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MACH1
05-30-2012, 03:00 PM
One of the most popular yet polarizing local sports figures of the 1990's and early 2000's, Kordell Stewart returned to Pittsburgh today to "retire" as a Steeler, nearly a decade after he last played for the team.

A second round draft pick in 1995, Stewart played eight seasons in Pittsburgh. He rose to fame during his first two seasons when he saw game action as a wide receiver, a quarterback, a running back and even a punter, earning him the nickname "Slash."

He became the team's starting quarterback in 1997, leading the team to the AFC Championship. In 2001, he was the AFC Offensive Player of the Year, the team MVP and a Pro Bowl selection.

Stewart also was a target of rumors about his personal life and, according to him, death threats during seasons in which he struggled.

Of returning to Pittsburgh today for his "retirement," Stewart said: "It's not closure in a negative way, it's closure in a positive way ... I had a great time doing it. It's about the experience."

After leaving the Steelers, Stewart signed as a free-agent with Chicago in 2003 and played a season there before finishing his career with two seasons as a member of the Baltimore Ravens. He has since worked as an NFL analyst on ESPN. He resides in Atlanta with his wife and son. Former quarterback Mike Tomczak and tackle John Jackson also returned to "retire" as Steelers years after their playing careers ended.



http://old.post-gazette.com/pg/12151/1235606-66.stm#ixzz1wNZdyWJ0

Fire Arians
05-30-2012, 03:04 PM
good for him, despite all the hate he got, i can't deny that kordell was one of the more exciting quarterbacks to watch.

if only he was content in his 'slash' position, i feel he would have been a hall of famer. he was a monster as a rb/wr and situational qb

steeltheone
05-30-2012, 03:39 PM
Congrats Kordell!

steelerchad
05-30-2012, 03:45 PM
good for him, despite all the hate he got, i can't deny that kordell was one of the more exciting quarterbacks to watch.

if only he was content in his 'slash' position, i feel he would have been a hall of famer. he was a monster as a rb/wr and situational qb

agreed. His desire to be an every down QB was his demise. He was great in the slot with 3-5 or so plays a game from the QB position.

Hawaii 5-0
05-30-2012, 03:57 PM
WEDNESDAY, 30 MAY 2012

WRITTEN BY ED BOUCHETTE

http://plus.sites.post-gazette.com/images/stories/D_Gigler/kordell-stewart.jpg

Onto some stuff:

--- Kordell Stewart will attend Steelers practice today and I'm told will have some kind of announcement. Here's a guess: He will "retire a Steeler.'' With all due respect to these guys who do this, it's a little hokey.

Years ago Mike Tomczak asked the Steelers if they would sign him to a one-day contract so he could "retire a Steeler.'' The Steelers declined, but offered him the press room at St. Vincent College during training camp to announce he would "retire a Steeler.'' Colbert told me that to sign him to a one-day contract would mess up their salary cap. He did not laugh when he said that.

Others around the league have done this as well and some actually did sign a one-day contract. The only other Steelers player I can remember making such an announcement at the team's facility was former tackle John Jackson years ago. He did not sign a one-day contract and neither, I suspect, will Stewart.

Stewart did not leave the Steelers voluntarily. He was basically shown the door. I thought he was treated shabbily by the former coaching staff at the height of his effectiveness, getting benched a few games into the 2002 season – his last here -- after he made the Pro Bowl in 2001 and was voted the team's MVP.

Stewart was and is a good person who did not deserve the sometimes vile treatment he received from some fans while he was playing for the Steelers. I have no idea why he now wants to "retire a Steeler,'' if my guess is correct. He will always be considered a Steeler because that is where he made his mark in the NFL, helping the team to an AFC championship game at home in 1997 and some good quarterback play, even if others do not want to remember that.

For a time, he was one of the most exciting players in their history.

http://plus.sites.post-gazette.com/index.php/pro-sports/steelers/116552-ed-kordell-stewart-returns-to-steelers

ETL
05-30-2012, 04:32 PM
What?!?!?

He has a ... son ... and a wife?!?!?

tanda10506
05-30-2012, 04:51 PM
agreed. His desire to be an every down QB was his demise. He was great in the slot with 3-5 or so plays a game from the QB position.

That may be true but you can't blame him. They put him at QB and he was determined to be succesful at that position, he just didn't have the capability. He wasn't a great QB but he did well a couple of seasons.

Hawaii 5-0
05-30-2012, 04:51 PM
What?!?!?

He has a ... son ... and a wife?!?!?


so does John Travolta...

ETL
05-30-2012, 06:22 PM
so does John Travolta...

Touche

truesteelerfan
05-30-2012, 06:39 PM
Still a fan of his time with us - just didn't seem to have thick enough skin IMO - Does this mean I can wear my Stewart jerseys again - and perhaps more importantly - does anyone know how to simply and easily remove his name and I can have Troy Smith's Jersey

tanda10506
05-30-2012, 06:42 PM
so does John Travolta...

So is that true with Travolta then?

lardlad
05-30-2012, 07:20 PM
Congrats to Kordell. He had his moments, still feel l Ike he never reached his potential.

StainlessStill
05-30-2012, 08:14 PM
Kordell was and always will be one of my favorite Steelers and I say that proudly. He played in an era of where the Steelers truly were rebuilding and not reloading and he had to take on many tough tasks of coordinators and QB coach's, one after another that ultimately got him to play on a short leash.

With that said, congrats to him. This fan is happy he retired a Steelers!

zcoop
05-30-2012, 08:20 PM
Good for Kordell and his family. Congrats!

Lady Steel
05-31-2012, 12:28 AM
Congrats and best wishes, Kordell. :tt:

NoFieldFive
05-31-2012, 12:40 AM
was Kordell really the AFC offensive player of the year in 2001?

Fire Arians
05-31-2012, 12:45 AM
was Kordell really the AFC offensive player of the year in 2001?

his career for the most part was wildly inconsistent, but he did manage to put together a few really good seasons. he could just never string them together

Hawaii 5-0
05-31-2012, 12:50 AM
So is that true with Travolta then?


yes, it's definitely true. I have a good guy friend who used to work at the then Kauai Marriott who was propositioned by John Travolta when he stayed there years ago.

also, another friend of mine who is an actor in LA told me it's pretty common knowledge within the entertainment industry that John Travolta is into men...

grward
05-31-2012, 08:38 AM
That may be true but you can't blame him. They put him at QB and he was determined to be succesful at that position, he just didn't have the capability. He wasn't a great QB but he did well a couple of seasons.

Exacty ... THEY put him at QB. Isn't it the head coaches job to determine the players' roles? I don't blame Kordell for his lackluster playmaking at QB, I blame the coaches. Had they left him in the slash position, he would have had a hell of a career!

Congratulations Mr. Kordell!! It's always cool to know our organization is worth coming back to!

StainlessStill
05-31-2012, 08:51 AM
his career for the most part was wildly inconsistent, but he did manage to put together a few really good seasons. he could just never string them together


People say Kordell could of been an All-Pro if he stayed at wideout. I disagree. I believe he could have reached his full potential at QB but that time period kind of hurt his chances at full-time success.

He showed he had the goods in 1997 and had a SPECTACULAR first year starting under center, but he eventually lost to a VERY GOOD and dominating Broncos team in the AFC TITLE game (Stewart had a dominating game earlier in the season and beat Denver months earlier at home.)

The Steelers were straight up AWFUL in 1998-'99 and were truly rebuilding. This is when they put too much emphasis on changing Kordell's game to being a straight up pocket passer and bringing in new offensive coordinators and QB coach's to deny Stewart of his natural ability.

