PDA

View Full Version : Junior Seau dead?


Vis
05-02-2012, 02:06 PM
2m (https://twitter.com/#%21/Steelersdepot/status/197748041699168256) https://twimg0-a.akamaihd.net/profile_images/408421355/twitterProfilePhoto_normal.jpg Steelers Depot ‏ @Steelersdepot (https://twitter.com/#%21/Steelersdepot)
TMZ reporting that Junior Seau MIGHT be dead.

(https://twitter.com/#)


(https://twitter.com/#)
Police Respond To Junior Seau's Oceanside Home

Large Police Response Reported At Junior Seau's Oceanside Home

POSTED: 10:50 am PDT May 2, 2012
http://www.10news.com/sh/storytools/storytools_delicious.gif (http://del.icio.us/post?title=Police%20Respond%20To%20Junior%20Seau%2 7s%20Oceanside%20Home&url=http://www.10news.com/news/30993007/detail.html)http://www.10news.com/sh/storytools/storytools_reddit.gif (http://reddit.com/submit?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.10news.com%2Fnews%2F30 993007%2Fdetail.html&title=Police%20Respond%20To%20Junior%20Seau%27s%20 Oceanside%20Home)http://www.10news.com/sh/storytools/storytools_digg.gif (http://digg.com/submit?phase=2&title=Police%20Respond%20To%20Junior%20Seau%27s%20 Oceanside%20Home&url=http://www.10news.com/news/30993007/detail.html)http://www.10news.com/sh/storytools/storytools_facebook.gif (http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=http://www.10news.com/news/30993007/detail.html&src=sc&pos=top&from_posted=1)http://www.10news.com/sh/storytools/storytools_rss.gif (http://www.10news.com/rss/)http://www.10news.com/sh/storytools/storytools_print.gifhttp://www.10news.com/sh/storytools/storytools_email.gif

SAN DIEGO -- Oceanside Police have apparently responded to Junior Seau's home on South The Strand in Oceanside.

Oceanside Police confirmed that something is going on in the area but would not give details other than to say further information is coming.

A witness told 10News that police responded with a large presence at the location at about 10 a.m. and closed the roadway. The witness also told 10News that a gunshot was heard inside Seau's home. 10News has not confirmed reports of the gunshot but we are working to report the latest accurate details on 10News Midday at 11 a.m. and online.More will be posted as it becomes available.

Vis
05-02-2012, 02:07 PM
EXCLUSIVE: Junior Seau -- Cops Investigating Shooting Involving NFL Star








Cops in Oceanside, CA are investigating a possible shooting involving former NFL star Junior Seau ... law enforcement sources tell TMZ. We spoke with an investigator in the coroner's office .. who told us they got a call to respond to the scene ... though the details surrounding the situation are still unclear. Cops are currently at a residence where 43-year-old Junior is believed to be staying. People in law enforcement are telling us Junior Seau is dead ... but we are unable to confirm that right now.

Vis
05-02-2012, 02:14 PM
it appears that Junior Seau, former Charger Linebacker, who had been having problems and suspected of trying to kill himself before, may have just shot himself to death up the road in Oceanside. Gun shots fired, people lined up crying outside his home in the street.

Vis
05-02-2012, 02:15 PM
NFL legend Junior Seau was found dead in his home in Oceanside, CA ... and cops are investigating a shooting ... multiple law enforcement sources tell TMZ.

Cops are currently at Seau's home just outside San Diego. Seau was 43-years-old ... and leaves behind 3 kids and an ex-wife.

Seau was a beast in the NFL -- skyrocketing to fame thanks to his explosive play with the San Diego Chargers, Miami Dolphins and New England Patriots. The USC standout was selected in the first round of the NFL draft in 1990 and played in the league for 20 years.

Seau was involved in a car accident back in 2010 when he drove his SUV off a cliff in Carlsbad, CA hours after he was arrested for allegedly attacking his girlfriend. Seau later said he was not trying to kill himself ... insisting he had fallen asleep at the wheel.

http://www.tmz.com/2012/05/02/junior-seau-dead/#.T6F5kNna_c4

Vis
05-02-2012, 02:19 PM
02:16 PM EDT
∞ T witter
Report: 911 Call Reports Possible Suicide At Former NFLer Junior Seau’s Home

Police in California responded on Wednesday morning to a 911 call of a suicide at the Oceanside home of former NFL star Junior Seau, according to UT San Diego.

The newspaper reported that police were called to his two-story house at about 10 a.m. PT.
Reported by Nick Martin

Fire Arians
05-02-2012, 02:31 PM
damn, i could never understand why these athletes with all the money in the world would want to kill themselves. if i had half his money i'd be happy as shit

Vis
05-02-2012, 02:34 PM
It's confirmed now.

stb_steeler
05-02-2012, 03:20 PM
damn, i could never understand why these athletes with all the money in the world would want to kill themselves. if i had half his money i'd be happy as shit

I wouldnt bet on it.......They are just like you an me. We all get depressed one time or another. Even Money cant fix that!.

stb_steeler
05-02-2012, 03:20 PM
It's confirmed now.

Just saw on Woodleys FB.....so sad ;(

tony hipchest
05-02-2012, 03:35 PM
very sad.

sirius says a shotgun wound to the chest. (being compared to dave duerson).

RIP #55

STEELAMANIA
05-02-2012, 03:42 PM
Sad day.


