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mesaSteeler
05-05-2012, 01:53 AM
Rolle prepared to make impact for Steelers
http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/1292918-85/rolle-steelers-football-safety-think-chance-coach-field-shape-titans

By the Tribune-Review

Published: Saturday, May 5, 2012, 12:30 a.m.
Updated 51 minutes ago

Myron Rolle has had conversations with Jesse Jackson and rubbed elbows with Bill Clinton during a humanitarian trip to the Republic of Congo last summer.

He graduated Florida State’s pre-med program in 2½ years with a 3.75 GPA; he has scrubbed in for surgeries as a shadow; was awarded a prestigious Rhodes Scholarship; and received a master’s degree from Oxford University in medical anthropology.

But that just scratches the surface for this 25-year-old.

Rolle has had his own foundation for three years, he’s in the process of obtaining funding to open a free health services clinic and sports complex in his parents’ native land of the Bahamas and plans on finishing his medical degree and becoming a philanthropic neurosurgeon.

But the one thing that the Steelers safety has yet to accomplish is what drives him the most – making an NFL roster.

That might change this year, as Rolle was on the field Friday at the team’s minicamp for the first time since he signed with the Steelers in January.

“I think I have a decent shot if I do what I have to do,” Rolle said. “If I meet the standard of what Coach (Mike) Tomlin and the Steelers’ organization requires, I think I can put myself in position to earn a spot.”

After skipping a year of football to study abroad, the most success the three-year starting safety at Florida State has seen since being a sixth-round pick of Tennessee in 2010 was a year on the Titans’ practice squad.

Rolle, who is cousins with Giants safety Antrel Rolle and former Ravens cornerback Samari Rolle, went through a second training camp with the Titans last year but was released during the final cut down.

“I appreciated Jeff Fisher and the Titans for giving me that chance,” Rolle said. “I definitely appreciate Coach Tomlin and the Steelers giving me a chance here.”

Rolle signed a futures deal with the Steelers in January and provides a breath of youth into a position quickly aging. Ryan Clark is 32, Troy Polamalu is 31, Will Allen is 29 and Ryan Mundy is 27.

Rolle could provide what Allen did for the team last year — backup at both safety positions while playing special teams at a saving of nearly $1 million.

Rolle believes he is back in football shape after being away from the game for a year. He believes that’s what hurt him in Tennessee.

“Being in Oxford, where the weather isn’t great and rugby is probably the most important sport there, it is hard to stay in shape and do the things you need to do to play in the NFL,” Rolle said.

Even with his unique educational background and aspirations of becoming a neurosurgeon, football is something that Rolle is completed dedicated to now.

“After football is done, I hope my hands are still in good shape and I don’t have many concussions, so I will be able to perform surgeries on operating tables and travel and learn different cultures,” Rolle said.

Possibly losing two careers with one freak accident on the football field isn’t something Rolle dwells on.

“I can’t think about it because that will slow me down and I wouldn’t be as good a player as I possibly could be,” Rolle said. “If you look at it rationally, sure I am taking a chance, but life is about taking chances. I am excited about my opportunity here.”

ZiggyHeyward
05-06-2012, 06:29 AM
I'm a big fan of his I hope he pans out for us. Couldn't ask for a better character guy and I think his head makes up for his below average foot speed. Although I'm sure he could take Ryan Clark in a foot race at this point in his career.

BengalDestroyer
05-06-2012, 08:03 AM
I'm a big fan too. Great character guy, I hope he beats out Will Allen and can contribute on special teams...

Hawaii 5-0
05-31-2012, 05:44 PM
Rolle hitting the books with Steelers

UPDATED MAY 31, 2012

PITTSBURGH (AP)
Myron Rolle and Troy Polamalu walked off the Pittsburgh Steelers practice field on Thursday, sweat dripping down their faces, jerseys drenched, arms moving animatedly as they talked.

Was Rolle, a free agent trying to resurrect his career, picking the All-Pro safety's brain about the finer points of Dick LeBeau's defense?

Not exactly.

''We were talking about the expansion of the middle class and how resources are running out,'' Rolle said. ''How everyone wants to have two cars and three TVs in their house. But how are we going to sustain that with 6.4 billion people on the earth and growing?''

