PDA

View Full Version : Bound and Gagged: Tomlin Giving Into NFL, Tells Steelers To Stay Mum


Whodis
12-16-2011, 07:06 PM
Last year the Steelers locker room was more fired up than the Pacific ring of fire any time a fine was doled out by the NFL for ‘illegal hits.’ This year that tone has continued, yet slightly subdued. Now, at a time when players should be spitting more venom than a cobra, the locker room is quiet and only whispered ‘No comments’ fill the air.
Why the change in tone? Head coach Mike Tomlin told his players to keep quiet over their feelings about the NFL’s recent punishment to James Harrison. In fact, according to safety Troy Polamalu, Tomlin told players to react with, ‘No comment.’ And like the good little soldiers they are, they are indeed staying quiet – save for Ike Taylor who at least used other punishments as a litmus to ‘compare’ how unfair Harrison’s suspension really is.
“Man, they’re tripping. I don’t know what it is. [Harrison's] getting it handed to him in the NFL way … He didn’t stomp on nobody, he didn’t punch nobody’s private area.”
The stomp and punch refer to Detroit’s Ndamukong Suh for stomping a Green Bay Packer on Thanksgiving and Richard Seymour for punching a Miami Dolphins’ lineman at the beginning of December. Both are repeat offenders for post whistle activities, neither have been suspended. Harrison has been naughty during the whistle, and his actions have been football related. Suh and Seymour’s actions are things you find out on the street or in a bar brawl (minus the splintering chairs) – with the full intent on hurting or injure someone. Harrison’s hits are intended to be football plays with the intent to intimidate and make players think twice of running to his side of the field. Hard hits are part of the game. High hits have always been part of the game. But I think we can all agree that Harrison’s hits have never been with the intent on giving a guy a concussion or result in prolonged damage. Yet, Harrison is painted that way by the media who villainize him like his actions are equal to Suh’s or Seymour’s or your local knifer looking to score some crack on the street.
It’s bull shit and Tomlin should be allowing his players to be as vocal as they want to be. By him keeping his players silent, it’s like he himself is agreeing with the league’s decision on Harrison. Tomlin met with the Commish and other league officials earlier this season about illegal hits coming from his team. I don’t know what was said by either side. But it looks like Tomlin is ready to lie down and take it from the league. Maybe they said, ‘Hey if you still want everyone in this league to think of you as a classy solid coach and you don’t want the media to tear you down, then you should just keep your and your team’s mouths shut.’ Too conspiratorial? Not enough?
Either way, it’s crap. And, I’m really P.O. that Tomlin is just letting a punishment like this happen with nothing being said. Complacency for this kind of stuff will only enable and embolden the league to keep dishing out penalties that are too severe within the context of the offense. It will send a trickle down effect that will cause players to second guess their technique and how they play and how they execute – remember Larry Foote on Arian Foster back in Week 4?
The players being bound and gagged by their own coach is a chilling situation. I’m glad Taylor said at least something. But it’s just not enough.

http://nicepickcowher.com/2011/12/15/bound-and-gagged-tomlin-giving-into-nfl-tells-steelers-to-stay-mum/

steelersfan77
12-16-2011, 07:12 PM
I've finally figured it out and I can't believe it's taken me this long.

If we keep quiet off the field maybe the commisioner will leave us alone on the field for a change.

Atlanta Dan
12-16-2011, 07:15 PM
http://www.morethings.com/fan/quentin_tarantino/pulp_fiction/pulp_fiction3360.jpg

Photo of Harrison and Roethlisberger at NFL league office waiting for their suspension appeal hearings with Goodell

SteelCityMom
12-16-2011, 07:18 PM
Listen, if they're really that pissed off about this, maybe they should stage a coup, or at the very least quit their jobs, or resign from the NFL. Start your own league...others have done it before, with great success.

Tomlins only mistake (IMO) was not telling his players to keep their damn mouths shut to the media earlier. There's no need for it anyway. You can be pissed off about something and not have to air it out to the media, you know. You'll still be as pissed off, but you won't have to deal with the attention (unless you want it). Simply put, don't spout off about something unless you're prepared to take action against it...and I'm going to go ahead and assume that the players in todays high paid NFL system aren't going to risk their paychecks to find a newer and crappier job.

