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Hammer67
05-20-2006, 02:56 PM
History of Math

Last week I purchased a burger at Burger King for $3.58.

The counter girl took my $4.00 and I pulled 8 cents from my pocket and gave it to her. She stood there, holding the nickel and 3 pennies. While looking at the screen on her register, I sensed her discomfort and tried to tell her to just give me two quarters, but she hailed the manager for help. While he tried to explain the transaction to her, she stood there and cried.

Why do I tell you this?

Because of the evolution in teaching math since the 1950s:

Teaching Math In 1950

A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price. What is his profit?

Teaching Math In 1960

A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price, or $80 What is his profit?

Teaching Math in 1970

A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80. Did he make a profit?

Teaching Math In 1980

A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80 and his profit is $20. Your assignment: Underline the number 20.

Teaching Math In 1990

A logger cuts down a beautiful forest because he is selfish and inconsiderate and cares nothing for the habitat of animals or the preservation of our woodlands. He does this so he can make a profit of $20. What do you think of this way of making a living? Topic for class participation after answering the question: How did the birds and squirrels feel as the logger cut down their homes? (There are no wrong
answers.)

Teaching Math In 2006

Un ranchero vende una carretera de madera por $100. El cargo de produccion es $80. Cuantas tortillas se puede comprar?


:sofunny:

3 to be 4
05-20-2006, 03:03 PM
thats awesome!!

tony hipchest
05-20-2006, 03:08 PM
History of Math


Teaching Math In 1950

A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price. What is his profit?


:sofunny:


i think i know this one:



ˆ?ˆ??•†??™??•??‹?‘—??œ??Š??‰?›??—œ?”???‹ ??†’???Š???Ÿ??Š??„?œ‹?™??…???”???€???? ???›??ˆ?ˆ??•†??™??•??‹?‘—??œ??Š??‰?›??—œ?”???‹ ??†’???Š???Ÿ??Š??„?œ‹?™??…?????€???ˆ ??•†??™??•??‹?‘—??œ??Š??‰?›??—œ?”???‹ ??†’???Š???Ÿ??Š????›??ˆ?ˆ??•†??™??•? :busted:

clevestinks
05-20-2006, 04:17 PM
Ughhhhhh! No Deal! Howie! No Deal!

Prosdo
05-20-2006, 04:52 PM
Funny stuff. But the sad part is I did have something like that happen where the person did not understand what to do lol


Last week I purchased a burger at Burger King for $3.58.

The counter girl took my $4.00 and I pulled 8 cents from my pocket and gave it to her. She stood there, holding the nickel and 3 pennies. While looking at the screen on her register.

CantStop85
05-20-2006, 05:29 PM
Funny stuff. But the sad part is I did have something like that happen where the person did not understand what to do lol
Ditto here. Education is just like anything else in life these days, the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.

HburgXL06
05-20-2006, 06:31 PM
Un ranchero vende una carretera de madera por $100. El cargo de produccion es $80. Cuantas tortillas se puede comprar?


:sofunny:

Viente tortillas en Estados Unidos. El precio de tortillas en Mexico no estan alta. Aquel una persona puede comprar muchos tortillas sin esta teniendo pagar muchos pesos.

BuFu

Suitanim
05-20-2006, 09:23 PM
The problem is, the schools don't teach real math anymore...they teach some kind of bizarre grouping, and math has become an approximate thing.

I tried to help my niece with her math homework a few times, and I can't. We don't speak the same language. It's deeply disturbing to me that math has been dumbed down...something that NEEDS to be precise, cannot be allowed to become accurate, let alone approximate.

I feel sorry for these kids that are being "educated" nowadays...

MattsMe
05-20-2006, 09:29 PM
The problem is, the schools don't teach real math anymore...they teach some kind of bizarre grouping, and math has become an approximate thing.

I tried to help my niece with her math homework a few times, and I can't. We don't speak the same language. It's deeply disturbing to me that math has been dumbed down...something that NEEDS to be precise, cannot be allowed to become accurate, let alone approximate.

I feel sorry for these kids that are being "educated" nowadays...