Rolle wasn't kidding. He rarely does. His concerns are legitimate, his passion for the topic obvious, his curiosity palpable.

That thirst for knowledge is also one of the reasons why the 25-year-old finds himself in Pittsburgh trying to revive his flagging career instead of enjoying life as an NFL starter.

The athletic 6-foot-2, 215-pound Rolle appeared well on his way to the pros after being named a third-team All-American following his junior year at Florida State in 2008. His playmaking ability and impeccable instincts shot Rolle up NFL Draft boards.

Rolle, however, had other plans. Rather than enter the draft he opted to spend a year at Oxford University after being named a Rhodes Scholar. While former college teammates - including Pittsburgh linebacker Lawrence Timmons - lived it up in the NFL in 2009, Rolle worked on his thesis and earned a master's degree in medical anthropology.

He planned all along to return to football, working out in a tiny 10x10 weight room and running on a grass-barren rugby field while his classmates went to the pub.

Rolle returned to the U.S. with his degree and a fair amount of football rust. Shaking it off proved more problematic than he imagined.

The Tennessee Titans chose him in the sixth-round of the 2010 Draft. He made the team but never saw the field during the regular season and was released prior to the 2011 season.

It was the first time in Rolle's life success hadn't come easily, or immediately.

His frustration grew to a point where he wondered if choosing Oxford over the NFL was the right idea. Regret, however, was only fleeting.

''Once I thought about being a Rhodes Scholar and how that could behoove my future interests, and how it's placed me in a social station of life of being a role model for other young people to pursue academics and athletics at the highest level, I think it was a great choice,'' Rolle said.

Even if he understands that it left some in the NFL wondering if he was really committed to football. Unlike most players his age just trying to grab a roster spot, Rolle has seemingly limitless options outside the game.

He could go on to medical school to become a neurosurgeon. He could pour all of his energy into his eponymous foundation, which focuses on ''health, wellness, educational and other charitable initiatives throughout the world.'' Or he could continue his campaign against obesity and diabetes, particularly in Native American culture.

Rolle will get to those things eventually. Just not now. If anything, he believes his decision to pursue an NFL career only proves how badly he wants to succeed.

''Despite having the option to do B, C and D I still want A,'' he said. ''I still want to be here even though I'm on the bottom.''

And Rolle certainly knows he's on the bottom. The Steelers already have two established veterans in Polamalu and Ryan Clark and quickly improving Ryan Mundy as the top backup. Chances of Rolle beating out Mundy appear to be slim, meaning he'll be fighting with a handful of other free agent safeties for one roster spot.

There was a period when Rolle would spend hours running over every practice in his mind, trying to read the tea leaves. It was exhausting.

''I'd see who's there, how many reps I'm getting,'' he said. ''That was so time consuming and just expending a lot of intellectual energy that I could have used to learn the playbooks, make calls on the field and different things of that nature.''

This time he's just trying to let it go. Rolle believes the rust he struggled with after returning from England is finally gone. He leans heavily on Polamalu and Clark for advice and despite his academic pedigree he doesn't feel like an outcast.

He worried about not being on the same ''wavelength'' with his teammates while playing for the Titans. It never happened. In a way, they took ownership of his success.

''They respected me and the journey that I've taken and they're proud of me,'' Rolle said. ''They feel like they've gone on the journey themselves being young African-American athletes. I feel proud to carry the mantle so to speak and serve as a representation for what a true student-athlete should be.''

Rolle's focus at the moment is on the athlete part of the equation. The student part with always be there.

http://network.yardbarker.com/nfl/article_external/rolle_hitting_the_books_with_steelers/10913291

austinfrench76
06-01-2012, 01:40 PM
I would love to see this kid make it over Will Allen. Youth and cheap!

OX1947
06-01-2012, 02:07 PM
Rolle hitting the books with Steelers

UPDATED MAY 31, 2012

PITTSBURGH (AP)
Myron Rolle and Troy Polamalu walked off the Pittsburgh Steelers practice field on Thursday, sweat dripping down their faces, jerseys drenched, arms moving animatedly as they talked.

Was Rolle, a free agent trying to resurrect his career, picking the All-Pro safety's brain about the finer points of Dick LeBeau's defense?

Not exactly.

