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4xSBChamps
01-27-2012, 12:57 PM
he recently turned 80 years-old, and when I saw this article, I thought some here may enjoy

http://www.cleveland.com/browns/index.ssf/2008/12/the_invisible_legend_a_nearrec.html

many of the younger fans, who weren't around for the 'S.O.S.' (Same Old Steelers) years don't, and can't, grasp the concept of how he changed the culture of this now-proud franchise

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y272/Glensgages/football/ChuckNollnumber65ClevelandBrowns.jpg

the comments at the bottom of the page are good, too (he taught two things learned from Paul Brown ~ hard hitting tackling and hard hitting blocking. The rest followed naturally.)

MDSteel15
01-27-2012, 02:13 PM
Awesome read! :thumbsup:

California-Steel
01-27-2012, 06:07 PM
Thanks.

Bayz101
01-27-2012, 06:20 PM
Great read, great post.

55BaileyFan
01-27-2012, 06:56 PM
I chose my football number in High School and College because of him...#65...TRUE LEGEND

FanSince72
01-27-2012, 07:06 PM
"Noll had a gift of allowing players to be themselves within the team system"

That's the whole "winning" thing in a nutshell.

4xSBChamps
01-28-2012, 05:33 AM
"Noll had a gift of allowing players to be themselves within the team system"

That's the whole "winning" thing in a nutshell.

it would hard to imagine such coaches as Brown, Ewbank, Lombardi, Landry, and Noll even being considered for a Head Coaching job today, as they were known as strict disciplinarians in their day, a much-more conservative time

ricardisimo
01-28-2012, 05:58 AM
it would hard to imagine such coaches as Brown, Ewbank, Lombardi, Landry, and Noll even being considered for a Head Coaching job today, as they were known as strict disciplinarians in their day, a much-more conservative time
Noll rarely yelled at his men, a trait Dungy said he gleaned from him. It's not so "old" or "conservative" as you make it out to be.

4xSBChamps
01-28-2012, 06:04 AM
Noll rarely yelled at his men, a trait Dungy said he gleaned from him. It's not so "old" or "conservative" as you make it out to be.

other-than Brown & Lombardi, it's possible that few of these coaches were yell & scream types, but I think they'd have a hard time accepting today's players' me-me-me attitude, and the post-play & off-field shenanigans as 'being themselves':
that's all

:thumbsup:

ricardisimo
01-28-2012, 06:25 AM
other-than Brown & Lombardi, it's possible that few of these coaches were yell & scream types, but I think they'd have a hard time accepting today's players' me-me-me attitude, and the post-play & off-field shenanigans as 'being themselves':
that's all

:thumbsup:
I don't know. We romanticize our Steelers quite a bit, including Noll, who put up with an awful lot of bullshit from the likes of Ernie Holmes and others. When in doubt, it's safe to assume that yesterday was just like today, which will be exactly like tomorrow.

FrancoLambert
01-28-2012, 07:50 AM
he recently turned 80 years-old, and when I saw this article, I thought some here may enjoy

http://www.cleveland.com/browns/index.ssf/2008/12/the_invisible_legend_a_nearrec.html

many of the younger fans, who weren't around for the 'S.O.S.' (Same Old Steelers) years don't, and can't, grasp the concept of how he changed the culture of this now-proud franchise

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y272/Glensgages/football/ChuckNollnumber65ClevelandBrowns.jpg

the comments at the bottom of the page are good, too (he taught two things learned from Paul Brown ~ hard hitting tackling and hard hitting blocking. The rest followed naturally.)

Tomlin's "the standard is the standard" mantra often hides the fact that this guy is the one who set the standard not only for his team (at the time) but for the entire organization going forward.
Noll was awesome. The Steelers will never escape the shadow he cast on this organization. :hatsoff:

FanSince72
01-28-2012, 09:12 AM
it would hard to imagine such coaches as Brown, Ewbank, Lombardi, Landry, and Noll even being considered for a Head Coaching job today, as they were known as strict disciplinarians in their day, a much-more conservative time

I don't know if "conservative" is what it was about.

The 70's were certainly not a conservative time (I basically remember it as a non-stop party)

I think it just has to do with simple respect.
I sometimes believe that my generation (I'm 54 now) was one of the last ones that was taught simple things like manners and respect for others and that a work ethic is something that applies to all aspects of life, not just for jobs that pay well.

Noll obviously came from that era but his players did too. As the years moved on, each successive generation became more self-centered and as each generation had kids, they taught the next one even less about such things. The so-called "movers and shakers" we have today are basically a bunch of whiny brats who have no idea what it's like to actually honor a commitment or follow through on a promise. All they're interested in is how much they can earn and how fast they can earn it - and that applies to all aspects of life, not just sports.

In Noll's day, guys played pro football as a supplemental income and they needed to win to make more money. It's just like pro golfers back in Arnold's day when often only the top 20 actually got a check for a tournament and the rest just got a handshake and a thank you. Back then, you played well because you had to eat.
But it was more than that. Back then, if someone showed enough confidence in someone's ability, you just did a good job because you owed them that, whether you were a football player or a factory worker.

Today, pro athletes see the pro's as having "arrived". They see it as the destination and the end of the ride when in reality it's just the beginning. Back in Noll's day, players knew that just getting to the pro's was half the battle because they knew they had to prove themselves in order to stay. But today, some kid gets more in signing bonuses and endorsement deals than he does in salary - and that's before he even gets out of college, so I'm actually MORE amazed that we even HAVE people who are willing to work hard these days and I'd consider someone blessed if they had an entire team that thought that way.

I know that every generation says that it had it better in "their day" and that's probably true in terms of many things. But in terms of things like the way we treat people and how we regard others and how we work with others, I've seen this world become more and more selfish and more and more "I got mine" and I think that's sad.
There's nothing wrong with a little respect and there's nothing wrong with earning something instead of having something handed to you and that gratification doesn't always have to happen instantly.

In fact, it's often more gratifying if you have to work hard for it.