If you're not going to quit the league though, or start your own league, just shut up and play. All the rest is just media fodder.

steelersfan77
12-16-2011, 07:42 PM
I respectfully disagree with the shut up and play line. They gotta keep voicing their opinions. The players drive the NFL economy, put butts in seats, make owners profit which allows them to hand out paychecks and make the commisioner more big headed than ever. Without these talented players, there are only a select few that can make it, the the NFL is nothing but a less talented league. The CFL. Players drive this league.

Don't be a yes man. Sorry SCMOM. You're wrong.

We can agree to disagree but I'm not changing my stance.

Danny136200
12-16-2011, 07:49 PM
What is the point of speaking out any ways?? there is no need for it and will only bring more animosity to the team. It is better to keep their mouths shut and play the game! The steelers speaking out will not bring Harrison back for the niners game, just keep quite and play the game fired up! and there is also no need for them to state their stances, we already know they are against it.

SteelCityMom
12-16-2011, 07:50 PM
I respectfully disagree with the shut up and play line. They gotta keep voicing their opinions. The players drive the NFL economy, put butts in seats, make owners profit which allows them to hand out paychecks and make the commisioner more big headed than ever. Without these talented players, there are only a select few that can make it, the the NFL is nothing but a less talented league. The CFL. Players drive this league.

Don't be a yes man. Sorry SCMOM. You're wrong.

We can agree to disagree but I'm not changing my stance.

That's fine if you disagree with my stance, but just know that I don't completely disagree with yours either.

My point is that most of these criticisms ring hollow. Unless the players are ready to take action against these rules, then what is the point of voicing your opinion? Answer: there is no point unless you're willing to do something about it.

I think it is hypocritical of them to be happy to accept paychecks from a system they seem to have no problem criticizing. If they want to stop this cycle, then they can quit and start their own league.

The best example I can give is a Senator, or Congressman (or even a citizen) who criticizes the way the nation is run, but never does anything substantial about it.

Bayz101
12-16-2011, 07:54 PM
Let's say you work at BurgerKing. Someone drives up to the window, and you say "What the hell can I get you today?". That's not an acceptable thing to say under that sort of employment, or really, any modern employment.

Now the NFL employs players to work Sunday's, Monday's and sometimes Thursday's. With the NFL you have a standard set of rules, a set of rules that are subject to change at any given time. Now let's get one thing clear. I DO NOT agree with some of these rules.

But unfortunately, rules are rules. What the big man says, goes. It sucks. I know. I hate the fact that small hits are being highlighted by the media and are ultimately resulting in fines and suspensions. the League is being softened. It sucks. But unless new leadership comes in and changes the guidelines, you must stay within the current standard.

Or your fired. Suspended. Fined. It's a job. You see what i'm saying?

Steelersfan87
12-16-2011, 08:26 PM
While I feel that players should theoretically be able to speak their minds, I also understand that sometimes it's not always in their best interests, as with Harrison. I also feel that they should be more educated on the topics they choose to discuss. As much as I love the guy as a football player and as much of a good heart as he may have, the comments that Harrison has made over the past couple of season regarding concussions seriously just spews ignorance, and I seriously question how well he understands just what a concussion does to one's body. Many players in fact, have said things to the effect that they'd rather have their bell rung than have their knee blown out (i.e. they'd rather tackle a guy or be tackled by a guy high than low). If they were more educated about concussions, would they still feel the same way? They may have difficulty walking after a while, but at least they'd be able to feed and bathe themselves.

TRH
12-16-2011, 09:28 PM
I don't think anyone should be "told to shut up" and not air their thoughts. The NFL is trying to manipulate everything and control the media, among other things. It's not much different than the way Vince McMahon treats his WWE product.
But i don't fault Tomlin on this. At all. He's already stated countless times that he hasn't agreed with league decisions and such. If he takes it any farther, its not going to do this team any good and he's going to be looking at a HUUUUUUUGE fine himself. There's no good that will come out of it, if Tomlin says any more than he already has. Our bullseye will just keep getting bigger and bigger.

Boomer
12-16-2011, 11:09 PM
I would think that he's telling players to keep quite to the outside media folks, but you gotta think that when it's just the players and coaches in the locker room, they are mad as hell and are letting it show. We'll know Monday night if they are mad and take it out on SF or if they have given in to roger the retard and just roll over and quit.

Bayz101
12-17-2011, 02:00 AM
I would think that he's telling players to keep quite to the outside media folks, but you gotta think that when it's just the players and coaches in the locker room, they are mad as hell and are letting it show. We'll know Monday night if they are mad and take it out on SF or if they have given in to roger the retard and just roll over and quit.