NFL legend Junior Seau found dead at his California home
By Maggie Hendricks | Shutdown Corner – 1 hour 20 minutes ago
186
Email

(Getty)
Former NFL linebacker Junior Seau was found dead Wednesday morning at his Southern California home. The ex-linebacker's girlfriend found the NFL legend with a fatal shotgun wound to the chest. He was 43 years old.
The report has been confirmed by the North County Times:
Pro football great and Oceanside sports legend Junior Seau has apparently committed suicide, found by a housekeeper with a gunshot wound to the chest, according to multiple sources.
Oceanside Mayor Jim Wood said he learned of the death from police Chief Frank McCoy.
Police responded to Seau's home on The Strand on Wednesday after receiving a call about a reported suicide. The San Diego County medical examiner's office said an investigator was sent to the scene.
The San Diego Chargers issued a statement at approximately noon PT:
Everyone at the Chargers is in complete shock and disbelief right now...We ask everyone to stop what they're doing and send their prayers to Junior and his family.
If Seau committed suicide by shooting himself in the chest, it is similar to the way former Chicago Bears great Dave Duerson ended his life. Duerson shot himself in the chest on February 17 -- the method used so that his brain could be examined for symptoms of CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy), a trauma-induced disease common to NFL players and others who have received repeated blows to the head.
Seau, a 12-time Pro Bowler and 6-time First-Team All-Pro, was selected fifth overall in the 1990 NFL draft after an outstanding collegiate career at USC. He played with the San Diego Chargers through the 2002 season, spent 2003-2005 with the Miami Dolphins, and then signed with the New England Patriots in time for the 2006 season. In New England's perfect regular season of 2007, he played in all 16 games and started four. Seau first retires after that season, only to come back and play in 2008 and 2009 before finally leaving the NFL for good.
"I'm going to go surf," he told Showtime upon his January, 2010 retirement announcement. Whatever happens, I can honestly say, that that probably was my last game."
Seau is the eighth member of the Chargers 1994 Super Bowl team to pass. We will keep you updated on this story as more news is confirmed.

Vis
05-02-2012, 03:44 PM
Twitter posts questioning Junior's concussion history. I don't remember him as someone out for a concussion ever. Does anyone else?

Vis
05-02-2012, 03:46 PM
http://forums.steelersfever.com/showthread.php?p=1009870#post1009870

Atlanta Dan
05-02-2012, 07:06 PM
Twitter posts questioning Junior's concussion history. I don't remember him as someone out for a concussion ever. Does anyone else?

That possibility appears to be based at this point on some folks not letting the absence of facts get in the way of using a tragedy to push an agenda

But I think we have to add him to the list of those that we worry about who could have effects of chronic, repetitive brain trauma," said Bailes, chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at the NorthShore University HealthSystem in Chicago.

"We don't have any strong evidence (yet about Seau), and we know that people commit suicide for other reasons. … But to me it's also concerning due to the fact that he had such a long playing history," said Bailes.

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/thehuddle/post/2012/05/neurosurgeon-junior-seaus-death-fuels-concussion-concerns/1

Because it is always a good medical practice to make a dfiagnosis without examining the patient

RIP Mr. Seau - a sad story

Vis
05-02-2012, 07:22 PM
That possibility appears to be based at this point on some folks not letting the absence of facts get in the way of using a tragedy to push an agenda

But I think we have to add him to the list of those that we worry about who could have effects of chronic, repetitive brain trauma," said Bailes, chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at the NorthShore University HealthSystem in Chicago.

"We don't have any strong evidence (yet about Seau), and we know that people commit suicide for other reasons. But to me it's also concerning due to the fact that he had such a long playing history," said Bailes.

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/thehuddle/post/2012/05/neurosurgeon-junior-seaus-death-fuels-concussion-concerns/1

Because it is always a good medical practice to make a dfiagnosis without examining the patient

RIP Mr. Seau - a sad story

Suicide means autopsy. We will see. I handle a lot of TBI cases. Frontal lobe injuries do change a person.

steeltheone
05-02-2012, 07:59 PM
RIP JS

JPPT1974
05-02-2012, 08:02 PM
Thoughts and prayers are with his family. So sad to hear that!

TRH
05-02-2012, 09:33 PM
People are starting to abuse the "concussion theories" and blame that for everything now. Unreal.

SteelersinCA
05-03-2012, 01:45 AM
Seau was known for being an asshole in San Diego. I'm not trying to spit on the guy's grave but, I doubt this had much to do with concussion and more to do with not being the big man on campus syndrome any longer. He tried broadcasting, reality TV, anything to stay in the lime light and relevant.

Sad for his family.

Vis
05-03-2012, 04:14 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/03/sports/football/03duerson.html?_r=1

If you're going to be dismissive about the problem, make some effort to educate yourself first.

http://www.bu.edu/cste/

TRH
05-03-2012, 08:35 AM
...but the fact remains

It didn't even make it until it was dark out the day he commits suicide........and the groups pushing their "concussions" agenda's were already coming out of the woodwork. And oh yeah : they are attempting to extort tens, hundreds of millions of dollars from the NFL in coming future lawsuits. More attorneys are going to get rich because we all know what out-of-control juries and activists judges do nowadays.

Sad for his family, but if its a regular civilian that commits suicide, its called a shameful act. But because its a sports figure, the accolades and excuses are just pouring in right now. Its the society we live in.

I'm neutral as far as the guy goes, but listening to many of the news stories on TV and blogs so far is enough to make one sick. Its not even 24 hrs after the fact and agendas are being thrown around and pushed and so forth.

Vis
05-03-2012, 08:48 AM
...but the fact remains

It didn't even make it until it was dark out the day he commits suicide........and the groups pushing their "concussions" agenda's were already coming out of the woodwork. And oh yeah : they are attempting to extort tens, hundreds of millions of dollars from the NFL in coming future lawsuits. More attorneys are going to get rich because we all know what out-of-control juries and activists judges do nowadays.

