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SteelKnight
09-22-2010, 04:41 PM
So the Bucs plan to make us wear our black jerseys just like the Titans did last week...probably because of the heat.

I'm not sure it will make much of a difference.

I'm not sure whether on a hot day I feel particularly hotter in black.

It clearly makes a difference with metal and cement/tar. I remember in high school there was a team whose colors were black and gold so they had every other metal bench painted black and yellow. The yellow ones were slightly warm. The black ones would burn you seriously.

It probably makes a slight difference but not one that our brain can fully process. Hot is hot. Just like if you have a white and a black person outside on a hot day, they will probably both just say "This is HOT." LOL

#1LambertFan
09-22-2010, 04:55 PM
So the Ttitans plan to make us wear our black jerseys just like the Titans did last week...probably because of the heat.

I'm not sure it will make much of a difference.

I'm not sure whether on a hot day I feel particularly hotter in black.

It clearly makes a difference with metal and cement/tar. I remember in high school there was a team whose colors were black and gold so they had every other metal bench painted black and yellow. The yellow ones were slightly warm. The black ones would burn you seriously.

It probably makes a slight difference but not one that our brain can fully process. Hot is hot. Just like if you have a white and a black person outside on a hot day, they will probably both just say "This is HOT." LOL

You mean the Bucs? Thats a Florida thing. Visiting teams usually wear their darker uniforms for away games. Yes it is much hotter in black jerseys... Trust me. It is about a 10-15 degree difference in direct sunlight.

SteelCityMom
09-22-2010, 05:59 PM
Yeah, I imagine it will affect them the same way in Tampa that it did in Tenn. Only thing you can hope for at that point is that it rains some (which it might Sunday). They dealt with it pretty well last week though, so I figure it will be much of the same. Just keep guys hydrated and rotate them often.

Steel_Bus_24
09-22-2010, 06:15 PM
Tomlin coached there, so hopefully hes got some insight to minimize the impact as best they can

SteelKnight
09-22-2010, 06:17 PM
You mean the Bucs? Thats a Florida thing. Visiting teams usually wear their darker uniforms for away games. Yes it is much hotter in black jerseys... Trust me. It is about a 10-15 degree difference in direct sunlight.

IDK. As someone with a science background, it would be an interesting experiment. Certainly the actually body wouldn't vary that much in temperature (15 degrees) but the question is how much work would the body have to do to keep temperature regulation? (probably more in black)

Like I said, I've clearly noticed it with metal/cement etc.

Maybe tomorrow if it is hot like it was today, I'll go out in two different shirts (white and black) and see if I notice a difference. I believe there would be a slight difference but not enough for your brain to process. I could be wrong.


If you are right, maybe that's why they chose Batch...he is lighter than Lefty...lol

The best test would be on a less hot day in direct sunlight to see if the black will make the person hot while the white does not. When it is super hot, it will probably feel hot anyway.

Besides, a lot of the heat we feel in the direct sunlight will be from the sun hitting our face/head. Now that one I will believe that if you had a black skimask and a white skimask you would notice a difference...but shirt or pants...eh...we'll see.

stb_steeler
09-22-2010, 06:18 PM
If its as hot there as it is here today, wouldnt want to be in that game....:drooling::evil:

SteelKnight
09-22-2010, 06:20 PM
Tomlin coached there, so hopefully hes got some insight to minimize the impact as best they can

They did a great job rotating players last week on the D-line. Hopefully they will do that again and keep everyone fresh and hydrated. They should be drinking everytime they get to the sideline.

Hey...is there a portable potty there? lol It would suck to have to go into the lockeroom to pee. There must be. I've never heard of anyone having to take a pee break. lol

lionslicer
09-22-2010, 06:26 PM
IDK. As someone with a science background, it would be an interesting experiment. Certainly the actually body wouldn't vary that much in temperature (15 degrees) but the question is how much work would the body have to do to keep temperature regulation? (probably more in black)

Like I said, I've clearly noticed it with metal/cement etc.

Maybe tomorrow if it is hot like it was today, I'll go out in two different shirts (white and black) and see if I notice a difference. I believe there would be a slight difference but not enough for your brain to process. I could be wrong.