He again TORE IT UP and practically saved our season in 2000 from Kent Graham and missed the playoffs by one game. 2001 he was AFC offensive player of the year, made it to the Pro-Bowl and again had us on the cusp of the Super Bowl. That 2001 championship wasn't Kordell's fault. As I remember, we gave up 14 points on special teams and lost by 7 points, one who saw Kordell bring us within reach when Kordell orchestrated a nice drive and set up Amos to bring us within a touchdown.

2002 he was again on a short-leash and Tommy Gunn ended his career in Pittsburgh.

Stewart didn't have a chance to reach his full potential in Pittsburgh when it came to consistency but he did have great moments and deserves a ton more credit than he does from Steelers fans.

LVSteelersfan
05-31-2012, 12:22 PM
I thought Slash was great. Kordell the pocket passer sucked. But he was slightly better than Cliff Stoudt, Bubby Brister and Malone. Not saying much.

4xSBChamps
05-31-2012, 02:50 PM
good for him, despite all the hate he got, i can't deny that kordell was one of the more exciting quarterbacks to watch.

if only he was content in his 'slash' position, i feel he would have been a hall of famer. he was a monster as a rb/wr and situational qb

I always thought, and still believe, that Stewart was one-of, if not THE, most physically-gifted Steelers I have ever seen in the 44+ years I have watched them:
I enjoyed watching him play

Steeldude
05-31-2012, 03:24 PM
Ugh! I would have liked it if he retired as a Bear or Raven.

TheVet
05-31-2012, 04:14 PM
If Kordell had been willing to play receiver, he could have had quite a career - he might still be playing today. Unfortunately, he missed his true path.

steelax04
05-31-2012, 04:28 PM
Ugh! I would have liked it if he retired as a Bear or Raven.

I don't think he actually retired as a Steeler... was there any confirmation on that?

TheVet
05-31-2012, 04:47 PM
I don't think he actually retired as a Steeler... was there any confirmation on that?

Check out this thread for the confirmation: http://forums.steelersfever.com/showthread.php?t=89353. First post.

Hawaii 5-0
05-31-2012, 07:08 PM
posted by Dale Lolley

May 31, 2012

© Perhaps the most bizarre happenstance of the week was the "retirement" of former quarterback Kordell Stewart.

Considering the only time I'd seen Kordell the past few years was on pre-game shows and such, I thought he'd already hung up the helmet.

I know a lot of fans have a great deal of dislike for Stewart, but I always found him a decent guy.

He was a little full of himself in the beginning, but got knocked down a peg by the whole benching in favor of Kent Graham (!) thing.

He stayed strong and came back a better player and person from that ordeal - and the ridiculous and cowardly rumors about his sexual orientation.

I always admired him a little for that.

Was he a great quarterback? No. But he sure was fun to watch. If the coaching staff had used him a little better, he could have been much more impactful than what he was - and he was still impactful.

http://www.observer-reporter.com/or/sidelines/

Hawaii 5-0
06-01-2012, 03:36 AM
Cook: A curious choice, but for Stewart the right one

June 1, 2012
By Ron Cook / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Maybe Bill Romanowski had it right all of those years ago. It was late in the AFC championship game after the 1997 NFL season when Romanowski, a linebacker with the Denver Broncos, jumped in the face of Steelers quarterback Kordell Stewart after Stewart threw his third interception of the day. The Broncos were headed to Super Bowl XXXII, thanks to their 24-21 win at Three Rivers Stadium, and Romanowski felt the need to rub it in.

He mocked Stewart by tapping the side of his own helmet.

"I was just telling Kordell he isn't the smartest guy in the world," Romanowski said after the game.

It was a low-class move by a low-class player. Where was Jack Lambert when Stewart needed him? It would have been nice to see someone on the Steelers have Stewart's back and slam Romanowski down.

But maybe Romanowski was right.

Certainly, Stewart didn't show much intelligence this week when he came back to Pittsburgh to retire as a Steeler. It wasn't just bizarre. It was absurd. Stewart threw his last pass for the Steelers in 2002. He played in his last NFL game with the Baltimore Ravens in 2005.

And Stewart comes back now to announce his retirement?

Here?

How smart was that?

Stewart had to know people would look back on his career. He was one of this city's most vilified sports figures. It was so bad at times that it was embarrassing to the Steelers and to Steelers Nation.

The beer that was thrown on Stewart's head at Three Rivers Stadium. The racial slurs. The non-stop insults and innuendoes on the talk shows and the Internet. The death threats.

Many of those same people were back at it again this week, attacking Stewart anew.

Speaking of low class ...

A lot of Steelers fans should be ashamed of themselves.

Stewart did more for Pittsburgh than Pittsburgh ever did for him. He was the Steelers' best quarterback between four-time Super Bowl winner Terry Bradshaw and two-time Super Bowl winner Ben Roethlisberger.

He also is a much better man than his gutless, anonymous critics who came -- and are still coming -- after him personally. He never once lowered himself to fight back, never once got into a hissing contest with the snakes.

I admire Stewart more as a man than as a quarterback. And he was a pretty fair quarterback.

A lot of people forget Stewart led the Steelers to two AFC championship games. In several NFL cities, they would want to build a statue of the man. So many people talk only about the three interceptions he threw in that loss to the Broncos and the three others he threw in a 24-17 loss to the New England Patriots after the 2001 season. Too few fail to mention the many plays he made to get the team that far. He was a Pro Bowl player and the team's MVP when the Steelers went 13-3 in '01.

Stewart once predicted he would make the Hall of Fame. He fell considerably short, but he was better than everyone on this list: Cliff Stoudt, Mark Malone, David Woodley, Scott Campbell, Bubby Brister, Steve Bono, Todd Blackledge, Neil O'Donnell, Mike Tomczak, Jim Miller, Kent Graham and Tommy Maddox. They are the other Steelers quarterbacks who followed Bradshaw and preceded Roethlisberger.

Who knows how much better Stewart would have been with more stable coaching? It's not just that he played for five offensive coordinators during his eight seasons with the Steelers: Ron Erhardt, Chan Gailey, Ray Sherman, Kevin Gilbride and Mike Mularkey. None of the coaches seemed to know how best to use him. He was a multitalented quarterback long before the world heard of Tim Tebow. But he was about 10 times better than Tebow.

It's still hard to believe that Stewart was benched at various times for Tomczak, Maddox and, especially, Graham. He was benched pretty much for good in the third game of the 2002 season. Imagine that. Pro Bowl in '01. Benched early in '02. Released before the '03 season.

That's some fast fall.

It would have been nice if Stewart had taken a bit more blame after losses. That couldn't have hurt his popularity. Too often, he would say, "It's not just me out there." Of course, he was right, but no one wants to hear that from the quarterback. Roethlisberger gets it. He's always the first to say after every loss, "Put the blame on me." No one is going to question his intelligence.

But, as far as I can remember, Stewart never lashed out publicly about his treatment from the Steelers. He also never took on the alleged fans who made him the target of their hateful rumors about his personal life. He again dismissed all of it this week -- even the frightening death threats -- as a part of the "high expectations" that people have for all Steelers quarterbacks.

Stewart is a bigger man than me.

I would have said the hell with Pittsburgh.

I wouldn't have come back.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/sports/ron-cook/cook-a-curious-choice-but-for-stewart-the-right-one-638453/#ixzz1wW7dbc4B

steelax04
06-01-2012, 09:29 AM
Check out this thread for the confirmation: http://forums.steelersfever.com/showthread.php?t=89353. First post.

That's not confirmation... 5th post of the thread says that they refused a one day contract for others that requested it as was expected to be the case for Kordell.

It's all hokey warm and fuzzy stuff anyway, so in the end, it really doesn't matter.