''We were talking about the expansion of the middle class and how resources are running out,'' Rolle said. ''How everyone wants to have two cars and three TVs in their house. But how are we going to sustain that with 6.4 billion people on the earth and growing?''

Rolle wasn't kidding. He rarely does. His concerns are legitimate, his passion for the topic obvious, his curiosity palpable.

That thirst for knowledge is also one of the reasons why the 25-year-old finds himself in Pittsburgh trying to revive his flagging career instead of enjoying life as an NFL starter.

The athletic 6-foot-2, 215-pound Rolle appeared well on his way to the pros after being named a third-team All-American following his junior year at Florida State in 2008. His playmaking ability and impeccable instincts shot Rolle up NFL Draft boards.

Rolle, however, had other plans. Rather than enter the draft he opted to spend a year at Oxford University after being named a Rhodes Scholar. While former college teammates - including Pittsburgh linebacker Lawrence Timmons - lived it up in the NFL in 2009, Rolle worked on his thesis and earned a master's degree in medical anthropology.

He planned all along to return to football, working out in a tiny 10x10 weight room and running on a grass-barren rugby field while his classmates went to the pub.

Rolle returned to the U.S. with his degree and a fair amount of football rust. Shaking it off proved more problematic than he imagined.

The Tennessee Titans chose him in the sixth-round of the 2010 Draft. He made the team but never saw the field during the regular season and was released prior to the 2011 season.

It was the first time in Rolle's life success hadn't come easily, or immediately.

His frustration grew to a point where he wondered if choosing Oxford over the NFL was the right idea. Regret, however, was only fleeting.

''Once I thought about being a Rhodes Scholar and how that could behoove my future interests, and how it's placed me in a social station of life of being a role model for other young people to pursue academics and athletics at the highest level, I think it was a great choice,'' Rolle said.

Even if he understands that it left some in the NFL wondering if he was really committed to football. Unlike most players his age just trying to grab a roster spot, Rolle has seemingly limitless options outside the game.

He could go on to medical school to become a neurosurgeon. He could pour all of his energy into his eponymous foundation, which focuses on ''health, wellness, educational and other charitable initiatives throughout the world.'' Or he could continue his campaign against obesity and diabetes, particularly in Native American culture.

Rolle will get to those things eventually. Just not now. If anything, he believes his decision to pursue an NFL career only proves how badly he wants to succeed.

''Despite having the option to do B, C and D I still want A,'' he said. ''I still want to be here even though I'm on the bottom.''

And Rolle certainly knows he's on the bottom. The Steelers already have two established veterans in Polamalu and Ryan Clark and quickly improving Ryan Mundy as the top backup. Chances of Rolle beating out Mundy appear to be slim, meaning he'll be fighting with a handful of other free agent safeties for one roster spot.

There was a period when Rolle would spend hours running over every practice in his mind, trying to read the tea leaves. It was exhausting.

''I'd see who's there, how many reps I'm getting,'' he said. ''That was so time consuming and just expending a lot of intellectual energy that I could have used to learn the playbooks, make calls on the field and different things of that nature.''

This time he's just trying to let it go. Rolle believes the rust he struggled with after returning from England is finally gone. He leans heavily on Polamalu and Clark for advice and despite his academic pedigree he doesn't feel like an outcast.

He worried about not being on the same ''wavelength'' with his teammates while playing for the Titans. It never happened. In a way, they took ownership of his success.

''They respected me and the journey that I've taken and they're proud of me,'' Rolle said. ''They feel like they've gone on the journey themselves being young African-American athletes. I feel proud to carry the mantle so to speak and serve as a representation for what a true student-athlete should be.''

Rolle's focus at the moment is on the athlete part of the equation. The student part with always be there.

http://network.yardbarker.com/nfl/article_external/rolle_hitting_the_books_with_steelers/10913291

Resources are not running out. There are almost 7 billion in the world, however, America only has a little over 300 million people. It's India and China that has a population and disgusting existence. Countries like that that kill their wives if their families don't pay for them or kill their daughters because they don't have a dick.