I have a 14 yr. old niece, and I've helped her in the past with homework. I was helping her with a math assignment once, and she told me that the answers only counted for 40% of the grade. Just showing the you "tried" to work out the problems, even if you get them wrong, will still get you 50 points. The other 10% is for putting your last name, first name, in the upper right hand corner of the paper, followed by the date, and the hour of the class! I couldn't ****ing believe that.

Suitanim
05-20-2006, 09:34 PM
I have a 14 yr. old niece, and I've helped her in the past with homework. I was helping her with a math assignment once, and she told me that the answers only counted for 40% of the grade. Just showing the you "tried" to work out the problems, even if you get them wrong, will still get you 50 points. The other 10% is for putting your last name, first name, in the upper right hand corner of the paper, followed by the date, and the hour of the class! I couldn't ****ing believe that.

Yup, that's what I'm talking about...it's just an absolute travesty that this PC thing has taken over the education system. We are preparing an entire generation of children to not only fail in the face of pacific rim competition, but also be completely clueless in how to deal with that failure, since "They are all winners" now.

Lyn
05-20-2006, 09:58 PM
<Teaching Math In 1990

A logger cuts down a beautiful forest because he is selfish and inconsiderate and cares nothing for the habitat of animals or the preservation of our woodlands. He does this so he can make a profit of $20. What do you think of this way of making a living? Topic for class participation after answering the question: How did the birds and squirrels feel as the logger cut down their homes? (There are no wrong
answers.)>

The educational system is creating a whole generation of people who have no clue into reality.

It would be a really good idea if before these kids tell their mom and dad how they are going to "save the rain forests" that they would first delouse their own closets. Kids have no clue what their parents go through to give them a good life, they think their parents are boring but the woman across the street is so kewl. If they only knew their parents got boring, paying the kid's bills, doing his/her laundry, etc, etc, etc

Livinginthe past
05-20-2006, 10:44 PM
My question would be why?

Lyn, from what I can remember you are a teacher - why do you think that there appears to be a concerted effort to have the next generation of children know a whole lot less about the world than the one before?

I would be genuinely interested in the opinion of someone who is in the teaching trade.

NM

Lyn
05-21-2006, 12:06 AM
My question would be why?

Lyn, from what I can remember you are a teacher - why do you think that there appears to be a concerted effort to have the next generation of children know a whole lot less about the world than the one before?

I would be genuinely interested in the opinion of someone who is in the teaching trade.

NM

Lyn, from what I can remember you are a teacher

<No, I am NOT a teacher. I WAS a teacher, when discipline was taken out of the schools and the PCness came in, I left>

why do you think that there appears to be a concerted effort to have the next generation of children know a whole lot less about the world than the one before?

<I have no idea>

DIESELMAN
05-21-2006, 02:59 AM
To not be able to grasp the simple concept of what change to give back on a 3.58 bill when I give you 4.08 is beyond me. But you can't blame it solely on the teachers, society as a whole has its claim to fame written all over it. The ever changing world from do it yourself to relying on computers has us headed down a de-evolving path of getting nowhere.

Hammer67
05-22-2006, 07:59 AM
I do have to admit that as a member of the "spell checker generation". (first generation to make the switch over to computer from typewriters in school) I became a poor speller.

I rely on the spell checker way too often.

That being said, if I have the spell checker available....does it really matter if I am a poor speller? Talk amongst yourselves...:coffee: :smile:

Livinginthe past
05-22-2006, 10:20 AM
I do have to admit that as a member of the "spell checker generation". (first generation to make the switch over to computer from typewriters in school) I became a poor speller.

I rely on the spell checker way too often.

That being said, if I have the spell checker available....does it really matter if I am a poor speller? Talk amongst yourselves...:coffee: :smile:

These tools are all very handy - the calculator, the spell checker etc etc and they work well in the short term.

The problem is if you become too reliant upon tools and programs to do your work for you then your brain doesn't get the work out it should do.

The brain is a muscle like any other in your body - if you dont use it - it wastes away.

NM

Hammer67
05-22-2006, 12:44 PM
These tools are all very handy - the calculator, the spell checker etc etc and they work well in the short term.