StainlessStill
06-01-2012, 12:33 PM
Cook: A curious choice, but for Stewart the right one

June 1, 2012
By Ron Cook / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Maybe Bill Romanowski had it right all of those years ago. It was late in the AFC championship game after the 1997 NFL season when Romanowski, a linebacker with the Denver Broncos, jumped in the face of Steelers quarterback Kordell Stewart after Stewart threw his third interception of the day. The Broncos were headed to Super Bowl XXXII, thanks to their 24-21 win at Three Rivers Stadium, and Romanowski felt the need to rub it in.

He mocked Stewart by tapping the side of his own helmet.

"I was just telling Kordell he isn't the smartest guy in the world," Romanowski said after the game.

It was a low-class move by a low-class player. Where was Jack Lambert when Stewart needed him? It would have been nice to see someone on the Steelers have Stewart's back and slam Romanowski down.

But maybe Romanowski was right.

Certainly, Stewart didn't show much intelligence this week when he came back to Pittsburgh to retire as a Steeler. It wasn't just bizarre. It was absurd. Stewart threw his last pass for the Steelers in 2002. He played in his last NFL game with the Baltimore Ravens in 2005.

And Stewart comes back now to announce his retirement?

Here?

How smart was that?

Stewart had to know people would look back on his career. He was one of this city's most vilified sports figures. It was so bad at times that it was embarrassing to the Steelers and to Steelers Nation.

The beer that was thrown on Stewart's head at Three Rivers Stadium. The racial slurs. The non-stop insults and innuendoes on the talk shows and the Internet. The death threats.

Many of those same people were back at it again this week, attacking Stewart anew.

Speaking of low class ...

A lot of Steelers fans should be ashamed of themselves.

Stewart did more for Pittsburgh than Pittsburgh ever did for him. He was the Steelers' best quarterback between four-time Super Bowl winner Terry Bradshaw and two-time Super Bowl winner Ben Roethlisberger.

He also is a much better man than his gutless, anonymous critics who came -- and are still coming -- after him personally. He never once lowered himself to fight back, never once got into a hissing contest with the snakes.

I admire Stewart more as a man than as a quarterback. And he was a pretty fair quarterback.

A lot of people forget Stewart led the Steelers to two AFC championship games. In several NFL cities, they would want to build a statue of the man. So many people talk only about the three interceptions he threw in that loss to the Broncos and the three others he threw in a 24-17 loss to the New England Patriots after the 2001 season. Too few fail to mention the many plays he made to get the team that far. He was a Pro Bowl player and the team's MVP when the Steelers went 13-3 in '01.

Stewart once predicted he would make the Hall of Fame. He fell considerably short, but he was better than everyone on this list: Cliff Stoudt, Mark Malone, David Woodley, Scott Campbell, Bubby Brister, Steve Bono, Todd Blackledge, Neil O'Donnell, Mike Tomczak, Jim Miller, Kent Graham and Tommy Maddox. They are the other Steelers quarterbacks who followed Bradshaw and preceded Roethlisberger.

Who knows how much better Stewart would have been with more stable coaching? It's not just that he played for five offensive coordinators during his eight seasons with the Steelers: Ron Erhardt, Chan Gailey, Ray Sherman, Kevin Gilbride and Mike Mularkey. None of the coaches seemed to know how best to use him. He was a multitalented quarterback long before the world heard of Tim Tebow. But he was about 10 times better than Tebow.

It's still hard to believe that Stewart was benched at various times for Tomczak, Maddox and, especially, Graham. He was benched pretty much for good in the third game of the 2002 season. Imagine that. Pro Bowl in '01. Benched early in '02. Released before the '03 season.

That's some fast fall.

It would have been nice if Stewart had taken a bit more blame after losses. That couldn't have hurt his popularity. Too often, he would say, "It's not just me out there." Of course, he was right, but no one wants to hear that from the quarterback. Roethlisberger gets it. He's always the first to say after every loss, "Put the blame on me." No one is going to question his intelligence.

But, as far as I can remember, Stewart never lashed out publicly about his treatment from the Steelers. He also never took on the alleged fans who made him the target of their hateful rumors about his personal life. He again dismissed all of it this week -- even the frightening death threats -- as a part of the "high expectations" that people have for all Steelers quarterbacks.

Stewart is a bigger man than me.

I would have said the hell with Pittsburgh.

I wouldn't have come back.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/sports/ron-cook/cook-a-curious-choice-but-for-stewart-the-right-one-638453/#ixzz1wW7dbc4B

One helluva article. For every diehard Steelers fan, there's a dickface laying somewhere underneath that gives fanbase's a bad name. Kordell Stewart was and always will be one of my favorite Steelers & for this fan, it brought a smile to my face to see him come back and retire a Steeler.

What Ron said in his article is something I've been saying for YEARS, especially the part about playing for different coordinators and QB coach's who had no idea what to do with him. They always say the Steelers don't rebuild, they reload. Well, Stewart played in an era where the Steelers were rebuilding, especially the '98-'99 seasons. Everyone forgets what he did in the year 2000 (his most brilliant year in my opinion), where he saved us from the abortion that was Kent Graham.

#10 was always on a short leash and for that, never had a chance at long term success. Judging by what I saw, he made the best out of his shitty opportunities and for that, he'll always rank high on MY list of favorite Steelers players.

Bayz101
06-01-2012, 12:36 PM
That's not confirmation... 5th post of the thread says that they refused a one day contract for others that requested it as was expected to be the case for Kordell.

It's all hokey warm and fuzzy stuff anyway, so in the end, it really doesn't matter.

Stewart wanted to come home to Pittsburgh, where he became a sensation in the late-1990s as "Slash" Stewart, part-time quarterback, part-time running back, part-time wide receiver, full-time excitement.

"This where it all started, this where all my success was," Stewart said on Wednesday just before signing a one-day contract so he could retire as a member of the Steelers. "This was the closure I wanted to have and needed to have with my career."


Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/football/nfl/05/30/kordell.stewart.ap/index.html#ixzz1wYnX9wHF

:thumbsup:

steelax04
06-01-2012, 02:52 PM
Stewart wanted to come home to Pittsburgh, where he became a sensation in the late-1990s as "Slash" Stewart, part-time quarterback, part-time running back, part-time wide receiver, full-time excitement.

"This where it all started, this where all my success was," Stewart said on Wednesday just before signing a one-day contract so he could retire as a member of the Steelers. "This was the closure I wanted to have and needed to have with my career."


Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/football/nfl/05/30/kordell.stewart.ap/index.html#ixzz1wYnX9wHF

:thumbsup:

Hopefully it didn't mess up their salary cap... :chuckle:

TheVet
06-01-2012, 02:53 PM
From the Ron Cook article:
Stewart once predicted he would make the Hall of Fame. He fell considerably short, but he was better than everyone on this list: Cliff Stoudt, Mark Malone, David Woodley, Scott Campbell, Bubby Brister, Steve Bono, Todd Blackledge, Neil O'Donnell, Mike Tomczak, Jim Miller, Kent Graham and Tommy Maddox. They are the other Steelers quarterbacks who followed Bradshaw and preceded Roethlisberger.

Agree or disagree, one thing is certain - Ron Cook will always dramatically overstate his case. Today, I must disagree.

In this list, Maddox and Tomczak were clearly far superior to Kordell, and I'd take Brister also - and there are several others who were at least Kordell's equal. Why? Because Kordell was a hell of an athlete, but lets be honest - this man could not throw an accurate pass to save his life. He just couldn't do it.

Yes, we loved Slash, and all the exciting scrambles, but at some point your QB simply must be capable of completing a pass. We gave him chance after chance for so many seasons, far more than we would have given a less gifted athlete. We all rooted for him to turn the corner, but it never happened.