It is simple to solve our problems in America. STOP Buying shit you don't have money for. YAh, that means stop using credit cards to buy that extra tv or car. If you do that, all these banks and crooks wouldnt have a pot to piss in. When you do not owe and own everything, you have true freedom. And it doesnt matter which clown is in the white house either...

tony hipchest
06-01-2012, 02:27 PM
Resources are not running out. There are almost 7 billion in the world, however, America only has a little over 300 million people. It's India and China that has a population and disgusting existence. Countries like that that kill their wives if their families don't pay for them or kill their daughters because they don't have a dick.

It is simple to solve our problems in America. STOP Buying shit you don't have money for. YAh, that means stop using credit cards to buy that extra tv or car. If you do that, all these banks and crooks wouldnt have a pot to piss in. When you do not owe and own everything, you have true freedom. And it doesnt matter which clown is in the white house either...this address to an off topic blurb in a football article would be a great topic of discussion in the locker room.

in the meantime we will just pretend this attempted hijacking of a thread never happened. :smile:

OX1947
06-01-2012, 02:30 PM
this address to an off topic blurb in a football article would be a great topic of discussion in the locker room.

in the meantime we will just pretend this attempted hijacking of a thread never happened. :smile:

locker room? You're not gonna make me shower and shit are you?

tony hipchest
06-01-2012, 02:32 PM
locker room? You're not gonna make me shower and shit are you?no, not at all. we prefer it dirty in there. it IS co-ed

OX1947
06-01-2012, 02:40 PM
no, not at all. we prefer it dirty in there. it IS co-ed

Niiiiiice.

Hawaii 5-0
06-02-2012, 02:30 PM
Breaking down the defensive backfield for the 2012 Pittsburgh Steelers roster

Submitted by Syndicated sources on June 2, 2012
Brought to you by: Sports Media 101

The Pittsburgh Steelers ended another week of OTA sessions, which means that fans are one week closer to the start of training camp and the regular season. While, it is virtually impossible to make heads or tails of defensive progress due to the lack of hitting, it is always fun to see how explosive young players look in helmets and shorts. One area that the Steelers have some young athleticism is in their secondary, where they have a solid mixture of veterans and youth. In looking at the potential roster for the 2012 season, the majority of the secondary spots are spoken for.

The entire league knows about the starting safety tandem of free safety Ryan Clark and strong safety Troy Polamalu. Clark, who is coming off his best season as a Steeler (2011 Pro Bowl), will be chomping at the bit to get going after missing the playoff loss (and potentially the season opener) due to his sickle cell trait. He is the quarterback of the secondary and has an innate ability to know where Polamalu is at all times. Polamalu, a future Hall of Famer, surprised many by arriving in Pittsburgh to take part in the OTA process and it taking on a more visible leadership role in 2012.

Behind Clark and Polamalu are safeties Ryan Mundy and Will Allen. At this point it appears that Mundy is the top back up at both positions starting ball games in place of Clark and seeing action in specialty packages. Allen was brought in to add depth, but is primarily a veteran special team performer. Both should stay on in 2012.

At cornerback, one side is solidified with Ike Taylor, who had one of his best seasons as a Steeler in 2011 (until the playoff game). He is a physical presence¸ who is not afraid to take on the opposition’s number one wide receiver. On the other side, Veteran Keenan Lewis should get the first crack to replace the departed William Gay (Arizona). Lewis made huge strides in 2011 and solidified the corner position in nickel situations. Battling Lewis for the starting position will be a pair of second year cornerbacks in Cortez Allen and Curtis Brown. While both finished 2011 injured they both showed tremendous athletic ability and flashes during the season.

The Steelers have usually carried 10 defensive backs on the active roster, and two positions remain if that is again the case in 2012. While it is impossible to predict how players will perform in pads, it should be an interesting battle for these spots once training camp opens. One player that may have a leg up early in the process is rookie seventh round selection Terrence Frederick from Texas A&M. Yes, he is not the most physically gifted cornerback on the roster, he has the look of a short-area slot cornerback in the mold of Gay (who had a similar scouting report when leaving college). If Frederick holds serve, that will leave one roster spot up for grabs, and to fill it we roll the dice with safety Myron Rolle. A former Rhodes Scholar from Florida State, Rolle is a smart and motivated player who could definitely earn a spot as a special teamer.

http://network.yardbarker.com/nfl/article_external/breaking_down_the_defensive_backfield_for_the_2012 _pittsburgh_steelers_roster/10924775

ETL
06-02-2012, 08:08 PM
This guy is a little too much in love with himself.