He wants them to do their talking on the gridiron. The Steelers have never been a media franchise, and they've never needed to be. We've always came from under the radar. Brady and his Patriots get the airtime, and we win number 5&6. Now it's the Packers added to the mix with the perfect Rodgers. Time to come from under the radar and stomp on the competition!

skip
12-17-2011, 08:30 AM
Listen, if they're really that pissed off about this, maybe they should stage a coup, or at the very least quit their jobs, or resign from the NFL. Start your own league...others have done it before, with great success.

Tomlins only mistake (IMO) was not telling his players to keep their damn mouths shut to the media earlier. There's no need for it anyway. You can be pissed off about something and not have to air it out to the media, you know. You'll still be as pissed off, but you won't have to deal with the attention (unless you want it). Simply put, don't spout off about something unless you're prepared to take action against it...and I'm going to go ahead and assume that the players in todays high paid NFL system aren't going to risk their paychecks to find a newer and crappier job.

If you're not going to quit the league though, or start your own league, just shut up and play. All the rest is just media fodder.

Yeah, I think you're absolutely right. Voicing individual opinions to the media on this issue is not an effective strategy for change. The corporate media are going to spin everything to serve their own interests anyway. And if they can't do that, they just won't print it. They only print what's consistent with the interests of owners and elites, because they're pretty much the same people.

The only real bargaining power that players have is through their union. But, as you mentioned, there is a serious lack of solidarity among its members. There are various reasons for this, mainly the enormous disparity in salaries across the league. Getting the union to organize around an ostensibly narrow issue like penalty fines & suspensions is not going to happen unless the players understand what's really at stake. There are broader implications to consider. As a fan on another message board pointed out, imposing huge fines disproportionately protects certain players while hurting others. When you single out for punishment individuals who are only doing their jobs, it has the effect of further weakening solidarity among players and puts the owners in a position to impose further constraints.

That said, fans are right to demand that players step up and speak out against these fines/suspensions, which are highly disruptive. The fans are the players' strongest advocates. If players are serious about opposing these hit restrictions, then the union needs to stand together and make some demands. That's the only way they can raise the costs high enough for the owners to win a compromise. They owe at least that much to the fans.

wera176
12-17-2011, 08:58 AM
I agree with SCMom, Boomer and others. Tomlin is handling this 100% correct. There is NOTHING to be gained by the players or Tomlin whining to the media. Most of them have voiced support of their team mate in public, enough said. Fact is that it is hard to argue it in the current climate. Regardless if any of us or them agree with the suspension, James did NOT need to hit him in the head, it WAS an illegal hit, and James knew it. He's STILL my favorite Defensive player and even I'm ticked at him. I hate that he is missing a game, but he brought it on himself. As soon as he hit McCoy, I started to scream at him on the TV. If that was Suggs or Lewis hitting Ben the same way we'd all be scream for blood and probably ticked it was only 1 game. I know I would be....

It's what goes on behind the locker room doors that really matters anyhow. He has their support, and that's whats important.

Whodis
12-17-2011, 11:48 AM
Insinuating that Harrison isn't playing within the rules is far from "supportive". It seem as if most players on defense disagree with the punishment and how it's levied. I wonder if Tomlin has the locker room?

If it were Suggs or Lewis? Hasn't it already happen? It's obvious that the Steelers are held to a different set of rules. There is no rhyme or reason to the way punishment is handed down. I believe that is the point.

Curtain_of_Steel
12-17-2011, 01:24 PM
Another of my favorite threads... lol

Tomlin needs to practice what he preaches. If he doesn;t want his players talking, than he should heed his own advice. Equally do not toss your player under the bus like he did with Harrison.

4xSBChamps
12-17-2011, 01:38 PM
We've always came from under the radar. Brady and his Patriots get the airtime, and we win number 5&6. Now it's the Packers added to the mix with the perfect Rodgers. Time to come from under the radar and stomp on the competition!

a perfect ending to this season would be the Steelers throttling the Packers in SB46, with Harrison drawing 6 holding-calls, making a dozen unpenalized tackles, a pair of clean sacks that cause Rogers to leave the game with minor injuries, another game-changing interception return for the game-winning TD, and earning the MVP award:
upon getting onto the stage with Ms. Goodell, he should smile, take the microphone, tell her to 'stick that silver football up your azz ~ I'm retiring, beeyotch!!!', and walk-away from the game