At the end of the day, he just was not an NFL QB. An NFL QB simply must be able to throw an accurate pass, at least once in awhile. Kordell never got there.

MasterOfPuppets
06-01-2012, 03:07 PM
some of those teams kordell played on were super bowl calibre teams. kordell was the reason they always fell short. that bum always saved his worst games for the playoffs..
:mad:
anyone remember his brilliant 3 pick and a fumble performance against denver in the afc championship game ?

Hawaii 5-0
06-01-2012, 10:03 PM
Is Steeler Nation Too Hard On Quarterbacks?

Jun 1st, 2012 by KIMMY

http://nicepickcowher.com/files/2012/06/Kordell-Stewart-retires-as-a-Steeler-I41J1T35-x-large-300x220.jpg?e98d57

As all the hoopla surrounding the retirement of Kordell Stewart dies down this week I’ve started to think about Steeler Nation and their history, and present, when it comes to how they deal with their quarterback. We are rightfully brutal on opposing quarterbacks, Joe Flacco looks like Bert from Seasame Street, Tom Brady may have girl parts, and Carrot top aka Andy Dalton has just begun to learn how much Steeler Nation loves to harass opposing teams’ quarterbacks. But how do we do with our own? Not very good if you ask me. Kordell spoke of receiving death threats from fans during his poor performing seasons, Tommy Maddox got garbage thrown on his yard and his kids were harassed in school, and Ben can’t open his mouth without constant criticism of anything and everything he says. So why are we so harsh on our own quarterbacks? Possibly it’s the high standard that has been set in this town, whether it is the legendary quarterbacks that have come from Western Pennsylvania or the standard of 4 Super Bowls won by Bradshaw, Steeler Nation has a constant love-hate relationship with its quarterbacks.

First off, for those who have taken their fandom to the level of harassing children or sending death threats you might as well go ahead and check yourself into the nearest mental health facility because you have issues that don’t have anything to do with football scores. I’m as passionate as the next fan and I’ll believe till the day I die that Neil O’Donnell was paid off by Jerry Jones to throw those two interceptions to Larry Brown in Super Bowl XXX but that’s just part of my charm. What possesses people to threaten harm to athletes or other celebrities when things don’t go their way will never be something I can wrap my head around. But it’s in our nature, especially as members of Steeler Nation, to be critical of our players when we invest so much of our time and energy into the team. We’ve earned the right to scream “Aw you bum!” at the TV when an interception is thrown, it’s behavior that’s passed on from generation to generation.

Kordell Stewart wasn’t the first Steelers quarterback to have a love-hate relationship with the fans. I’ll never forget how my grandmother always called Terry Bradshaw an “a-hole” when she saw him on camera. Even 4-time Super Bowl Champion Terry Bradshaw wasn’t immune to the sometimes bi-polar emotions of Steeler fans. Bradshaw was largely criticized for not returning to city after leaving the Steelers. When you think about it, Franco Harris will show up for a gas station opening around town but no one could get ever Bradshaw to show up in Pittsburgh for any event or occasion up until recently. Kordell’s criticism was mostly due to his lackluster performances in his two starts in the AFC Championship game. Throwing 3 interceptions in each AFC Championship will definitely not land you on the good side of Steeler Nation.

http://nicepickcowher.com/files/2012/06/6270254.jpg?e98d57

Ben hasn’t been a stranger to criticism from Steeler Nation in the least bit. Some of it has been well deserved as there has been a few years where Ben has made it very difficult to be a fan what with his “incidents” in the offseason and whatnot. Lately the microscope has been on Ben since he lost his BFF and favorite play-caller, Bruce Arians. Anything Ben says about the departure of BA and the arrival of Todd Haley, along with what “direction” this offense might be going in is closely criticized and largely blown out of proportion. Recently Ben was quoted as to saying that the offense was going to run the ball more this season and the fans are “getting their wish”. If you’re not a fan of endless debate on whether or not Ben is a whiner or a big baby still pouting over the loss of BA, you might want to stay off of Twitter when you see that he’s made any kind of comment. In my opinion, the drama surrounding Ben’s opinion/first impression/overall feelings towards Todd Haley has been largely manufactured and overstated by the local media in order to keep churning out stories on the Steelers during the offseason. I’m not saying Ben is perfect and everything he says is golden, but it seems to me that no other player aside from him is as critiqued on his comments. Must be because he’s the quarterback.

When you’re the quarterback of a Six Time Super Bowl Championship organization, you’re going to come across some harsh critics along with adoring fans, it just comes with the territory. Whether you contributed to those rings or contributed to missed opportunities for more rings might determine the severity of the disparagement. Of course Kordell didn’t do anything to deserve death threats, Tommy Maddox didn’t deserve garbage on his lawn, and Bradshaw didn’t deserve the verbal abuse he unknowingly received from my grandmother on a regular basis. But these are professional athletes in the most passionate football town in the world. It’s heartwarming that after all the death threats and negative attention, Kordell still thought so highly of the Steelers and the city of Pittsburgh that he would go through the ridiculous publicity of retiring from a team he hasn’t taken a snap for in almost a decade. Must mean that no matter how rocky the love-hate relationship Steeler Nation has with our quarterback, the love always outweighs the hate.

http://nicepickcowher.com/2012/06/01/is-steeler-nation-too-hard-on-quarterbacks/

mesaSteeler
06-02-2012, 01:04 AM
More Kordell
http://blogs.sites.post-gazette.com/index.php/sports/blog-n-gold/34320-more-kordell
Thursday, 31 May 2012 09:14
Written by Dan Gigler

When Kordell Stewart visited the Steelers' facility yesterday to "retire" as a Pittsburgh Steeler, he did so seeking some closure for a chapter of his life that was publicly tumultuous -- few players in the last 20 years have been as polarizing in Pittsburgh as Stewart. Only Barry Bonds and Jaromir Jagr come to mind and they mostly became villains only after they'd left town. Even Neil O' Donnell, who had bigger game failures as a Steeler than Stewart and took jabs at Pittsburgh on his way to New York, was never as vilified as Stewart.

If you don't believe me, read the comments in this blog post.

In a matter of only one season, Stewart went from toast-of-the-town superstar to being positively abused by Steelers fans at home games, and by media and fans on talk radio and in the papers. To be fair, he played terribly at times, but the rumors that swirled regarding his personal life were shameful, a low point in Pittsburgh sports fandom. He took entirely too much blame for the Steelers' 2001 AFC Championship loss -- during which Jerome Bettis was completely ineffectual, the special teams gave up two touchdowns, the defense was shredded by Drew Bledsoe -- and was gone a year after his best professional season.

Stewart spoke at length about his career and was positive about his experience in Pittsburgh and gracious the fans, who were occassionally rotten to him.

Here's some of that, and some other things that didn't make it into the paper:

kordell-stewartOn Steelers fans and the razzing he got from them:

As far as the boos were concerned, it comes with the territory. You have to really be proud of these fans here in the City of Pittsburgh, because they want greatness. They love their Steelers and all they want to see are wins. They were spoiled with what took place in the 70s with Terry Bradshaw and company, and rightfully so -- that’s why you play the game, is to win. And [we] came close, came up short but at the same time it was a great run, and a great time.

On Art Rooney II embracing the idea of him "retiring" as a Steeler:

That meant a lot because let me know how much they appreciate what I'd done and its not going to always be championships. ... And you get so close and you come short the only thing you can do is say, y'know what, I appreciate that experience ... that’s the energy I got from Mr. Rooney. And I just want to tell him again as well as [Dan] Rooney the appreciation I have towards them. They'd given me a chance and stuck by me through those tough times ... everybody that knows me understands when I do speak about the Rooney family and how they conduct their business they do it better than anybody.