If you are right, maybe that's why they chose Batch...he is lighter than Lefty...lol

The best test would be on a less hot day in direct sunlight to see if the black will make the person hot while the white does not. When it is super hot, it will probably feel hot anyway.

Besides, a lot of the heat we feel in the direct sunlight will be from the sun hitting our face/head. Now that one I will believe that if you had a black skimask and a white skimask you would notice a difference...but shirt or pants...eh...we'll see.

Its a proven fact darker colors absorbs light quicker and more efficiant than lighter colors. I've seen people do this experiment atleast 1000 times in my life time and I'm only 19. I've even see Bill Nye the science guy do it.
The more light a color absorbs, the hotter it is. I'm pretty sure it has to do with the color spectrum and how White is all colors, and black is no colors, so it absorbs all colors of light. Lighter colors are also more reflectant than darker colors, which also plays a role in it

SoCalFan
09-22-2010, 06:30 PM
I raced MX and still off road on mountain bikes often and YES,ive been cought off guard at times wearing black on hot days and it is much hotter,I now always wear lighter colors!!!

vasteeler
09-22-2010, 06:32 PM
IDK. As someone with a science background, it would be an interesting experiment. Certainly the actually body wouldn't vary that much in temperature (15 degrees) but the question is how much work would the body have to do to keep temperature regulation? (probably more in black)

Like I said, I've clearly noticed it with metal/cement etc.

Maybe tomorrow if it is hot like it was today, I'll go out in two different shirts (white and black) and see if I notice a difference. I believe there would be a slight difference but not enough for your brain to process. I could be wrong.


If you are right, maybe that's why they chose Batch...he is lighter than Lefty...lol

The best test would be on a less hot day in direct sunlight to see if the black will make the person hot while the white does not. When it is super hot, it will probably feel hot anyway.

Besides, a lot of the heat we feel in the direct sunlight will be from the sun hitting our face/head. Now that one I will believe that if you had a black skimask and a white skimask you would notice a difference...but shirt or pants...eh...we'll see.

:rofl:

Riddle_Of_Steel
09-22-2010, 06:40 PM
Jeebus-- is there actually a question of whether black clothes make you hotter or not? I thought that was like.....3rd grade science. If you want to test, just wear a black jersey outside-- in direct sunlight, you will be sweating in no time, even if you aren't doing anything.

mikegrimey
09-22-2010, 06:47 PM
I thought our away uniforms were white/gold and the home ones were black/gold. How can we be wearing our home jerseys on a road game?

LVSteelersfan
09-22-2010, 06:55 PM
I thought our away uniforms were white/gold and the home ones were black/gold. How can we be wearing our home jerseys on a road game?

The home team gets to pick. It is common practice that in hot weather games the home team will make the visiting team wear their dark uniforms. I love the look of the black ones but couldn't they design one that had more of the gold color in it instead of almost totally black. Other team's dark uniforms are like powder blue. Of course I guess it just wouldn't be the same if they didn't have those traditional black uniforms.

SteelKnight
09-22-2010, 07:16 PM
Its a proven fact darker colors absorbs light quicker and more efficiant than lighter colors. I've seen people do this experiment atleast 1000 times in my life time and I'm only 19. I've even see Bill Nye the science guy do it.
The more light a color absorbs, the hotter it is. I'm pretty sure it has to do with the color spectrum and how White is all colors, and black is no colors, so it absorbs all colors of light. Lighter colors are also more reflectant than darker colors, which also plays a role in it

That's all true about absorption and reflection. Yes...I was a science major. That's not the question. The question is whether a shirt will make a noticable difference.

I raced MX and still off road on mountain bikes often and YES,ive been cought off guard at times wearing black on hot days and it is much hotter,I now always wear lighter colors!!!

I appreciate that feedback. I like dark colors so I wear whatever I want. lol I may test it out tomorrow.

Jeebus-- is there actually a question of whether black clothes make you hotter or not? I thought that was like.....3rd grade science. If you want to test, just wear a black jersey outside-- in direct sunlight, you will be sweating in no time, even if you aren't doing anything.

LOL. Maybe I'll test it out. There are lots of factors including face/head providing a lot of perception in direct sunlight so the question is whether a shirt or some pants will make a big difference.