The problem is if you become too reliant upon tools and programs to do your work for you then your brain doesn't get the work out it should do.

The brain is a muscle like any other in your body - if you dont use it - it wastes away.

NM


Absolutely...Take cell phones for instance. Since I have all of my numbers on speed dial in my cell phone, I don't even know my parent's phone number. And, it took me forever to learn my wifes numeber.

But, I do like to think that I put my brain power to use in other ways. An interesting dilemma that technology provides.

SteelR1
05-23-2006, 08:27 AM
This reminds me of this, http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Teachers/1895exam.html

Can you honestly say you know all of these answers, so yes we are getting dumber!!

Suitanim
05-23-2006, 05:31 PM
Good Idea: Tying teachers wages to the success of those they teach.

Guess who hates the idea?

http://www.sptimes.com/2006/05/21/Tampabay/Testing_undervalues_u.shtml

Hammer67
05-24-2006, 06:06 PM
Good Idea: Tying teachers wages to the success of those they teach.

Guess who hates the idea?

http://www.sptimes.com/2006/05/21/Tampabay/Testing_undervalues_u.shtml


Well...uh, Teachers! Because no one wants to be accountable for their own actions.

The next time a teacher bitches about wages and wants to go out on strike, tell them that if they want to work less then 3/4 of the year then you get the equivalent 3/4 of a yearly salary.

Suitanim
05-25-2006, 12:01 PM
This article is absolutely right on the money:
http://www.industryweek.com/ReadArticle.aspx?ArticleID=11260

Continental Drifter -- The Arrogance Of Ignorance
A new generation of the serenely clueless is ready, willing and able to destroy your company.


By Mark Gottlieb
Jan. 18, 2006 -- Your livelihood and your future are both in peril.


The threat you face derives not from any external factors that may affect your company. Instead, it comes from your own employees.


The deadliest business hazard of our time is the result of a sea change in the American approach to education that occurred early in the 1970s. Across the United States, conventional educational standards were tossed out the window, replaced with feel-good theories like "whole-language learning" that emphasized personal fulfillment over the accumulation of hard knowledge. As a result, we now have two generations of men and women who expect gold stars not for succeeding, but simply for trying.

And, sometimes, merely for showing up.


In Great Britain, even primary school students can name all the monarchs of England. How many American children can name the capital of their own state?


In India, the study of mathematics is practically a religion. In the United States, how many retail clerks can make change without relying on a calculator?


In Germany, vocational education is a rigorous and honorable pursuit, producing highly qualified workers and tradesmen. In the U.S.A., people actually boast about their inability to deal with anything mechanical.


But sheer stupidity is not the greatest danger presented by the current crop of blank slates. It is the arrogance bred of ignorance that constitutes an unparalleled descent into goofiness.


In the long-dead past, incompetents generally recognized their own incapacity and behaved accordingly. Today, every jackass sees himself as a genius, and every fool fancies herself a philosopher.


Once, a young colleague at a major firm accosted me in tones of confusion and desperation.


"Mark! Mark!" she called as I walked past her office door. "When was World War II?"


I thought at first that she was joking, but, alas, she was not. The deadliest global conflict in human history had somehow escaped her notice. Yet if I had asked if she honestly believed she deserved her B.A. and felt qualified to perform her job, she would have been gravely insulted and likely kicked me until I was dead.


Like the pod people of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, the arrogantly ignorant appear at first glance as normal as you or me. But beware.


The most profound risk they represent springs not from their cluelessness, but from their inability to recognize their own limitations. Such blind hubris can lead to monumental errors of judgment, grotesque mistakes, and the refusal to accept -- despite a mountain of evidence -- that the strategy they are pursuing may be leading your organization off a cliff. When people like that are in your employ, it is you, not they, who suffer the consequences.

These days, the arrogance of ignorance is so pervasive that I feel confident in making a small wager: Ten bucks says that the worst offenders will read these words and wonder, "Who is this joker talking about?"


If characters like that work for your company -- brother, you're in for a world of hurt.

Lyn
05-25-2006, 12:33 PM
Much of today's eduicational society is not even close to what most of us feel is reality