On Todd Haley, who was the WR coach during Stewart's stint in Chicago:

What you have here with Coach Haley, in my mind, and the experience I've had with him is a guy who going to be hard on you because he wants to get the best out of you. He wont spoil you, he wont make you feel good about yourself, he's gonna make you work. I think ben is having the opporuntiy to understand that with the transition of going to another system, hes also going to have some hardship in there as well. The best thing ben can do, and I think he's doing a good job … is to work together and know that Rome wasn’t built in a day. Its gonna take some time. And of course after winning championships and going to championships you want to get it done right now, you want to be comfortable right now. ...

Did he regret giving up the Slash role?

No, no. Not at all. That was a situation that grew on its own. We had Neil O' Donnell get hurt that year, Rod Woodson hurt his knee trying to tackle Barry Sanders on the Three Rivers turf. The receivers went down, Charles Johnson, the list kept going on and on of things happening.

Coming from Colorado, it was all about the team and what you could do to help, and I just felt like with my talents, in my mind I can help the team some kind of way, and I asked Coach Cowher, can I help? And it went from a 3rd & 15 play against the Jacksonville Jaguars in the shotgun and getting a first down to getting in practice and catching the ball and Coach Cowher asking me would I like to help out doing other things? As long as I had an opportunitty to start on this football team, sure, no problem.

One thing led to another, it exploded and of course the fan base and the media was really attached to it and wanting it continuously to happen, but that wasn't the reason why I came into the league. The reason I came into the league was to be a quarterback, which is what I've always been. Its just that my talents allowed me to do some other things and it helped us get to a championship. Of course that's what everybody fell in love with a little bit -- I did too -- but I wanted to play quarterback. And I ended up doing it and going to the Pro Bowl doing it.

Was he ever genuinely concerned about threats he received?

Never. People aren't crazy. They just act out of line ... We had enough security around here to protect the players, and this organization did a phenomanol job to protect us and monitor it. ... But again, its part of the game. It happened to Terry Bradshaw. It happened to Joe Gilliam. … in some cases, it may happen to Ben, and other players on this football team. Ovfer the years it just came with ther territory - and if you can keep it in perspective, it can never be personal.

TheVet
06-02-2012, 01:58 AM
The reason I came into the league was to be a quarterback, which is what I've always been. Its just that my talents allowed me to do some other things and it helped us get to a championship. Of course that's what everybody fell in love with a little bit -- I did too -- but I wanted to play quarterback. And I ended up doing it and going to the Pro Bowl doing it.
Kordell could have been great if he had focused on those "talents that allowed [him] to do some other things." But lets not make this overly complicated: QBs must be able to pass. After that, the "other things" come into play.

Blackout
06-02-2012, 05:02 AM
One of the things that sticks out to me from Kordell was just how fast he ran.

ricardisimo
06-02-2012, 05:20 AM
If Kordell had been willing to play receiver, he could have had quite a career - he might still be playing today. Unfortunately, he missed his true path.
Uhhh... he's going to be 40 this year. I don't think he'd still be playing as a punter, let alone a wide receiver.

And another thing: although I actually liked Kordell quite a bit (he was almost unbearably exciting and people seem to forget that we won a lot of games with him under center) Neil O'Donnell was quite a bit better than him, contrary to what that idiot Cook seems to suggest.

4xSBChamps
06-02-2012, 07:43 AM
Is Steeler Nation Too Hard On Quarterbacks?


http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y272/Glensgages/football/001-1.jpg

StainlessStill
06-02-2012, 10:39 AM
some of those teams kordell played on were super bowl calibre teams. kordell was the reason they always fell short. that bum always saved his worst games for the playoffs..
:mad:
anyone remember his brilliant 3 pick and a fumble performance against denver in the afc championship game ?

I remember that. I also remember that same bum a week earlier against New England scamper 70 some yards to the endzone to score the games only touchdown to send us off to the AFC Championship game.

zcoop
06-02-2012, 12:33 PM
I remember that. I also remember that same bum a week earlier against New England scamper 70 some yards to the endzone to score the games only touchdown to send us off to the AFC Championship game.

Yep, I remember that too, but some only want to focus on the negative. Kordell had a lot on his plate when he played. It ain't easy having an adversary both on the field and in your own back yard.

StainlessStill
06-02-2012, 12:48 PM
People would say 1997 & 2001 were Kordell's best seasons, but his most brilliant one, IMHO, came in 2000. He saved us from that ABORTION that was Kent Graham and got us one win away from making the post-season.

Kordell's brilliance and best game came in 2000 against Oakland (who was an AFC POWERHOUSE at the time) at Three Rivers Stadium where he injured his leg and went into the locker room where everyone was unaware of his status.

At halftime, he came back out and rallied our comeback to beat Oakland 21-20 (I believe) when Janikowski missed a FG at the end of the game. I also remember Kreider's first carry of the game went for like 20 yards. I have a deep mind when comes to this stuff but can't remember what I did yesterday, haha.:tt04:

4xSBChamps
06-02-2012, 01:03 PM
Kordell's brilliance and best game came in 2000 against Oakland (who was an AFC POWERHOUSE at the time) at Three Rivers Stadium where he injured his leg and went into the locker room where everyone was unaware of his status.

At halftime, he came back out and rallied our comeback to beat Oakland 21-20

I know that my memory is failing me, but didn't he also take a nasty helmet to the chin in this game, requiring stitches, yet missed just a few snaps?

to confuse Stewart with Woodley, Graham, Miller, and other mediocre Steeler QB is foolish

Hawaii 5-0
06-02-2012, 02:40 PM
My Top 10 Memories Of Kordell Stewart With The Steelers

Jun 2nd, 2012 by DomSteelers

http://nicepickcowher.com/files/2012/06/nfl_runninqbs08_800-1-300x168.jpg?e98d57

If you the readers did not already hear, or read Jeff’s awesome post, Pittsburgh’s former starting Quarterback Kordell Stewart officially retired from football on Wednesday as a member of the Steelers. As we all remember, and would like to forget at times, Kordell’s career with Pittsburgh was highlighted by the “highest of highs” and unfortunately the “lowest of lows.” Because Kordell never led the Steelers to a title, most of us, myself included, have thought much more about the lows than the highs in the seasons since he left town.

Yet for all of his down-moments which we choose to remember, he also made some pretty incredible plays and played some great games for the Steelers during his tenure in Pittsburgh. With that in mind, I thought it would be nice to shy away from a “Negative Nancy” attitude and post my “Top Ten” Memories of Kordell Stewart’s career with the Steelers.

10. Kordell’s First Professional Touchdown Pass
Monday Night Football
Steelers 20 vs. Browns 3
November 13, 1995

After the 5-4 Steelers got through a marathon of an Overtime game against Chicago the week before, they took on the 4-5 Browns on Monday Night Football at Three Rivers Stadium in an important A.F.C. Central game This provided a great setting for “Slash” to show off his talents. Stewart actually kicked off the scoring in the 2nd Quarter when the Steelers entered the Red Zone. I can still remember how excited I was to see him in the game lined up at Quarterback at the 2 Yard Line with a chance to score. He did not disappoint me in that specific instance.

Kordell’s first ever Touchdown pass illustrated not only his athleticism, but his ability to put pressure on the opposition because of his versatility. He rolled all the way to the right sideline from the left hash, saw nothing, then rolled back to the left and found a wide-open Ernie Mills for the score in the back of the end zone to draw first blood! It was a good night for Stewart overall, as he ran the option a bit and racked up 13 Yards rushing and made 2 grabs for 21 Yards as well.