Steelersfan87
12-17-2011, 02:35 PM
Tomlin did not throw anybody under the bus. The insinuations in this thread are absurd. Does anybody seriously doubt whether or not Tomlin "has the locker room"? The same person that came in second in a poll of players about who they would want to play for? Of course Tomlin has the locker room, he's one of the most respected coaches in the league. Every time a player false starts or holds or does anything that gets a flag, he's "playing illegally", and that's a factual statement. Acknowledging after one of your players gets suspended that the hit he got suspended for was against the rules is by no means throwing him under the bus. It would be completely idiotic for a head coach to deny it. And it would be pointless to act like nothing ever happened in your press conference as if questions are not going to be asked about it, Do you really think it would be beneficial for the team if it appeared to the league that the team's head coach doesn't understand the rules and that he's fine with his players giving people concussions? Do you want that kind of attention and scrutiny from the league? Tomlin said that Kemo was playing illegally and that if he doesn't stop he won't get another chance to play too, but I don't hear anybody whining about Tomlin throwing HIM under the bus. Is it because the fans have already done so to such an extent that his body was rent asunder by the tires already?

Steelerindc
12-17-2011, 03:16 PM
I hate the rules and the way the rules are applied as much as any of you but clearly the NFL is not a democracy. There really is no way to keep the commissioner in check or veto a ruling.

So to keep wafting to the rafters doesn't benefit them at all. Just keep playing ball and win.....win again and again.

That's the only way the Steelers get justice.

FanSince72
12-17-2011, 03:28 PM
a perfect ending to this season would be the Steelers throttling the Packers in SB46, with Harrison drawing 6 holding-calls, making a dozen unpenalized tackles, a pair of clean sacks that cause Rogers to leave the game with minor injuries, another game-changing interception return for the game-winning TD, and earning the MVP award:
upon getting onto the stage with Ms. Goodell, he should smile, take the microphone, tell her to 'stick that silver football up your azz ~ I'm retiring, beeyotch!!!', and walk-away from the game

That works for me!

Except I could think of having him add at least a paragraph of something far more colorful than just "beeyotch".

And of course the image of Goodell hobbling around with a Lombardi trophy sticking out of his back door would be priceless! :rofl:

Bayz101
12-17-2011, 03:31 PM
Yeah, I think you're absolutely right. Voicing individual opinions to the media on this issue is not an effective strategy for change. The corporate media are going to spin everything to serve their own interests anyway. And if they can't do that, they just won't print it. They only print what's consistent with the interests of owners and elites, because they're pretty much the same people.

The only real bargaining power that players have is through their union. But, as you mentioned, there is a serious lack of solidarity among its members. There are various reasons for this, mainly the enormous disparity in salaries across the league. Getting the union to organize around an ostensibly narrow issue like penalty fines & suspensions is not going to happen unless the players understand what's really at stake. There are broader implications to consider. As a fan on another message board pointed out, imposing huge fines disproportionately protects certain players while hurting others. When you single out for punishment individuals who are only doing their jobs, it has the effect of further weakening solidarity among players and puts the owners in a position to impose further constraints.

That said, fans are right to demand that players step up and speak out against these fines/suspensions, which are highly disruptive. The fans are the players' strongest advocates. If players are serious about opposing these hit restrictions, then the union needs to stand together and make some demands. That's the only way they can raise the costs high enough for the owners to win a compromise. They owe at least that much to the fans.

:thumbsup:

wera176
12-17-2011, 06:08 PM
Tomlin did not throw anybody under the bus. The insinuations in this thread are absurd. Does anybody seriously doubt whether or not Tomlin "has the locker room"? The same person that came in second in a poll of players about who they would want to play for? Of course Tomlin has the locker room, he's one of the most respected coaches in the league. Every time a player false starts or holds or does anything that gets a flag, he's "playing illegally", and that's a factual statement. Acknowledging after one of your players gets suspended that the hit he got suspended for was against the rules is by no means throwing him under the bus. It would be completely idiotic for a head coach to deny it. And it would be pointless to act like nothing ever happened in your press conference as if questions are not going to be asked about it, Do you really think it would be beneficial for the team if it appeared to the league that the team's head coach doesn't understand the rules and that he's fine with his players giving people concussions? Do you want that kind of attention and scrutiny from the league? Tomlin said that Kemo was playing illegally and that if he doesn't stop he won't get another chance to play too, but I don't hear anybody whining about Tomlin throwing HIM under the bus. Is it because the fans have already done so to such an extent that his body was rent asunder by the tires already?