Sad for his family, but if its a regular civilian that commits suicide, its called a shameful act. But because its a sports figure, the accolades and excuses are just pouring in right now. Its the society we live in.

I'm neutral as far as the guy goes, but listening to many of the news stories on TV and blogs so far is enough to make one sick. Its not even 24 hrs after the fact and agendas are being thrown around and pushed and so forth.
Just about everything you posted is bullshit. There is no reason you should know anything about traumatic brain injuries. But you should recognize that you don't. The agenda is the search for knowledge. People are fond of saying that players know what they're getting into when they play. Players don't know. The understanding of the dangers is growing. Those searching for this greater understanding should not be shouted down for their efforts.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy was found in the autopsied brains of Mike Webster, Terry Long and Justin Strzelczyk, all Steelers. Don't you think they should look at Junior's brain?

ebsteelers
05-03-2012, 09:18 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/03/sports/football/03duerson.html?_r=1

If you're going to be dismissive about the problem, make some effort to educate yourself first.

http://www.bu.edu/cste/

good links you posted, would like to read up on this more..


curious, i never played football at the professional level
but played from age 5 up until i was 22 , obviously the hitting isnt as hard as at a professional level, but wonder the long term effects of playing for so long

TRH
05-03-2012, 11:16 AM
Just about everything you posted is bullshit. There is no reason you should know anything about traumatic brain injuries. But you should recognize that you don't. The agenda is the search for knowledge. People are fond of saying that players know what they're getting into when they play. Players don't know. The understanding of the dangers is growing. Those searching for this greater understanding should not be shouted down for their efforts.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy was found in the autopsied brains of Mike Webster, Terry Long and Justin Strzelczyk, all Steelers. Don't you think they should look at Junior's brain?


false. It wasn't even 4 in the afternoon and there were already people coming out pushing "brain injury fault"...... way, way before any facts of the suicide were even remotely available. You can't tell me money-hungry attorney's in their efforts to extract money from the NFL weren't already leaking stories.
No one said anything about there not being concussion-related injuries in the game or that they shouldn't "look at his brain".
Even so, unless there's a conclusive note left by him, no one will every know "why" his did it, other than be a troubled human being. Injury or no injury, we'll likely never know why.

Vis
05-03-2012, 11:41 AM
false. It wasn't even 4 in the afternoon and there were already people coming out pushing "brain injury fault"...... way, way before any facts of the suicide were even remotely available. You can't tell me money-hungry attorney's in their efforts to extract money from the NFL weren't already leaking stories.
No one said anything about there not being concussion-related injuries in the game or that they shouldn't "look at his brain".
Even so, unless there's a conclusive note left by him, no one will every know "why" his did it, other than be a troubled human being. Injury or no injury, we'll likely never know why.

It is impossible to make a decision independent of the realities of the brain's structure and chemicals. Junior's decision came from somewhere.

And money hungry attorneys (thanks for the right wing meme about my profession) can't get money unless the science says they're right. then they have to prove the league bears some responsibility.

DG94
05-03-2012, 12:28 PM
According to Adam Schefter, he was never listed on an injury report for concussion.

RIP

Vis
05-03-2012, 12:44 PM
According to Adam Schefter, he was never listed on an injury report for concussion.

RIP


Was Mike Webster? He missed 4 games in 16 years.

http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/doug_moe/article_0b0b394e-bf54-11de-b841-001cc4c002e0.html

Not long after he died, Mike Webster's brain wound up in a plastic tub that was sitting on a table in the living room of a Pittsburgh man named Bennet Omalu.

Omalu, a forensic pathologist originally from Nigeria, was obsessed with Webster's brain. When he couldn't work on it enough in his office at the Allegheny County coroner's office, he took it home.

What Omalu found then has the nation's attention now.

Mike Webster was one of the greatest football players of his generation, a center for the Wisconsin Badgers and then the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Born in Tomahawk, Webster was all-Big Ten with the Badgers and helped the Steelers win four Super Bowls during a pro career that landed him in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

But in the past week, both Webster's former wife, Pam Webster, and his son, Garrett Webster, told me separately that his greatness on the field will not be his true legacy. His real legacy involves what Bennet Omalu found while working in his living room back in 2002.

And although neither Pam nor Garrett said it, that aspect of Webster's legacy is assured in part because of how hard his family fought for justice for themselves and for Mike's memory after his death.

The subject of brain injuries in football has been in the spotlight in recent weeks, and Webster, who was 50 when he died in 2002, is again in the news.

He figures prominently in a riveting article, "Brain Game," in the October issue of GQ magazine. That piece, by Jeanne Marie Laskas, details how Omalu discovered and named a disease, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), that has been found in the brains of eight deceased former NFL players aged 36 to 52. Webster was the first.

Last Friday, Garrett Webster was interviewed on the ABC News program "Nightline" in a segment on football brain injuries that also included interviews with Omalu and Julian Bailes, a former Steelers team doctor who is now chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at West Virginia University.

That school is home to the Brain Injury Research Institute, where Garrett Webster, who is 25, now works as a liaison to NFL players and their families.

He's uniquely qualified for the position. In 2000, Garrett was living with his mom and siblings and attending Lodi High School as a freshman. But when the school year was over, Garrett moved to Pittsburgh, in large part to try to take care of his dad, who was separated from Pam.

"We all knew he was in a downward spiral," Garrett told me this week.

Back when Garrett had turned 10, Mike came home to Wisconsin to attend the party, but he never made it to Lodi. Instead, he was in the Budgetel Inn in Madison, too sick and disoriented to come out of his dark room.