9. “Slash” Does It All Against the Patriots
Steelers 41 vs. Patriots 27
December 16, 1995

In a late season game against the Patriots during his Rookie season, Kordell was at his versatile “best” and chipped in nicely that afternoon. Kordell’s best play came when he turned a 22 Yard run into a Touchdown in the 3rd Quarter and extended the Steelers’ lead to 24-12 in a game they eventually won late in the 4th Quarter. The run was quite impressive as Stewart made a couple guys miss and slipped a Tackle inside the 10. On the day, Kordell even threw a few passes and went 2 for 3 for 41 Yards in addition to his 25 Yards total on the ground. It was just another day at the office for the Steelers and Stewart as the team was working him steadily into their game plans.

8. Career-High Run in Carolina
Panthers 18 vs. Steelers 14
December 22, 1996

Nothing was there, so he just stepped up in the pocket and started to run. The thing was, nobody caught him. Thanks to the Defense covering the Receivers and some solid blocks down the field, Stewart got to the second level and just turned on the jets down the left sideline and did not stop until he crossed into the end zone. This play was Kordell making something out of nothing, and essentially outrunning an entire Defense by himself. Kordell did not have a great day otherwise (8 for 21 for 77 Yards and 2 INT’s), because despite the fact that the Steelers led 14-9 and Stewart’s run plus an Andrew Hastings’ Touchdown catch erased a 9-0 deficit, the Steelers lost the game in the Second Half. Nevertheless, not many Running Backs break 80 Yard runs in their careers, and Stewart’s sprint in Charlotte was pretty darn incredible that day.

7. “Slash” Has Best Day as a Passer Ever
Steelers 23 vs. Jaguars 17 (OT)
October 26, 1997

Kordell Stewart picked the right regular season game to throw for the most Yards during his career, because the Steelers needed every one of them that afternoon/evening as they beat the Jaguars and catapulted themselves into 1st place in the A.F.C. Central that season. Down 10-0 at Halftime, the Steelers and Stewart responded like champions. Stewart directed a scoring drive capped off by a 28 Yard Touchdown pass to Courtney Hawkins to make the game 10-7. Then a defensive stand at the Goal Line allowed the Steelers to take over at their own 2, and Stewart led a 98 Yard scoring drive which ended with a 1 Yard Touchdown run by him. Jacksonville then went ahead 17-14, and the Steelers tied it on a Norm Johnson Field Goal with just over 2 minutes to play.

The stage was set for Overtime, and Kordell and Jerome Bettis played the heroes. Stewart flipped a shovel pass to Bettis just inside the Jaguars’ 20 Yard Line, and the 17 Yard Touchdown catch and run was a walk-off win of epic proportions and a coming out party for “Slash” the Quarterback. Stewart threw for 317 Yards and the 2 Touchdowns, and rushed for 37 and the first go-ahead score. With the win, Pittsburgh had taken a 1-game lead over the Jaguars for the Divisional crown, and as the season unfolded, this was the game which ultimately gave the Steelers the upper-hand in the A.F.C. Central.

6. Tight-rope Run Just Enough for Steelers to Win
A.F.C. Divisional Playoff
Steelers 7 vs. Patriots 6
January 3, 1998

The Steelers faced off against the Patriots in the Divisional Round of the 1997 Playoffs at Three Rivers Stadium, and boy what a Defensive struggle it was. Despite the fact that only 13 points total were scored, it did not stop Kordell Stewart from making the game’s biggest play in the 1st Quarter. Stewart raced down the sideline on a run near midfield and proceeded to score the game’s only Touchdown on said 40 yard dash. The run was huge because it would be the only points that the Steelers would score that day. Tight-roping the sidelines and making something out of nothing with his legs, Kordell was his vintage self on that play. The rest of Stewart’s day was rather pedestrian (14 for 31 for 134 Yards and 1 INT), but the fact he could rip off a 40 Yard run when it was open for him to do so reminds me of how much of a weapon he truly was that season.

5. First Touchdown Catch Propels Steelers to Victory
Steelers 49 vs. Bengals 31
November 19, 1995

In the 3rd Quarter of a must-win game against a Divisional foe in Week 12, the Steelers began to mount a ridiculous comeback with an Offensive explosion of sorts. Down 31-13, Pittsburgh needed points, and needed them fast. Thanks to a Bam Morris 1 Yard TD run, an Andre Hastings 15 Yard TD catch, and an Erric Pegram 2 Point Conversion, the Steelers had quickly moved to within striking distance of Cincinnati. Then Neil O’Donnell went for broke in the 4th Quarter to take the lead and looked to his Rookie jack-of-all-trades trough the air.

O’Donnell found Stewart in the seam on a deep pass, and Stewart broke about 3 Tackles on his way to the goal line. It was ridiculous because Stewart had zero experience at Wide Receiver prior to his Rookie season, yet here he was running routes like a champ and giving the Offense yet another added dimension. Pittsburgh took the lead for good at 35-31, and added two more Touchdowns by game’s end to make the score 49-31 and cap off an important comeback.

4. Kordell and His Toughness at Three Rivers
Steelers 21 vs. Raiders 20
December 3, 2000

This was one of Kordell’s finest moments because he fought off an injury to not only return to an important game, but return to an important game and play well. Stewart had the Steelers in the lead early 7-0, but was knocked out of the game for almost the rest of the Half due to a leg injury. His backup Kent Graham proceeded to throw a Pick-6, the Offense went stagnant, and the Steelers found themselves in a 17-7 hole at Half Time.

To his credit, Kordell showed how tough he really was that day when he came back into the game in the 3rd Quarter and sparked a Steelers comeback. Stewart led a 91 Yard drive, and converted what looked to be a disastrous play where he fumbled into a 1st Down when he smartly raced upfield for the yardage necessary. Kordell found Tight End Mark Bruener for a 6 Yard Touchdown and the score later to cap off the drive and pull the Steelers to within 3 points. Two possessions later, Stewart grabbed the Steelers the lead when he scored on a 17 Yard Touchdown run and made the score 21-20 at the beginning of the 4th Quarter! Pittsburgh held tough to win the game and Stewart finished with 2 Passing Touchdowns and 1 Rushing Touchdown and was thus responsible for all points scored.

3. Kordell’s Mad-Dash at Memorial Stadium
Steelers 42 vs. Ravens 34
October 5, 1997

Like the run in Carolina the year before, this play was all about Kordell and him beating the Defense with his legs. Kordell had already thrown for 3 Touchdowns in the game and rushed for one, but he most importantly had helped the Steelers erase 21-0 and 24-7 deficits in the 1st Half. Then late in the 4th Quarter, with the Steelers clinging to a 35-32 lead, a big play was needed to ice the game. Stewart knew what to do and rolled left and did not stop. Kordell raced 74 Yards for the clinching score to put the Steelers ahead 42-32, and finish a game where he would eventually account for 5 total Touchdowns. His 3 Interceptions from the game were less than stellar, but he more than made up for them with his numerous big plays that afternoon.

2. “Slash’s” Postseason Touchdown Grab
Steelers 20 vs. Colts 16
A.F.C. Championship Game
January, 14 1996

Down 6-3 to the underdog Colts at Three Rivers Stadium, and in need of a big play, Quarterback Neil O’Donnell and Offensive Coordinator Ron Erhardt dialed up a pass-play on 3rd and Goal late in the 1st Half to try and steal momentum. While Indianapolis had the play covered well, Kordell Stewart eventually got open and caught the 5 Yard pass for a score which put his team ahead 10-6 before they headed into the locker room.