Make no mistake, I agree about darker colors absorbing more light/heat.

The body will certainly regulate to make the difference of a shirt negligible to internal core temperature but it could be that the work it takes to attempt to cool the body results in the temperature perception difference. And having to do more work causes more discomfort, requires more hydration etc.

SteelKnight
09-22-2010, 07:41 PM
Interestingly enough a PhD was suggesting noticing a difference if the black clothing was directly on skin whereas not much of a noticible difference if multiple layers of clothing are used due to the heat having to be transfered.

To me though...once you add multiple layers of clothing, you have to deal with heat trapping...which helps in the winter but sucks in the summer.

So my thought is...

single layer...white better
multiple layers, not much difference.

tony hipchest
09-22-2010, 08:00 PM
steelknight, you have never lived in the desert, have you?

i buy steelers away jerseys only because i wont wear my black ones during the day in summer. it literally feels like a sunburn to the point you wonder if its going to melt to your skin.

(HA! i just noticed my "location" says NYC, NY)

lionslicer
09-22-2010, 08:10 PM
That's all true about absorption and reflection. Yes...I was a science major. That's not the question. The question is whether a shirt will make a noticable difference.



I appreciate that feedback. I like dark colors so I wear whatever I want. lol I may test it out tomorrow.



LOL. Maybe I'll test it out. There are lots of factors including face/head providing a lot of perception in direct sunlight so the question is whether a shirt or some pants will make a big difference.

Make no mistake, I agree about darker colors absorbing more light/heat.

The body will certainly regulate to make the difference of a shirt negligible to internal core temperature but it could be that the work it takes to attempt to cool the body results in the temperature perception difference. And having to do more work causes more discomfort, requires more hydration etc.

It does, scientists aren't stupid :P Some experiments I saw, after they proved the black absorbed more light, they tested it on people to see if it was noticable. The person in the black sweated a lot more and was noticably a lot more uncomfortable.

I can tell you from experience wearing a black shirt outside in 90 degrees, almost instantly it goes from bearable to feeling like someone is pouring a bottle of extremely hot water on my back constantly. Then when I take my shirt off, my white understhirt makes a noticable difference being in the dirrect sun.

Now the variables that we don't know are the shoulder pads and if they heat up, or if they push the shirt off the players skin enough to help, or if because the shoulder pads make the shirt a tad away from the skin it has a reverse effect and hot air gets stuck in their and it essentually becomes an oven. Another one is their jersey material, is it more heat resistant than the average shirt? or is it worse. What about the helmets? Steelers and falcons are the only teams with a black helmet, how much does it heat up in there? There are a lot of things that would come into play here.

SteelKnight
09-22-2010, 08:36 PM
steelknight, you have never lived in the desert, have you?

i buy steelers away jerseys only because i wont wear my black ones during the day in summer. it literally feels like a sunburn to the point you wonder if its going to melt to your skin.

(HA! i just noticed my "location" says NYC, NY)

Cool. I think I will conceed this one. Maybe I should be embarased with my science background. LOL I like dark clothing so I never make my choices based on the season...lol

It does, scientists aren't stupid :P Some experiments I saw, after they proved the black absorbed more light, they tested it on people to see if it was noticable. The person in the black sweated a lot more and was noticably a lot more uncomfortable.

I can tell you from experience wearing a black shirt outside in 90 degrees, almost instantly it goes from bearable to feeling like someone is pouring a bottle of extremely hot water on my back constantly. Then when I take my shirt off, my white understhirt makes a noticable difference being in the dirrect sun.

Now the variables that we don't know are the shoulder pads and if they heat up, or if they push the shirt off the players skin enough to help, or if because the shoulder pads make the shirt a tad away from the skin it has a reverse effect and hot air gets stuck in their and it essentually becomes an oven. Another one is their jersey material, is it more heat resistant than the average shirt? or is it worse. What about the helmets? Steelers and falcons are the only teams with a black helmet, how much does it heat up in there? There are a lot of things that would come into play here.

I agree. I think I will conceed. It would be intersting to see the same study performed with race.

Fire Arians
09-22-2010, 09:58 PM
it does make a difference