In 1997, Mike had contacted a West Virginia attorney, Bob Fitzsimmons, who eventually sent Webster to four doctors, all of whom diagnosed brain injury due to multiple blows to the head. Yet the NFL fought paying Webster - and, after his death, his estate - what a football-related total disability should have yielded.

A court case went on for years. Finally, in December 2006, the U.S. Court of Appeals upheld a lower court ruling that football injuries permanently disabled Mike Webster, resulting in an award of around $1.5 million for Pam and her four kids.

Lately, there have been a few tentative signs that the NFL is ready to remove its head from the sand on this issue, even commissioning a study of its own.

"We're not a group that points fingers," Garrett told me. "That's not going to accomplish anything. I think the NFL is treading very carefully. We're trying to grow our relationship with the league. Our goal is not to ban football."

He thinks new equipment, perhaps better helmets, may be a part of the answer. The important thing right now is acknowledging a real issue exists, and no one who hears Mike Webster's story can doubt that.

"His legacy," Garrett said, "is going to be how he helped people when he passed away."

DG94
05-03-2012, 12:49 PM
Was Mike Webster?

I don't know. Then again during that era (and Seau's) a concussion was little more than 'getting your bell rung', so I doubt they would put it on.

Atlanta Dan
05-03-2012, 01:11 PM
It is impossible to make a decision independent of the realities of the brain's structure and chemicals. Junior's decision came from somewhere.

And money hungry attorneys (thanks for the right wing meme about my profession) can't get money unless the science says they're right. then they have to prove the league bears some responsibility.

Agree with TRH that while it could be CTE it could also be that Seau had a history of severe depression unrelated to CTE or for all we know might have financial problems or a severe drug habit (2 other not uncommon occurences among retired professional athletes) - if anyone tossed out that Seau's suicide could be due to drugs, money problems or untreated depression with no facts to back it up they justifiably would be blasted.

For the doctor i quoted to throw out speculation as to causation while admitting he did not have a clue about Seau's personal condition was extraordinarily
unprofessional unless the goal was to contend everytime a pro foootball player takes his own life it must be presumned to be CTE relatied unless proven definitively to the contrary.

NFL induced CTE is a major problem but the talking heads attributing a suicide to CTE with no proof to support it is not a proper means of advancing the goal of having CTE among pro football players being taken more seriously

Fire Arians
05-03-2012, 01:23 PM
i dont think he had any history of concussions. i would look at drug use though, i always thought the guy was on steroids or HGH because who the hell is able to play linebacker at age 40?

Vis
05-03-2012, 01:30 PM
Agree with TRH that while it could be CTE it could also be that Seau had a history of severe depression unrelated to CTE or for all we know might have financial problems or a severe drug habit (2 other not uncommon occurences among retired professional athletes) - if anyone tossed out that Seau's suicide could be due to drugs, money problems or untreated depression with no facts to back it up they justifiably would be blasted.

For the doctor i quoted to throw out speculation as to causation while admitting he did not have a clue about Seau's personal condition was extraordinarily
unprofessional unless the goal was to contend everytime a pro foootball player takes his own life it must be presumned to be CTE relatied unless proven definitively to the contrary.

NFL induced CTE is a major problem but the talking heads attributing a suicide to CTE with no proof to support it is not a proper means of advancing the goal of having CTE among pro football players being taken more seriously

No one has said that's what it was. But to say that's the first thing that needs to be ruled out is being responsible. To say it's untreated depression gets you nowhere. The cause of the depression is what matters. Especially if the cause is preventable.

Vis
05-03-2012, 01:32 PM
"As both a football fan and a researcher in this area, the news comes with great sadness first of all for such a great player. But I think we have to add him to the list of those that we worry about who could have effects of chronic, repetitive brain trauma," said Bailes, chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at the NorthShore University HealthSystem in Chicago.

Seau, 43, was found dead at his home in Oceanside, Calif., from a gunshot wound to the chest that was apparently self-inflicted, according to police. He played 20 seasons in the NFL with the San Diego Chargers, Miami Dolphins and the New England Patriots.

"We don't have any strong evidence (yet about Seau), and we know that people commit suicide for other reasons. … But to me it's also concerning due to the fact that he had such a long playing history," said Bailes.

"The emerging research is perhaps pointing to the amount of exposure to repetitive head contacts being like a dose response. … The more you're exposed to sun light; you get a higher chance of skin cancer. … The more CAT Scans you have; you are exposed to radiation and perhaps side effects."

Before he played in the NFL, Seau played at Southern Cal. Before that, he played at Oceanside High School.

"I think the risk may end up likely being on an exposure basis. … You're looking at someone who is approaching or at 30 years of exposure. '' said Bailes.

Dan, which quote in the article bothers you?

MACH1
05-03-2012, 01:35 PM
No one has said that's what it was. But to say that's the first thing that needs to be ruled out is being responsible. To say it's untreated depression gets you nowhere. The cause of the depression is what matters. Especially if the cause is preventable.

If it's hereditary depression the cause is not preventable. As long as we're throwing things out there. :noidea:

Vis
05-03-2012, 01:39 PM
If it's hereditary depression the cause is not preventable. As long as we're throwing things out there. :noidea:

Map his genome after the brain study. It's pricier.


Adolesc Med State Art Rev. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19492690#) 2009 Apr;20(1):41-56, viii.
Management of the adolescent concussion victim.