To say that he wants to be a Neurosurgeon before even going to med school tells he that he is a bag of ego. So many people go to med school and end up being a specialist that they never even dreamed that they would do.

He could take a big helping of humble pie in my opinion. Also, his first grade as a neurosurgeon wannabe is a big fat F. Doesn't he know that playing football and the risk of concussions and brain damage is the worst thing he can do.

Twentyvalve
06-02-2012, 08:58 PM
Noting wrong with setting goals. Beats just saying "I just want to get to medical school and do, ah, well, whatever. Napoleon set goals, Gill Gates set goals, the Great Douglas McArthur stated " I will return." And don't forget our beloved Steelers - their ultimate goal. If they just show up to "play" and not finish as NFL champions then why bother?

Goals are very important in life. I don't know the guy, but it seems by all accounts he is humble and has the smarts to be neurosurgeon. What percentage of the population are Rhodes Scholars? Or surgeons for that matter? It seems to me he is one of the brightest among the brightest.

Did the US set a goal when after the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? :chuckle:

This guy is a little too much in love with himself.

To say that he wants to be a Neurosurgeon before even going to med school tells he that he is a bag of ego. So many people go to med school and end up being a specialist that they never even dreamed that they would do.

He could take a big helping of humble pie in my opinion. Also, his first grade as a neurosurgeon wannabe is a big fat F. Doesn't he know that playing football and the risk of concussions and brain damage is the worst thing he can do.

FrancoLambert
06-02-2012, 09:24 PM
This guy is a little too much in love with himself.

To say that he wants to be a Neurosurgeon before even going to med school tells he that he is a bag of ego. So many people go to med school and end up being a specialist that they never even dreamed that they would do.

He could take a big helping of humble pie in my opinion. Also, his first grade as a neurosurgeon wannabe is a big fat F. Doesn't he know that playing football and the risk of concussions and brain damage is the worst thing he can do.

You're way off here when you connect setting a career goal and being overloaded with ego. One has nothing to do with the other. As for aspiring to be a neurosurgeon before attending med school......well, that's one of the ways it can happen. Sure, some MD's change their mind about specialization during their studies but having a set goal and sticking to it is not as unusual as you suggest and doesn't indicate a massive ego.
Also, most of what I've read and heard about this kid has been positive.
Where's his negative press?

ETL
06-03-2012, 01:23 AM
You're way off here when you connect setting a career goal and being overloaded with ego. One has nothing to do with the other. As for aspiring to be a neurosurgeon before attending med school......well, that's one of the ways it can happen. Sure, some MD's change their mind about specialization during their studies but having a set goal and sticking to it is not as unusual as you suggest and doesn't indicate a massive ego.
Also, most of what I've read and heard about this kid has been positive.
Where's his negative press?

This kids knows nothing about neurosurgery. All he knows is that euphemistically, people equate neurosurgeons to rocket scientists, both of which are synonyms for geniuses. He thinks he's a genius and to "settle" for any other specialty would be a personal insult to him after all the people around him have stroked his ego and told him that he should be a neurosurgeon. I don't mind a person setting goals and I can already tell that he's a hard worker to have come this far academically.

But to openly declare that he wants to be a neurosurgeon at this stage tells me that he is enamored with all the side benefits that come with being a brain surgeon. Sort of like a teenager wanting to be a CEO ... Sure It means lots of money, prestige, power but does he really know what the actual day in day out job is?

I want him to do well as a football player, but I can use less of the "look how smart I am talk" and just want to see if he can make a play out there.

Merchant
06-03-2012, 04:36 PM
Don't think he'll make the cut. But I do like the kid. I'm rooting for him.

Twentyvalve
06-03-2012, 05:12 PM
I don't get it. I would think that most, if not all of the current neurosurgeons set their goal to specialize in neurosurgery. If asked, before each went to medical school, my instinct is that they would have stated they wanted that specialization. One does not stumble into neurosurgery.

And, I bet very few of the have been Rhodes Scholars. This guy is unique. The only difference is regular Joes like you and me hear and read he wants to be a neurosurgeon. So, we nay-say. What if you were his best friend? And he did not posses the talent to potentially compete in the NFL? And he had the same smarts and career goals? You say differently I would think.

