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mesaSteeler
12-11-2011, 08:34 AM
Roethlisberger's foot injury raises playoff concerns in tight AFC North
Peter King SI

PITTSBURGH -- The two big questions in the NFL today revolve around the Pittsburgh Steelers in the wake of their odd and compelling 14-3 victory over Cleveland Thursday night at Heinz Field.

1. How bad is the Ben Roethlisberger foot and high-ankle-sprain injury -- the left foot looked crushed and grotesque on replay from the second-quarter sack by Scott Paxson -- and will he miss the Steelers' Monday-nighter next week at San Francisco because of it?

2. Will Steelers linebacker James Harrison get suspended or face or a huge fine because of his helmet-to-helmet hit on Colt McCoy with six minutes left?

On Roethlisberger:

We've seen the Roethlisberger tough-man stuff before, so I don't put anything past him. I was amazed to see him come back in the game for the second half after his left ankle and foot got crumpled by defensive tackle Paxson (his first career sack). "He earned my respect for life after that,'' said Steeler wideout Jerricho Cotchery. Could he be ready, somehow, for the game at Candlestick in 10 days? Let's see what the MRI in Pittsburgh today shows; X-rays last night revealed no break in the ankle or foot. This may be a matter of pain tolerance, but high ankle sprains are handled in different ways by different players.

But if you could have seen Roethlisberger last night around midnight, trying to make his way through the locker room, you'd have some real questions about his readiness anytime soon. I saw Roethlisberger putting so little pressure on the foot while walking to the shower that a 10-second walk took two minutes. When he came back to the locker room, I asked him if he'd seen the replay yet. "Nope,'' he said. "Bad?'' You're not going to want to see it, I said. And I asked him what it felt like when it happened. "I thought it was broken,'' he said.

In the second half, Roethlisberger had to play tentatively. It was difficult for him to hand off and to drop back to pass; I was surprised the Steelers didn't have him more in the shotgun, where he wouldn't have to move as much. I got scores of tweets last night incredulous that I had my doubts about him being ready to play against the Niners. I understand. Roethlisberger's been a tough customer, as he illustrated last night and for much of his career. And I don't doubt he might be able to get taped liked a mummy, maybe shot up with a painkiller, and be able to play. But you had to see what I saw in the hour after this game. Roethlisberger looked awful. We'll see how much pain he can take and how stationary a game plan the Steelers can create for him, if he decides to give it a shot in San Francisco.

Of course, a loss now could doom Pittsburgh's chances to beat out Baltimore for first place in the AFC North -- and, now, a possible vital bye for Roethlisberger in the first round of the playoffs. A tie with Baltimore does Pittsburgh no good because the Ravens have the tiebreaker edge. Each team has three losses now. A fourth in San Francisco could mean a wild-card game, on the road, for the Steelers, and no week off. So Roethlisberger and the Steelers may look at this upcoming game with more importance than you'd think.

On Harrison:

I've watched the replay maybe 10 times now. Colt McCoy leaves the pocket, runs to his left, tucks the ball under his right arm, and a step or step-and-a-half before making contact with Harrison, pulls the ball out and quickly flips it to Montario Hardesty. Harrison hits McCoy helmet-to-helmet right in McCoy's facemask, and McCoy falls to the turf. Harrison gets flagged for roughing the passer.

Here's where the debate comes in, and why I believe it will be hard for the NFL to suspend Harrison: If McCoy was viewed as a runner -- which he surely would be while having the ball tucked under his arm, with no intention of throwing it -- then once he is out of the pocket, he is treated like a running back, not a quarterback. And a runner can be hit helmet-to-helmet without penalty.

But if a quarterback leaves the pocket with the intention still to pass, he loses some protection from the rules of being in the pocket. He can be hit low, and the one-step rule about hitting a quarterback after the release of the ball goes away.

After the game, Harrison told reporters: "From what I understand, once the quarterback leaves the pocket, he's considered a runner.''

Not exactly. If he leaves the pocket and looks to be intending to throw, he can't be hit helmet-to-helmet. If he leaves the pocket and appears to be a runner, he can be hit helmet-to-helmet.

It'll be a close call for discipline czars Ray Anderson and Merton Hanks to decide next week. And Harrison should have aimed lower anyway. But I don't know how they look at the replay and say McCoy isn't a runner when he has the ball tucked under his right arm. And is running.

Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/peter_king/12/09/week-14/index.html#ixzz1gEUL98kO

FanSince72
12-11-2011, 10:28 AM
But I don't know how they look at the replay and say McCoy isn't a runner when he has the ball tucked under his right arm. And is running.

Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/peter_king/12/09/week-14/index.html#ixzz1gEUL98kO


If this argument was presented in a court before a jury, there would be more than enough reasonable doubt to either hang that jury or acquit the defendant. This is not a black and white issue like Suh's behavior which was clearly beyond the rules. In Harrison's case, there is enough ambiguity to even bring the issue of a fine into question, let alone a suspension.

Sometimes - no matter how much someone wants a person to be guilty of something, they simply aren't guilty of anything.

This is one of those times.

Chadmagic
12-11-2011, 09:56 PM
And yet guilty or not, he will still get a fine, because he got the flag. And Goodell likes to make Harrison his example for the rest of the NFL.

TRH
12-11-2011, 10:16 PM
If this argument was presented in a court before a jury, there would be more than enough reasonable doubt to either hang that jury or acquit the defendant. This is not a black and white issue like Suh's behavior which was clearly beyond the rules. In Harrison's case, there is enough ambiguity to even bring the issue of a fine into question, let alone a suspension.

Sometimes - no matter how much someone wants a person to be guilty of something, they simply aren't guilty of anything.

This is one of those times.


One problem is that this particular league office is not run like a court of law. It's a dictatorship, akin to somewhere in the middle east or south america.
So there goes fairness thrown out the window.

Busforever
12-11-2011, 10:18 PM
Take care of Big Ben, don't force a come back if not necessary. Do you realize that a second place in AFC North means a WC game against the Broncos? I'd like to see James "the evil" Harrison rushing at Tebow:tt02:

LVSteelersfan
12-12-2011, 12:47 AM
Harrison is an idiot. If he kept his big mouth shut instead of calling the commissioner out he might get a more lenient decision. Even though he was right, you can never tell your boss that he is stupid. And el commissar is the boss whether we like it or not.