Congeni J (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=%22Congeni%20J%22%5BAuthor%5D).
Source

Division of Sports Medicine, Akron Children's Hospital Sports Medicine Center, 215 West Bowery Street, Suite 7300, Akron, OH 44308-1062, USA. jcongeni@chmca.org

Abstract

Increasing awareness and understanding of the implications of concussion have shaped a more proactive management approach to this problem. Although the incidence of brain injuries in adolescent athletes is probably in the range of 1.6 to 3.8 million per year (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Facts for physicians about mild traumatic brain injury. Available at: www.cdc.gov/ncipc/pubres/tbi_toolkit/physicians/mtbi/mtbi.pdf), difficulties in recognizing and diagnosing this condition mean that as many as 80% go unrecognized and have led to its being known as "the silent epidemic." Attempts to improve the evaluation on the sidelines, in the outpatient clinic, and in the home are helping to improve management. Better understanding of the prognosis and clinical course of concussion, as well as the importance of physical and mental rest, have also helped healthcare providers to make better decisions about allowing athletes to return to play.

Vis
05-03-2012, 01:41 PM
How common is CTE among former football players? Nobody knows. At the moment, CTE can only be diagnosed postmortem, after the cortex is dissected. However, there is disturbing evidence that CTE is occurring among players at rates many times higher than normal. For instance, a 2009 study commissioned by the NFL found that former players between the ages of 30 and 49 were being diagnosed with severe memory-related diseases at approximately nineteen times the rate of the general population.

http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/7443714/jonah-lehrer-concussions-adolescents-future-football

MACH1
05-03-2012, 01:41 PM
Map his genome after the brain study. It's pricier.



Or check his family medical history. Cheaper.

Vis
05-03-2012, 01:49 PM
Or check his family medical history. Cheaper.

They already denied it. Not that that means much but asking for access to his brain better than asking family members to release their mental health records. If the brain is clean then something else was involved. The drug issue should be cleared up in the normal autopsy.

MACH1
05-03-2012, 01:55 PM
They already denied it. Not that that means much but asking for access to his brain better than asking family members to release their mental health records. If the brain is clean then something else was involved. The drug issue should be cleared up in the normal autopsy.

Yeah, just because they denied doesn't mean it's not there. But I agree all the other stuff needs to checked.

Atlanta Dan
05-03-2012, 02:57 PM
Dan, which quote in the article bothers you?


"We don't have any strong evidence (yet about Seau), and we know that people commit suicide for other reasons."

That should end it - sportswriters and posters on fan sites speculate - someone who is being quoted as a medical professional should not be trotting out a potential proximate cause for suicide wth nothing to back it up beyond Seau having played football

I am not saying Seau's brain tissue should not be examined - what i am saying is this doctor is invested in investigating links between football and CTE and used a tragedy to speculate about tying CTE to Seau's suicide while having zero evidence of Seau's medical condition to support that causation - a doctor trading on a personal tragedy to get his concerns before the public is shamless

TRH
05-03-2012, 03:04 PM
Regular civllians commit suicide all the time....and we don't blame concussions. An athlete can have inner demons just like the rest of us can. They're not "holier than thou".

No one is saying that he might not have head trauma from his career. Even if he did, we'll likely NEVER know the cause. But the agenda-pushers were crawling out from under their rocks yesterday within a matter of hours. Thats what is making some people angry.
Atlanta Dan is correct.

Vis
05-03-2012, 03:12 PM
Regular civllians commit suicide all the time....and we don't blame concussions. An athlete can have inner demons just like the rest of us can. They're not "holier than thou".

No one is saying that he might not have head trauma from his career. Even if he did, we'll likely NEVER know the cause. But the agenda-pushers were crawling out from under their rocks yesterday within a matter of hours. Thats what is making some people angry.
Atlanta Dan is correct.

To find out if he had CTE they need the brain. How long can they wait to ask for it? Do you think it keeps? "Regular civilians" commit suicide and the cause goes unknown. That doesn't mean there isn't a cause. The agenda pusher in this case, the doctor who is requesting access, has the agenda of scientific discovery and player safety. Which one angers you?

ebsteelers
05-03-2012, 03:13 PM
is there a way to check for this CTE while alive?

Atlanta Dan
05-03-2012, 03:41 PM
is there a way to check for this CTE while alive?

The patient would be alive at the start of the procedure but not by the end

Additional speculation is that Seau shot himself in the chest rather than in the head to preserve his brain tissue to be examined. Dave Duerson also took his life without shooting himself in the head. Duerson's brain tissue was examined and he was found to have suffered from CTE,.

Atlanta Dan
05-03-2012, 03:51 PM
The agenda pusher in this case, the doctor who is requesting access, has the agenda of scientific discovery and player safety. Which one angers you?

I do not think anybody is against player safety and scientific discovery - it is using a personal tragedy to push an agenda (e.g. - people jumping on the Trayvon Martin tragedy with both feet to push an agenda before what actually occurred has been determined).

A medical professional who supports scientific discovery presumably should want to discover the facts before speculating on a diagnosis

Vis
05-03-2012, 05:46 PM
I do not think anybody is against player safety and scientific discovery - it is using a personal tragedy to push an agenda (e.g. - people jumping on the Trayvon Martin tragedy with both feet to push an agenda before what actually occurred has been determined).

A medical professional who supports scientific discovery presumably should want to discover the facts before speculating on a diagnosis

While at the same time making his case for access to the brain.

Vis
05-03-2012, 05:47 PM
The patient would be alive at the start of the procedure but not by the end

Additional speculation is that Seau shot himself in the chest rather than in the head to preserve his brain tissue to be examined. Dave Duerson also took his life without shooting himself in the head. Duerson's brain tissue was examined and he was found to have suffered from CTE,.

Maybe the girlfriend did it and the family is right that he was all sunshine and health.