Well put! :thumbsup:

Fact is, Harrison gave a QB a concussion with an illegal helmet to helmet hit. McCoy may miss this week as a result. I don't feel bad for McCoy, it's football, but there is no denying what happened. I'll bet a dime to a dollar that James (and I'd bet Tomlin) was warned the last time that if he did again he'd face a suspension. Not whining to the press is not the same as not being supportive...

Whodis
12-17-2011, 07:15 PM
Do you really think it would be beneficial for the team if it appeared to the league that the team's head coach doesn't understand the rules and that he's fine with his players giving people concussions?

Do you know the rules? If so, explain them to us and please give examples of the fairness they have been given out across the board. I didn't say he didn't have the locker room. However, unlike yourself I don't know for sure if players feel the coach should not stick up for his players. it was an open question on a forum to ask an opinion (like yours).

Tomlin has stayed quiet for over a year about the inconsistency of punishment given out by the NFL. My question to you is... Has that been beneficial?

Curtain_of_Steel
12-17-2011, 07:34 PM
Pretty much what I said, except, a spear to the chest taking goodell off the podium.

He would go down in history as the man with the biggest set. Could he be fined? No, season is over and he reitred, lol.

Yes, Tomlin tossed James under the boss, by commenting before the appeal process was done. He didn't need to comment. He only needed to say, " he will comment when the process goes its course, we stand behind James"

But no, he made stupid comments!

Steelersfan87
12-17-2011, 10:34 PM
Do you know the rules? If so, explain them to us and please give examples of the fairness they have been given out across the board. I didn't say he didn't have the locker room. However, unlike yourself I don't know for sure if players feel the coach should not stick up for his players. it was an open question on a forum to ask an opinion (like yours).

Tomlin has stayed quiet for over a year about the inconsistency of punishment given out by the NFL. My question to you is... Has that been beneficial?

Here is the rule: thou shalt not smash a quarterback's face with your face immediately after he throws the ball, even if it seemed like he was going to run. Whether or not the rule is ENFORCED consistently is a completely different subject. But there is no debate that Harrison's hit was illegal. It's not even close. The rule is very explicit about the fact that it doesn't matter if the QB is out of the pocket, if he has just released the ball, he still has 'defenseless player' protection, namely, you can't hit him in the head.

Coaches should NOT "stick up" for their players if by "stick up" you mean "illogically defend an obviously illegal hit". He never said that he agreed that he should be suspended for the hit, he just said that they "accept" the punishment; they don't have a choice but to accept it. If "throwing under the bus" means "acknowledging that a player has been punished and acknowledging that what the player was suspended for actually happened", then yeah, Tomlin threw Harrison under the bus. But that would be a really stupid definition of "throwing under the bus". What exactly was so wrong about what Tomlin said? Can somebody that has their panties in a twist about what Tomlin said about Harrison's situation explain what was so bad and traitorous about it?

tony hipchest
12-17-2011, 10:50 PM
http://www.morethings.com/fan/quentin_tarantino/pulp_fiction/pulp_fiction3360.jpg

Photo of Harrison and Roethlisberger at NFL league office waiting for their suspension appeal hearings with Goodell

:sofunny: that is GREAT! :applaudit:

tomlin is very smart. he knows when to choose his battles and how to pick them wisely.

if anyone thinks this organization hasnt been supportive of its players (even ben w/the bunk rape allegations) they havent been paying attention.

unfortunately goodell has the steelers under his thumb with the majority of the teams backing him. the rooneys know this, and mike tomlin klnows this.

it is what it is, and will continue to be. you can only fight the system so much.

Twentyvalve
12-17-2011, 10:53 PM
If you think there was not communication between Goodell and Tomlin before that statement, think again. My guess is there was, and that was a calculated statement by Tomlin. Most public statements regarding the league are not made willy-nilly, they are said for a reason to satisfy an agenda. We do not have any idea what Goodell and Tomlin talked about, and as I said, you can bet they discusses something.

Which makes me angry, because I bet Goodell told Tomling basically what to say or else. Which reinforces my opinion, and many others, that Goodell has a personal agenda, which is separate from his thinly guised veil of player safety.

I don't think he threw Harrison under the bus. I think his statement was in response to what Goodell directed. I am sure Tomlin and Harrison are cool, and Tomlin is with Harrison all the way and supports him on the field, in the locker room, etc. Media generated statements are just that, and as fans, we often base our entire bank of knowledge on those. We have to realize that. They have personal relationship and rapport that even the exalted media, or Goodell, has access to.




