's economic competitiveness, Briem said. People this age typically have completed their education, entered the workforce, and are often highly sought by employers. This younger cohort also tends to have had more formal education than previous generations, particularly in cities with a history of heavy industry that provided career-long jobs without requiring advanced degrees, Briem added.

SteelersinCA
04-22-2010, 09:17 PM
I always judge a city by their airport. I know it's not scientific or based on any serious data, but I think it works pretty well. Unfortunately, I've heard Pittsburgh's airport is in serious trouble. Could be wrong I haven't really looked into much.

Link 1: Irrelevant. YOU don't like the airport.


Just as a reminder, before the lawyer gets us all off tangent because HE doesn't like the airport, a reminder of what this thread is actually about.


Speaking of going off on tangents, where exactly did I say I didn't like the airport. I've never even been there!!!Perhaps you can give us a lesson on reading comprehension before we continue? :toofunny: As a matter of fact I've backed up my point, Pittsburgh's airport is in trouble, that's all I said, never said anything about education or retention, but carry on with your vitriolic nonsense, you're a waste of space.

revefsreleets
04-23-2010, 09:06 AM
Read your own links then get back to me. You own cited links refute your own assertions. Again, I expect gutter logic like this from a Tony, but you should know better.

LOL at the namecalling. You post irrelevant garbage, I correctly call it irrelevant garbage, and you whine like a baby...

X-Terminator
04-23-2010, 11:39 AM
Actually the airport isn't really in that much trouble - it just lost its hub. You still have plenty of options here and it's not like U.S. Airways just packed up and left town. They pretty much own about a quarter of the terminal space. Not only that, it's also been voted one of the most secure airports in the country.

As for the topic, I'm really not surprised that Pittsburgh is a highly-educated city. The city has reinvented itself from a blue-collar based workforce to a major high-tech center. Google, Disney, Intel and Seagate all have research centers here, and the city along with other major companies have been spending a lot of money trying to keep and attract young people than lose them to other cities. In fact, the region has actually gained population for the first time in decades - the quality of education and technology fields, as well as health care and medical research, are a big reason for that.

revefsreleets
04-23-2010, 02:15 PM
The correlation between airport and city isn't a strong one. Look at Canton, OH. I read recently that Orlando was rated the best large airport in the Country, and CAK was the best regional airport in the Country. Canton the city is a literal trainwreck: Shrinking population, horrible unemployment, under-educated, high crime...

WH
04-23-2010, 02:56 PM
Actually the airport isn't really in that much trouble - it just lost its hub. You still have plenty of options here and it's not like U.S. Airways just packed up and left town. They pretty much own about a quarter of the terminal space. Not only that, it's also been voted one of the most secure airports in the country.



There was a rumor that they were going to move the Security Checkpoints to the other side of the Railway. Thus opening up the mall to more traffic. Again, it was just a rumor.