TRH
05-03-2012, 06:04 PM
While at the same time making his case for access to the brain.


there is no way you, nor i, can get in his head and make that judgement. Thats pure speculation at best (and fueled like gasoline on a fire by the agenda-pushers). Tens of thousands of people have shot themselves through the heart.
I've read where people are actually trying to tell others what he was thinking. Thats BS. One of his ex-teammates i saw interviewed said it best.....that he would never let you think he was hurting in any way, he kept those things to himself.
Brain scans, no brain scans, whatever....no one will ever know what he was thinking or how depressed he may have been.

TRH
05-03-2012, 06:06 PM
To find out if he had CTE they need the brain. How long can they wait to ask for it? Do you think it keeps? "Regular civilians" commit suicide and the cause goes unknown. That doesn't mean there isn't a cause. The agenda pusher in this case, the doctor who is requesting access, has the agenda of scientific discovery and player safety. Which one angers you?


I hear what you're saying....but even if there is a brain injury of some sort...that doesn't mean its the absolute cause. He may just have been in a dark place....as so many others have been.

Vis
05-03-2012, 06:17 PM
there is no way you, nor i, can get in his head and make that judgement. Thats pure speculation at best (and fueled like gasoline on a fire by the agenda-pushers). Tens of thousands of people have shot themselves through the heart.
I've read where people are actually trying to tell others what he was thinking. Thats BS. One of his ex-teammates i saw interviewed said it best.....that he would never let you think he was hurting in any way, he kept those things to himself.
Brain scans, no brain scans, whatever....no one will ever know what he was thinking or how depressed he may have been.

Again, your knowledge of the science is lacking. If you had his brain cell for cell you would have shot yourself. There is no thought, no motivation, no decision outside of the reality of the electrochemical processes of the brain as possible within the physical structure remaining.

SteelersinCA
05-03-2012, 09:13 PM
Maybe the girlfriend did it and the family is right that he was all sunshine and health.

Except for that pesky driving his car off a cliff a couple years ago....

Hawaii 5-0
05-03-2012, 11:27 PM
Seau’s family considers donating brain for study

Posted by Mike Florio on May 3, 2012

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/is-seaus-death-part-of-a-bigger-issue-vi1dp6af-x-large.jpg?w=250

Researchers in Boston want to study the brain of the late Junior Seau for evidence of Chronic Traumatic Encephelopathy. Seau’s family may decide to allow it.

Pastor Shawn Mitchell told Reuters that Seau’s family is “considering” the request.

Frankly, it would be a surprise if Seau’s brain doesn’t show evidence of CTE. He played one of the game’s most violent positions for two full decades, repeatedly absorbing and delivering contact, often involving his helmet. For 19.5 of those seasons, the NFL used a much more lax approach to ensuring that players with concussions were held out of practice and games while exhibiting symptoms.

The fact that Seau never had any documented issues with concussions doesn’t mean he never suffered concussions. Former NFL linebacker Gary Plummer estimates that linebackers experience at least five low-grade concussions per game. “Junior played for 20 years,” Plummer told the San Jose Mercury News. “That’s five concussions a game, easily. How many in his career then? That’s over 1,500 concussions. I know that’s startling, but I know it’s true. I had over 1,000 in my 15 years. I felt the effects of it. I felt depression going on throughout my divorce. Junior went through it with his divorce.”

The broader question is whether the changes the NFL has made since 2009 will reduce head trauma and, in turn, reduce and/or eliminate CTE. For all players, the challenge is to find a way to give them the support they need once their careers end.

“There is no exit strategy from the NFL,” Plummer said. “It’s ‘You’re done.’ You don’t even get an apple and a road map. What needs to happen is mandatory counseling. In 15 years as a middle linebacker, I never would have thought of seeing a counselor. I saw one in my divorce, and I just called my counselor today. It can’t be optional, because macho players are taught to be invincible and they’re not going to do it. Make it mandatory.”

Plummer’s suggestion has plenty of merit. And if it keeps only one former player who is dealing with depression and migraines and the other effects of a life of football suddenly becoming a lifetime without it, it will have been worth the effort and the expense.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/05/03/seaus-family-considers-donating-brain-for-study/

tony hipchest
05-04-2012, 01:43 AM
i almost wanted to post this article because many of the younger fans may not realize all the pittsburgh (and steeler) connections to the nfl player brain injury research going on today. not only do we see evidence of how the browns suck when they draft, look no further than polamalu and ward being benched last season, while colt mccoy was sent back into a game with a concussion induced blackout that ended his season. then again you rarely hear about a steeler with staph infection, and the browns players seem to eat mursa for lunch.

anyways good piece-

http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/7888497/sources-forensic-pathologist-credited-identifying-cte-involved-junior-seau-autopsy?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

The forensic pathologist who first identified chronic brain damage as a factor in the deaths of some NFL players flew to San Diego on Thursday to participate in the autopsy of former All-Pro linebacker Junior Seau, two sources with knowledge of the case told ESPN.com.

The pathologist, Bennet Omalu, assisted in the autopsy conducted by the San Diego County medical examiner because of his experience with NFL players and brain injuries, the sources said.


Omalu's involvement, less than 24 hours after Seau died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest, may help determine whether the future Hall of Famer's suicide could be related to the growing link between football and concussions.


Omalu, the chief medical officer for San Joaquin County (Calif.), is credited with identifying Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a neurological disorder stemming from repeated head trauma in several deceased NFL players. CTE can lead to erratic behavior also associated with dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

It is expected to take 4-6 weeks to determine whether Seau suffered from CTE, and at this point, it is unclear who will make that diagnosis. Seau's brain remains with the San Diego medical examiner and is not expected to be buried with Seau, according to the sources.