Pretty much what I said, except, a spear to the chest taking goodell off the podium.

He would go down in history as the man with the biggest set. Could he be fined? No, season is over and he reitred, lol.

Yes, Tomlin tossed James under the boss, by commenting before the appeal process was done. He didn't need to comment. He only needed to say, " he will comment when the process goes its course, we stand behind James"

But no, he made stupid comments!

Whodis
12-18-2011, 07:18 AM
Can somebody that has their panties in a twist about what Tomlin said about Harrison's situation explain what was so bad and traitorous about it?

The league is to mercurial when is comes to divvying up the punishment. Thats what gets my "panties in a bunch". I find it hypocritical when no one other then the Commish himself has decided to change a game. And don't pull the "player safety" card because this is the same league that didn't want to cover player healthcare after they retire.

So let me get this right, you agree with all the punishment Harrison got handed down? The Brees hit? Is there a good time for a leader to step up to the podium and say "Enough is enough"?

Steelersfan87
12-18-2011, 06:06 PM
Actually the owners voted on rule changes this past offseason. And Goodell doesn't hand out the fines either.

I never said that I agreed with Harrison's suspension. The Brees hit was kind of dubious because it was a facemask to the back, but I guess by the rules it was the "right" call, despite being lame. The one that was complete bull was the hit on Fitzpatrick. As far as your desire for Tomlin to make some kind of stand, I don't think this is the line in the sand you want to draw just yet.

Bayz101
12-18-2011, 06:19 PM
Actually the owners voted on rule changes this past offseason. And Goodell doesn't hand out the fines either.

I never said that I agreed with Harrison's suspension. The Brees hit was kind of dubious because it was a facemask to the back, but I guess by the rules it was the "right" call, despite being lame. The one that was complete bull was the hit on Fitzpatrick. As far as your desire for Tomlin to make some kind of stand, I don't think this is the line in the sand you want to draw just yet.

'He did the right thing by keeping quiet. Negative attention is not what we need when we're in good position to take control of the AFC.

Whodis
12-18-2011, 07:20 PM
Actually the Steelers owners voted against it

Steelersfan87
12-18-2011, 07:34 PM
No they didn't. I think you're thinking of some Steelers players voting against the CBA. The new rules were voted in unanimously.

http://www.steelers.com/news/article-1/Teams-to-face-discipline-for-hits-too/d6c0afce-fb83-4973-b17d-ad604f977b30

When these issues were presented as part of the NFL owners’ meetings in late March, they were tabled, at least partly because the league’s coaches weren’t completely satisfied that there was clarity on how they were to be implemented. But on Tuesday, with no coaches around, the league’s 32 owners voted unanimously to approve rules amendments directed at enhanced player safety.

Included in this was a measure aimed at penalizing a player for launching himself into a defenseless opponent, and it also should be noted that the definition of what constitutes a defenseless player has been broadened.

With these changes, a defenseless player now is defined as those throwing a pass; attempting or completing a catch without having time to ward off or avoid contact; a runner whose forward progress has been stopped by a tackler; kickoff or punt returners while the ball is in the air; kickers or punters during a kick or a return; a quarterback during a change of possession; a player who receives a blindside block from a blocker moving toward his own end zone.

It will be a 15-yard penalty for anyone who launches himself to hit a defenseless player, and such tackles also will be subject to fines.

But it was after NFL vice president Adolpho Birch III said the league will punish a team if its players are fined multiple times for illegal hits when Daniel Kaplan of Sports Business Journal tweeted that reporters covering the meetings in Indianapolis already were calling the policy the Anti-Steelers Rule.

In a subsequent story on USAToday.com, long-time NFL reporter Jarrett Bell wrote, “Art Rooney II isn’t too thrilled that a planned new NFL policy to police excessive flagrant fouls was quickly tagged with a nickname: The Pittsburgh Steelers Rule. Yet the Steelers president understands the intent: Player safety.”

“I’m going to reserve judgment on it now,” Rooney told Bell. “I’m not going to say I’m opposed to it. I would hope that it’s something that is used judiciously, that is sort of reserved for repeated type of conduct. I think if it’s handled that way, it’ll probably be effective. It’s still under discussion.”

Whodis
12-19-2011, 06:54 AM
that is what I was thinking, I stand corrected.