Kudos needs to go to the Offensive Line for giving O’Donnell eons of time to roll out and find Kordell in the back of the end zone for the score. Did Kordell step out of bounds? He sure did. Was he shoved a bit? Maybe. But he still scored and it was a big play the team certainly needed because they won the game by 4 points. Had Stewart not scored a Touchdown, the game would have gone to Overtime, or Indianapolis could have won the game on a Field Goal on their final drive. It was a big play in a big situation, and the team and Stewart alike came through

1. Kordell Involved on all Five Touchdowns versus Denver
Steelers 35 vs. Broncos 24
December 7, 1997

This game by far featured my most favorite Kordell Stewart moments. Not only because “Slash” was responsible for all 5 of his team’s Touchdowns, but because it was against the Broncos, and it was during the time in my childhood when I lived in Denver and my Mom and I were surrounded by the arrogant denizens of Broncos fans everywhere we went.

Stewart dug his team out of a 21-7 hole, and fired all 3 of his Touchdown passes to Yancey Thigpen (6 Catches for 175 Yards) to tie the game with Denver at 21 at Half Time. Denver took a 24-21 lead in the 3rd Quarter, but Stewart and the Offense struck back, and Kordell scored on a 4 Yard Touchdown run to give the Steelers their first lead of the game at 28-24. Like he did a couple of months before in Baltimore, Stewart iced the game himself as he scooted up the middle for a 9 Yard Touchdown run to put Pittsburgh ahead 35-24!
At 10 years old, Kordell was my hero that day. While I understand now that football is a team game, it seemed to me like Kordell beat the Broncos by himself because he just made important “splash play” after important “splash play.” And as a young Steelers fan, stuck in Denver, and with an already immense disdain for the Broncos, this game will always hold a special place in my memory bank, and a tip of the cap will always go to Kordell for his efforts that day.

So there you have it readers. Now it is time for you to share. Do you have any positive thoughts or memories about Kordell or a specific performance of his during his career? If so, what are they? Don’t be shy, and share them in the “Comments” section.

Statistics Courtesy of http://www.pro-football-reference.com/

tanda10506
06-02-2012, 04:31 PM
some of those teams kordell played on were super bowl calibre teams. kordell was the reason they always fell short. that bum always saved his worst games for the playoffs..
:mad:
anyone remember his brilliant 3 pick and a fumble performance against denver in the afc championship game ?

I remember it :banging::banging::banging:. He made some good plays and had some good games from time to time, but the blunders and choke games were just to many to overcome.

TheVet
06-02-2012, 11:52 PM
Uhhh... he's going to be 40 this year. I don't think he'd still be playing as a punter, let alone a wide receiver.

And another thing: although I actually liked Kordell quite a bit (he was almost unbearably exciting and people seem to forget that we won a lot of games with him under center) Neil O'Donnell was quite a bit better than him, contrary to what that idiot Cook seems to suggest.

I mentioned Tomczak and Maddox from that list, because I don't think anybody can really argue that Kordell was at their level (and I personally think Brister was better, as well).

But as much as Kordell sucked, I can't honestly say that O'Donnell was better, or even equal. O'Donnell was the master of the 1 or 2 net yard pass, and that was it - nothing else in the toolbox. Give me Kordell with no passing ability whatsoever, but at least the ability to make something happen with his feet.

Out of curiosity, what exactly did you see in O'Donnell? I saw another weak journeyman stopping by Three Rivers to visit for a few years.

MasterOfPuppets
06-03-2012, 01:01 AM
I remember that. I also remember that same bum a week earlier against New England scamper 70 some yards to the endzone to score the games only touchdown to send us off to the AFC Championship game.
i think your memory deceives you. it was a 40 yd run.
did you also recall his 45% completion percentage for 134 yds and a pick or the 44.3 qb rating he put up ?
the TD run was also in the first quarter so don't make it sound like it was 4th quarter heroics. that game was won by the D DESPITE kordells horrible qb play.
but i digress .. he was amazing...:coffee:

MasterOfPuppets
06-03-2012, 01:25 AM
Yep, I remember that too, but some only want to focus on the negative. Kordell had a lot on his plate when he played. It ain't easy having an adversary both on the field and in your own back yard.
here's the undisputed facts...
kordell started 4 playoff games.
his qb ratings in those 4 games..

97 NE ............44.3
97 denver .....41.6
01 balt.............72.9
01 NE..............45.4

passing - 2 tds....8 ints

yep... those stats speak of a football god...:popcorn:
god bless tommy madox for ridding us of that turd ....:beerbang:

StainlessStill
06-03-2012, 01:10 PM
i think your memory deceives you. it was a 40 yd run.
did you also recall his 45% completion percentage for 134 yds and a pick or the 44.3 qb rating he put up ?
the TD run was also in the first quarter so don't make it sound like it was 4th quarter heroics. that game was won by the D DESPITE kordells horrible qb play.
but i digress .. he was amazing...:coffee:

Lookout, we got a badass here, lmao. First off, I was paraphrasing and reminiscing. So it was a 40 yard run, fact remains, the only touchdown scored in the divisional round came from Stewart. Using logic, if Kordell doesn't scamper 40 yards to the endzone, New England advances. Kordell was the difference-maker that game in a defensive struggle. Atleast give him that much credit.

Kordell was average, tilting good at BEST as an overall QB here in Pittsburgh. All I'm saying is judging by how HORRID he played within his tenure in Pittsburgh, he played just as good, if not better, in others.

StainlessStill
06-03-2012, 01:22 PM
For the record, if you want to deflate Kordell's playoff stats, then the guy behind him, who was literally the teams workhorse to begin with to where the offense was modeled around, Jerome Bettis, should shoulder some of the blame as well.

Other than the Denver game, who I blame Bill Cowher for being BONE-HEADED for not feeding a primed Bus, Bettis did his best Houdini act in mostly every playoff run, which led to overwhelming pressure on Stewart to take control of a run first, run OR bust football team. In 2001, I recall our Special Teams giving up 14 points. Even though Kordell threw 2 int's on those last drives, atleast he put together a drive that put us within a touchdown and be in it.

Bettis:
--------
New England '97
Attempts: 25
Yards: 67
YPC: 2.7
TD: 0

Denver '97
Attempts: 25
Yards: 105
YPC: 4.6

Baltimore '01:
OUT

Patriots '01:
Attempts: 9
Yards: 8
TD: 1

We were always one QB in the clutch away from possibly owning atleast 2 more SB rings and the Kordell-era proved that (such a reason is why I ADORE Ben Roethlisberger) but we got to where we were in both 1997 & 2001 because of Kordell Stewart's overall season performance.

ricardisimo
06-03-2012, 07:51 PM
I mentioned Tomczak and Maddox from that list, because I don't think anybody can really argue that Kordell was at their level (and I personally think Brister was better, as well).

But as much as Kordell sucked, I can't honestly say that O'Donnell was better, or even equal. O'Donnell was the master of the 1 or 2 net yard pass, and that was it - nothing else in the toolbox. Give me Kordell with no passing ability whatsoever, but at least the ability to make something happen with his feet.

Out of curiosity, what exactly did you see in O'Donnell? I saw another weak journeyman stopping by Three Rivers to visit for a few years.
Really? Steelers fans really are the least grateful in the world. For starters, we won an awful lot of games with him, just like with Kordell. Secondly, unlike Kordell, we lost almost none because of O'Donnell. Thirdly, he ranks 2nd all-time in interception percentage, behind only Aaron Rodgers. Fourthly, as far as his net yards, he had an adjusted net yards per attempt of 5.6 while in Pittsburgh. Jim Kelly, for comparison, had 5.9, and he was no slouch at QB.

People should try harder at appreciating the quality of starters we've had over the years. These people gave us some good times.

Atlanta Dan
06-03-2012, 08:19 PM
Really? Steelers fans really are the least grateful in the world. For starters, we won an awful lot of games with him, just like with Kordell. Secondly, unlike Kordell, we lost almost none because of O'Donnell.