Omalu and Julian Bailes, a renowned Chicago neurosurgeon and former Pittsburgh Steelers team physician, founded the Brain Injury Research Institute, which studies the impact of concussions. Their organization is seeking consent from Seau's family to conduct the studies necessary to determine whether the 12-time Pro Bowler had CTE.

Another research group, the Sports Legacy Institute at Boston University, also seeks access to Seau's brain, Sports Illustrated reported Thursday. SLI has received funding from the NFL. Chris Nowinski, a Harvard graduate and former professional wrestler who helped found the group, declined a request for an interview. Omalu and Bailes also declined comment.

Omalu, Bailes and Nowinski once worked together on the CTE issue but split over philosophical differences. The clash between the two groups over the acquisition of brains for CTE research, particularly in NFL players, is an ongoing issue and was documented in an ESPN article last year.

"It is our policy to not discuss any completed, ongoing or potential research cases unless at the specific request of family members," the Boston group said in a statement Thursday. "Our primary goal is to learn more about the long-term effects of repetitive brain trauma by conducting meaningful scientific research. At this time our thoughts and prayers are with Mr. Seau's family, his many friends and former teammates."

The issue of the NFL and brain damage began to emerge in 2002, when Omalu, then a pathologist in the Allegheny County (PA) coroner's office, conducted the autopsy on former Steelers center Mike Webster. The doctor discovered widespread brain trauma that appeared to be related to the player's 17-year career. Webster died of a heart attack at age 50, but his death was preceded by years of bizarre and erratic behavior.

Omalu's findings of "gridiron dementia" in players such as Webster, former Steeler Terry Long and former Philadelphia Eagle Andre Waters were initially dismissed by the NFL, which claimed there was no link between football and long-term brain damage. The league since has acknowledged a connection.

More than 1,500 players have sued the NFL, arguing for years the league hid the link between repeated concussions associated with football and brain damage. In the latest lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Atlanta, more than 100 players, including former Falcon running back Jamal Anderson, alleged the NFL "repeatedly refuted the connection between concussions and brain injury."

Vis
05-04-2012, 12:47 PM
Jim Trotter of SI.com reports that he spoke with the late Junior Seau in March about the perception that commissioner Roger Goodell was making the game too soft with his enhanced enforcement of player safety rules.

"It has to happen," he said. "Those who are saying the game is changing for the worse, well, they don't have a father who can't remember his name because of the game. I'm pretty sure if everybody had to wake with their dad not knowing his name, not knowing his kids' name, not being able to function at a normal rate after football, they would understand that the game needs to change. If it doesn't there are going to be more players, more great players, being affected by the things that we know of and aren't changing. That's not right."

Blackout
05-05-2012, 07:13 AM
Wait what's this about the curse of the Terrible Towel. Did Junior disgrace it?

silver & black
05-05-2012, 04:24 PM
http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/05/03/tim-brown-urges-caution-before-conclusions-on-junior-seau/

Hawaii 5-0
05-22-2012, 03:09 PM
May 22, 2012

Seau's suicide prompts worries about post-NFL life

By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Pro Football Writer

http://hosted.ap.org/photos/0/0e3c904b-f070-4a40-b7cb-9daa8c73a530-small.jpg

Junior Seau's suicide is troubling NFL players.

No one knows precisely why the 43-year-old Seau shot himself in the chest at his oceanfront home May 2, less than 2 1/2 years after the end of his Pro Bowl career as a linebacker. What is clear - and cause for concern among other players - is that he reached some serious depths of despair.

"To see a guy like that, in such a dark place, to take the action he did ... makes you think about life after football and what it's like, and what you'll be going through, when that time comes, mentally," said Colts linebacker A.J. Edds, who is entering his second NFL season. "This might have been what people needed to open their eyes a little bit about what might happen down the road. How do you go forward to prevent it? Hopefully some good can be found from a horrible situation. Hopefully that's one silver lining - that it might help other guys keep from getting to a place like that."

In 40 interviews with The Associated Press during the last two weeks, many players voiced growing worry about the physical and emotional toll professional football takes. Seau's suicide resonated among the 13 rookies, 17 active veterans and 10 retirees, with more than half of each group saying it pushed them to consider their future in the sport or the difficulties of adjusting to post-NFL life.

It's one thing to read about hundreds of guys they've never heard of suing the league because of neurological problems traced to a career long ago. It's quite another to find out about Seau, a charismatic, recent star for the Chargers, Dolphins and Patriots who played in the Super Bowl.

"The difference with Junior for many folks my age or younger is that I played against Junior a bunch. He was a peer. It's more impactful. Not to suggest I had a great friendship with Junior or knew him off the field. I didn't. It's simply closer to home for me than a guy who played in the `70s or `80s," said Pete Kendall, a starting offensive lineman from 1996-2008 for the Seahawks, Cardinals, Jets and Redskins. "All of those kinds of situations are horrible, but Junior's situation probably would have people re-examining things."

Indeed it did.

Even less-experienced NFL players in their mid-20s were forced to face some complicated questions in recent weeks.

"You can't avoid thinking about how the game might be affecting your future. Even something as small as forgetting where I put my keys. I know everyone does that from time to time, but am I forgetful because of football? Have I already done damage to my brain playing the game?" Packers tight end Tom Crabtree, who's played two seasons in the league, wrote in an email.

"When you see a guy we all assume to be so happy and successful take his own life, it's disturbing. I worry about how happy I am with life right now and wonder if the damage is too much to overcome. ... It's like these brain injuries really turn you into another person," Crabtree wrote. "It slowly chops away at your happiness. Nothing you can do about it."