This guy is special.He is focused, talented, and abnormally intelligent. If he sets his mind to doing it, I think he can.

We are having a neurosurgery discussion on an NFL forum - how is that for odd!

This kids knows nothing about neurosurgery. All he knows is that euphemistically, people equate neurosurgeons to rocket scientists, both of which are synonyms for geniuses. He thinks he's a genius and to "settle" for any other specialty would be a personal insult to him after all the people around him have stroked his ego and told him that he should be a neurosurgeon. I don't mind a person setting goals and I can already tell that he's a hard worker to have come this far academically.

But to openly declare that he wants to be a neurosurgeon at this stage tells me that he is enamored with all the side benefits that come with being a brain surgeon. Sort of like a teenager wanting to be a CEO ... Sure It means lots of money, prestige, power but does he really know what the actual day in day out job is?

I want him to do well as a football player, but I can use less of the "look how smart I am talk" and just want to see if he can make a play out there.

TheVet
06-04-2012, 01:35 AM
I have a goal to be a neurosurgeon without med school, which is very expensive. Self-taught neurosurgery, that's my goal.

Hawaii 5-0
06-04-2012, 01:58 AM
SS Troy Polamalu and Myron Rolle Go Above Normal Football Conversation

by Neal Coolong on Jun 3, 2012

http://cdn0.sbnation.com/entry_photo_images/4223426/130151608_extra_large.jpg

When we ran off the football field at the end of a practice, the topics of conversation ranged from things I cannot print on a family-friendly site to any and all possible situations in which we could make fun of other people.

When Steelers safety-in-training Myron Rolle walked off the field with SS Troy Polamalu, their conversation, apparently, goes a bit differently than the ones me and the other morons with whom I played.

According to Florida Today, Rolle engaged Polamalu in something a bit deeper than his role in the Steelers' dime package.

"We were talking about the expansion of the middle class and how resources are running out," Rolle said. "How everyone wants to have two cars and three TVs in their house. But how are we going to sustain that with 6.4 billion people on the earth and growing?"

What's expanding, though, is Rolle's understanding of the game. He admits to building up some rust in his time away from the game, when he was attending Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholarship winner. Two seasons with the Tennessee Titans, after being a sixth-round draft pick in 2010, helped him work some of that out and is ready to compete for what will likely be only one open safety position.

With Polamalu and FS Ryan Clark firmly entrenched in the starting spots with Ryan Mundy serving as back-up to both, as well as a talented crop of cornerbacks at minimum filling the maximum amount of roster spots given to the position, Rolle will battle veteran Will Allen and incumbent roster-fringer Damon Cromartie-Smith, as well as UDFA Robert Golden.

The Steelers must feel good about the position, considering they haven't drafted anyone there recently. Maybe they feel this is the year Cromartie-Smith locks himself in, or perhaps they'll be the benefactors of Rolle's outside-looking-in position over the last two seasons.

It's an important position, and definitely one to watch come training camp.

http://www.behindthesteelcurtain.com/2012/6/3/3058940/pittsburgh-steelers-troy-polamalu-myron-rolle-mentor-rhodes-scholarship-ryan-clark

Twentyvalve
06-04-2012, 01:53 PM
Good luck! Send me you card, I will give a you a call if I need you ! :chuckle:

I have a goal to be a neurosurgeon without med school, which is very expensive. Self-taught neurosurgery, that's my goal.

Fire Arians
06-04-2012, 02:16 PM
This guy is a little too much in love with himself.

To say that he wants to be a Neurosurgeon before even going to med school tells he that he is a bag of ego. So many people go to med school and end up being a specialist that they never even dreamed that they would do.

He could take a big helping of humble pie in my opinion. Also, his first grade as a neurosurgeon wannabe is a big fat F. Doesn't he know that playing football and the risk of concussions and brain damage is the worst thing he can do.

what is he supposed to say?

"Hi my name is Rolle and I'm a loser, I'm going to be a practice squad player at best in the NFL and probably be panhandling in 2 years"?

Bayz101
06-04-2012, 02:38 PM
I'm not under the assumption that he's in love with himself, rather that he's setting high standards. It's a good thing. He believes in himself.