He was one of a dozen players who, unprompted, mentioned brain disease or concussions in connection with Seau, even though there has been no evidence of either with the linebacker, who played from 1990 to 2009.

"The obvious questions arise: Was it depression? Brain damage? I've been reading a lot of different articles about it. I personally believe that concussions will definitely give you some sort of brain damage. Was that the cause? We won't know for sure until they examine his brain," former Chargers, Dolphins and Vikings receiver Greg Camarillo said. "But it definitely makes you think, as someone who has played this sport, about the damage that can be caused."

Explained rookie receiver Mohamed Sanu, chosen by the Bengals in the third round of April's draft: "You kind of wonder about your safety and your health and wonder if you'll be like that one day."

Players frequently mentioned that Seau's suicide prompted heartfelt conversations with spouses or close pals.

"As soon as something like that happens, you start calling all your friends to make sure they're OK, just checking on everybody," said Ken Norton Jr., who retired in 2000 after 13 seasons as a linebacker for the Cowboys and 49ers and now coaches that position with the Seahawks. "It just opens your eyes and makes you more aware of what each other is going through - and ask that extra question, give that extra hug, to make sure there aren't any problems we don't know about."

Matt Bowen, a former defensive back for the Redskins, Bills, Rams and Packers whose last season was 2006, got a telephone call from a college teammate the day Seau died.

"`I just want to tell you if you're ever down, you're ever depressed, just call me.' He was worried. ... My buddy from Iowa calling hit home a little bit," Bowen said. "A little doubt creeps into the back of my mind: Well, maybe this could happen to me."

In responding to the AP's questions, rookies were, to a man, certain the league is making things as safe as possible for them. They, of course, have yet to participate in their first training camp or game.

But players who've spent time in the NFL were split on whether they're properly equipped for what might await down the road. Asked whether the league is doing all it can to take care of players' financial, mental, physical and neurological health, particularly when it comes to having a good life in retirement, 13 veterans or retirees said yes, while 11 said no.

"There's a program for everything, but it can't prepare you for everything. Most people find out about the real world when they're 18 or 19. Ex-NFL players find out about it at 30 or 35," said 39-year-old Jon Kitna, a quarterback for the Seahawks, Bengals, Lions and Cowboys from 1997-2011.

"You might think you've got it bad in football, because it can be a grind and you might think meetings are a drag, but the real world gives you a totally different mindset," said Kitna, now teaching algebra and coaching football at the high school he attended in Tacoma, Wash. "There are a lot of programs available, but you have to search for the answers. That's harder for athletes, because they've been given answers their whole life."

Said Bowen: "I understand players who say, `They just throw you out the back door.' ... I would love to have guaranteed insurance. I think every NFL player would. It'd make life a lot easier. I'm 35, I have aches and pains. What am I going to be like at 45? I can't tell you that."

As for money matters, Steelers linebacker LaMarr Woodley, who's heading into his sixth season, said: "I wouldn't say the NFL takes care of players financially for the future. The NFL makes sure this is a drug-free league. You can't use steroids or street drugs; they're testing every week for that. But in terms of taking care of your finances, it's not something they push every week like they do with drugs. There's not a push that makes it mandatory for players to learn how to manage their money, or to set up life insurance or 401Ks."

The two men in charge of post-career programs at the NFL and the NFL Players Association readily admit there is room for improvement.

"Do I think enough is being done? A lot is being done. Can we do more? Yes," said NFL Vice President of Player Engagement Troy Vincent, a former defensive back in the league.

But he also put the onus on players for not participating in what's available.

"We can continue to expand our offerings, but if the athlete doesn't engage, it does no good," Vincent said. "What other employer provides this kind of service for their employee? It doesn't exist."

NFLPA Senior Director of Former Player Services Nolan Harrison said the union has been working for years to develop a new "life cycle program" to address various needs during careers in the NFL, from start to finish - and beyond.

Asked if there's a specific gap that can be improved, Harrison said: "Every area needs help."

"They need help with the identity of leaving the game: `You're no longer a football player.' They need help understanding they weren't ever `just a football player.' They were more than that. They weren't `just No. 74,'" said Harrison, who played defensive line. "We need them to understand they can take advantage of mental-care specialists while they're playing."

Only one veteran or former player the AP interviewed acknowledged having taken advantage of counseling provided by his team.

Three said they weren't aware such help exists.

"I could get a phone call and, in 30 seconds, my career's over. And where do you go from there? You're stuck. It's like, `What do I do next?' ... So you see a lot of players do fall into depression, gambling and partying and things like that to try to get over what happened," said Bills linebacker Kirk Morrison, who's entering his eighth season. "I think that's another time where players would seek help. But we're not built that way. ... We're not built to express our feelings."

Several players echoed Camarillo's observation that the biggest difficulty might very well be persuading players that there's nothing wrong with seeking help.

"It's a matter of a culture change, moreso than just creating a program. It needs to be something that's not looked down upon. If a player goes for counseling: `What's wrong with that guy? Why can't he deal with it?' The NFL and NFLPA can definitely help more, but it also needs to be a culture change," said Camarillo, who holds out hope of continuing his playing career.

"It's just the `tough guy' mentality," Camarillo said. "We're taught to deal with any type of weakness and fight through it. In the physical world, that works fine with a sprained ankle or something like that. But in the emotional world, it just doesn't work the same."

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/F/FBN_SEAU_FOOTBALLS_TOLL?SITE=PAPIT&SECTION=SPORTS&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

Atlanta Dan
06-01-2012, 09:31 AM
USA Today has a lengthy story on Junior Seau's last days


http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/story/2012-05-31/Junior-Seau-suicide-last-days-sleep-issues/55316506/1