I like the kid, he's bright.

tony hipchest
06-04-2012, 02:45 PM
so now wanting to be neurosurgeon is a character flaw?

unbelievable. :doh:

El-Gonzo Jackson
06-04-2012, 02:48 PM
I don't get it. I would think that most, if not all of the current neurosurgeons set their goal to specialize in neurosurgery. If asked, before each went to medical school, my instinct is that they would have stated they wanted that specialization. One does not stumble into neurosurgery.

And, I bet very few of the have been Rhodes Scholars. This guy is unique. The only difference is regular Joes like you and me hear and read he wants to be a neurosurgeon. So, we nay-say. What if you were his best friend? And he did not posses the talent to potentially compete in the NFL? And he had the same smarts and career goals? You say differently I would think.

This guy is special.He is focused, talented, and abnormally intelligent. If he sets his mind to doing it, I think he can.

We are having a neurosurgery discussion on an NFL forum - how is that for odd!

What a lot on here don't get is that if the kid wants to be a Neurosurgeon, he can do it and its better to know early in life than later. He can then plan to work hard on his studies and focus his time and attention on that specific career path.

I deal with Doctors almost daily and they are just people like anybody else. The toughest part of becoming a specialist is the length of the journey they must endure from getting into med school, school itself, then residency, fellowship and all the associated costs and time sacrifices that come with that.

As a football player, I think Rolle is a long shot to make the Steelers. As a Neurosurgeon, I think he will put in the time and become one

Fire Arians
06-04-2012, 02:52 PM
What a lot on here don't get is that if the kid wants to be a Neurosurgeon, he can do it and its better to know early in life than later. He can then plan to work hard on his studies and focus his time and attention on that specific career path.

I deal with Doctors almost daily and they are just people like anybody else. The toughest part of becoming a specialist is the length of the journey they must endure from getting into med school, school itself, then residency, fellowship and all the associated costs and time sacrifices that come with that.

As a football player, I think Rolle is a long shot to make the Steelers. As a Neurosurgeon, I think he will put in the time and become one

Well, if playing football is a passion in his life, it would be a shame if he didn't at least try to get there. If he wants to be a player in the NFL, he only has a limited amount of time before he's considered to be 'too old'.

And if he is a player, and retires at say, 35, he still has plenty of time to pursue an education. I think he's doing the right thing.

Hawaii 5-0
06-25-2012, 06:11 PM
Rolle a unique study for Steelers

June 24, 2012
Teresa Varley - Steelers.com

It’s not often a football player wants to spend an afternoon with a neurosurgeon, as it usually implies having baseline concussion tests or something similarly uncomfortable.

But Myron Rolle isn’t your average football player. So when he spent a recent afternoon shadowing Steelers neurosurgeon Joseph Maroon, it came as no surprise.

“We saw about 20 patients,” said Rolle. “I have shadowed doctors before, but he is a very special doctor.”

Rolle is pretty special himself. The saying, a ‘gentleman and a scholar’ applies for the Steelers safety who was signed this offseason.

When football is over, he wants to pursue a career as a philanthropic neurosurgeon, travelling around the world to help those who need it the most, particularly in underdeveloped nations.

“When I was in sixth grade I read a book called ‘Gifted Hands: The Ben Carson Story,’” said Rolle. “That inspired me to go into that field.”

He graduated from Florida State in a mere two and a half years, managing to balance school and football, without allowing either to suffer.

“It was about prioritizing and making sure I knew what was important,” said Rolle. “My parents always stressed the importance of academics and I did that since I was younger so that was routine for me. When I got to Florida State I knew I went there to earn my degree, set myself up as a future draft pick and make an impact in the community. Once I had that mindset and conceptualized that, it made putting the different items I had to do every day in order really easy.”

And if something was difficult, he still found a way to master it and turn it into something positive.

“The toughest class I had at Florida State was human biochemistry,” said Rolle. “It was so difficult I ended up doing research with the professor. We studied human mesenchymal stem cells and some cancer cells. I got a $6,000 grant to study those in the summer.

“The difficulty of the class attracted me to it. I had to go see a teacher for office hours to help. We developed a relationship and he brought the idea about doing the research and we picked it up from there.”

It was that ability to challenge and push himself to the limit and succeed that earned Rolle a Rhodes Scholarship, something awarded only to the best and the brightest.

Rolle had an interview for the Rhodes Scholarship on November, 22, 2008, the same day Florida State played at Maryland. Most people would choose one or the other. It’s no surprise Rolle not only choose both, but mastered both.

“It was remarkable, probably one of the best days of my life,” said Rolle, who used the Rhodes Scholarship to earn his master’s degree in medical anthropology from Oxford University. “I had a lot of support from Florida State, from the athletic department, making sure all I had to do was focus on the interview and show myself as a worthy candidate. Fortunately the result was in my favor as a Rhodes Scholar elect.

“After the interview I got on a private plane to head to Maryland for the game. And we won the game. It was two victories not only for me, but our university improving our academic image.”

While studying at Oxford was the perfect decision for Rolle for his medical future, it did delay his football future. He spent 2009 at Oxford not participating in athletics, missing football but having no regrets.

“Looking back at it, if I have any regrets it’s very short-lived and very transient,” said Rolle. “If you look at the big picture, I think I made the right decision for myself and my family, and for those that look at me as a role model for scholastics and athletics.”

Despite his accomplishments in the classroom, there is something Rolle still desires – to play in the NFL. Rolle was the Tennessee Titans sixth-round draft pick in 2010, spending a year on the practice squad, but was released by them prior to the 2011 season.

He signed a futures contact with the Steelers in January, and is now on the roster, just finishing up OTAs and mini-camp and preparing for training camp.

“I still have a love for the game,” said Rolle. “I still have athleticism in my corporal body to be able to contribute to a team. I am excited about this opportunity. Everything here is high tempo, high intensity. The coaches love the game. You get the feel that everybody loves it here. When I signed with Pittsburgh I had fans welcome me on Facebook and Twitter. It was overwhelming. To have that love and to give it back is something I want to do on the field, showing it every snap, 100 percent, doing everything I can.”

Rolle, 25, will be fighting to provide depth behind Troy Polamalu, Ryan Clark, Will Allen and Ryan Mundy.

“Every time I step on the field it’s an opportunity,” said Rolle. “Every time I take a snap it’s my chance to show the coaches and organization that I can contribute here and earn a spot. There is a level I want to reach. There is a level every man needs to reach here to be a Steeler and a part of this team and I am just looking forward to grinding it out every day to get here.

“Hands down this is the best I have felt. I am learning a new system and around some inspired and enthusiastic coaches who want to see the best out of all of us. I feel like I am in a good position right now. I think the Lord has placed challenges in my football career that have helped me be a better player. I think there is an old adage that says, ‘Rough seas make a better sailor.’ I think I have gone through some rough seas in my athletic career and I am primed and ready to make an impact and hopefully earn a spot on this team.”

http://www.steelers.com/news/article-1/Rolle-a-unique-study-for-Steelers/a4931b70-eddf-4b40-9126-5efbc5ed7797

Bayz101
06-25-2012, 06:14 PM
Nuerosurgen after playing football? Wow. Maybe it's just me, but that's particularly scary.

Edit: Not that I don't support it. I support him. He's a smart kid. Just hope he avoids any hard hits.

ETL
06-25-2012, 11:54 PM
After reading more articles on Rolle, I retract my criticism of Rolle ... with a caveat.

I stand by my original criticism of anyone who announces "I want to be a neurosurgeon" without any basis as someone that is enamored with the accolades that come with that specialty. I would have expected Rolle to say, "I would like to be a physician" or "I would like to be a surgeon" - reflecting their genuine nature to help people by becoming a healer and not necessarily identify the one specialty that is euphemistically equivalent to "genius." Former RB Robert Smith and famous neurosurgeon Ben Carson were people that first aspired to become "physicians."

However, after reading about Rolle, it seems that his dream of becoming a neurosurgeon comes from his admiration for Ben Carson. I can accept that as a legitimate basis. Its natural to want to become the same specialty as his hero. Fine.

I did not know about his admiration for Dr. Carson when I first posted. And without that basis, his statement, to me, as someone that went through this process, seems utterly egotistical.

I still question his judgment of wanting to play professional football and incur the risk of concussions and physical injury and still want to go into a specialty that requires fine motor skills and all the brain cells possible.