With the minor exception of Super Bowl XXX:chuckle:

Seeing as that was O'Donnell's last game with the Steelers, some impressions are built to last

TheVet
06-04-2012, 12:08 AM
Really? Steelers fans really are the least grateful in the world. For starters, we won an awful lot of games with him, just like with Kordell. Secondly, unlike Kordell, we lost almost none because of O'Donnell. Thirdly, he ranks 2nd all-time in interception percentage, behind only Aaron Rodgers. Fourthly, as far as his net yards, he had an adjusted net yards per attempt of 5.6 while in Pittsburgh. Jim Kelly, for comparison, had 5.9, and he was no slouch at QB.

People should try harder at appreciating the quality of starters we've had over the years. These people gave us some good times.

Yes, O'Donnell had a very low interception percentage (which also accounts for the adjusted net yards per attempt statistics). He took a very low risk, low reward approach. Agreed that he didn't lose games like Kordell, but on the other hand, he didn't go out and win them, either. Two different styles of mediocre, in my opinion.

I'm not dumping on Kordell or O'Donnell; they were both journeymen who spent some time here during the decades when we were searching for a leader at QB. Certainly, we saw many weaker QBs during that time.

Hawaii 5-0
07-10-2012, 12:19 AM
One Word Defines Kordell Stewart's Legacy

by Hombre de Acero on Jul 9, 2012


Last month Kordell Stewart proved he had a unique talent that no one could dispute: Stirring up controversy within Steelers Nation.

Kordell's surprise "retirement" puzzled, amused, and rekindled old arguments among the faithful.

I wrote an in-depth retrospective on Kordell's career as a Steeler, but 2020 words later I felt that, while I had a good analytical grasp of his playing career, I was still left struggling to understand "what it all meant."

My moment of insight came when I stumbled upon Ron Cook's claim in the Post Gazette that "[Kordell] was the Steelers' best quarterback between four-time Super Bowl winner Terry Bradshaw and two-time Super Bowl winner Ben Roethlisberger."

Even after having defended Kordell ad nauseam in watering holes throughout Steelers Nation, Cook's contention struck me as preposterous.

But the more I wrestled with it, the more Cook's contention made sense.

It doesn't matter that hard statistics indicate that at Neil O'Donnell (and perhaps Tommy Maddox) were better than Kordell. Neither is it important that O'Donnell, unlike Stewart, rallied his team from behind in an AFC Championship game and at least gave Pittsburgh a shot at One for the Thumb.

None of that is really relevant because, at the end of the day, a single word defines Kordell Stewart's legacy.

Emotion.

Emotion defined everything about Kordell Stewart, both on and off the field. Emotion fueled front office and coaching decisions, and emotion lay at the core of every conversation that two Steelers fans had about Number 10.

Remember "Slash's" days of glory in 1995? Number 10 was the toast of Steelers Nation. He could wrong and was the man credited with loosening up Ron Erhardt's stiff offense.

Never mind that the loosening up process began in 1994 during O'Donnell's mid-season benching. Emotion trumps rationality in memory.

And so it should, sometimes, as Kordell certainly gave the Steelers offense a dynamism that it never would have attained he remained a 4th string quarterback in street clothes.

But if emotion can help fuel a run to the Super Bowl it can also delude under other circumstances.

Mike Tomzcak played uncharacteristically well at the outset of 1996, but by season's end he was finding mediocrity. Bill Cowher knew this but felt Kordell Stewart gave him the weapon he needed to rebalance the scales in Pittsburgh's favor. Kordell's 80 yard touchdown run in relief of Tomzack the season finale seemed to vindicate The Chin's gut instinct.

During the playoffs Cowher's secret weapon ran aground against the harsh reality gimmick offenses do not result in Super Bowls, as illustrated by Kordell playing for an entire half and failing to complete a single pass during Fog Bowl II.

1997: Stewart Starts and The Roller Coaster Continues

No coach of his generation wore emotions on his sleeve more prominently than Bill Cowher. And Cowher's most emotional sideline moment was his planting a kiss squarely on Kordell Stewart's cheek on a September Sunday in Baltimore.

It's easy to understand why. Kordell began the game throwing four interceptions, each interception more terrible than the one that preceded it. Yet, Kordell rallied the team to four touchdown drives, the go ahead score coming on a 70 yard scramble, followed by Cowher's kiss.

Memory tells us that this game was characteristic of the entire season - Kordell faltering only to lead the team back from the brink. I'd swear that the late season match up vs. Denver, the game marked by Carnell Lake's second shift to corner, unfolded exactly as the Baltimore game did.

Except it didn't.

Kordell did throw a pick and erratic passing did lead to some three and outs early in the game, but it was John Elway's scorching Donnell Wolford that put Pittsburgh in the hole that Kordell led them out of.

But we remember Kordell as both the antagonist and hero of that game, and almost every close game of the 1997 season, because it fits our narrative.

The Steeler-Broncos rematch in the AFC Championship reveals the flip side of how our memories spin these emotional yarns.

Does anyone remember Kordell capped a late game drive by throwing a touchdown to Charles Johnson to bring Pittsburgh within a field goal of tying? Do we recall that it was the defense failed to prevent Denver from running out the clock?

No.

Instead we remember Kordell throwing multiple interceptions at the goal line.
While Kordell certainly shouldn't be excused for the interceptions, his performance in the game that marked his first big career downturn was far more balanced than the fans, and perhaps Stewart himself, credited him for.

Emotions ran raw throughout the 1998 season, most notably Kordell's sideline confrontation with Bill Cowher, his benching, his crying and then inexplicable reinsertion back into the game.

1999: No One is Immune

But it was the front office that showed that it was not immune from the bug that off season.

The Steelers had extended Stewart's rookie contract in 1997. That meant that the Steelers had him under contract at a relatively low salary cap number for only two more years at that point, giving the franchise a lot of flexibility for dealing with their faltering starter.

Instead of hedging their bets, the front office ignored the signs that Kordell was regressing, tore up Kordell's contract and extended it through 2003 with a then unheard of 8.1 million dollar signing bonus and 22 million plus in new money.

Dan Rooney seemed to acknowledge the franchise's leap of faith at Heinz Field's ground breaking by commenting something along the lines that: "We'd like this to become the ‘House that Kordell built' but we'll see."

The only thing Kordell built in 1999 was frustration, as he regressed even further. But so did the Steelers offensive line, wide receiving corps, defensive line, and secondary.

A large swath of Steelers Nation refused to accept the later reality.

On December 12, 1999 when Qadry Ismail was burning the Steelers defense for a record 258 yards and 3 touchdowns Scott Brown, then Dean of the PSFCOM's legendary Purple Goose Saloon, sarcastically joked "Its Kordell's fault."

Many of the venerable bar's patrons missed Scotty's sarcasm, never mind the fact that Kordell had been relegated to wide receiver by that point.

(And we won't even begin to fathom the layered irrationality that led untold hundreds in Steeler Nation to swear that "My buddy's the cop who..." caught Kordell in any number of illegal and unsavory situations.)

Resurrection and End Game

Kordell Stewart would of course rise for the ashes of 1999, first helping restore the Steelers self-respect in 2000 and then taking them to another losing AFC Championship game which he took a disproportionate share of the blame.

After winning the Steelers MVP award and going to the Pro Bowl in 2001, Kordell Stewart's time as a starter ended in just three games into 2002. The suddenness and permanence of the benching caught many by complete surprise, up to and including Steelers Digest's Bob Labriola.

During ESPN Deportes Latin American broadcast of the Steelers-Colts MNF game later that year, Raul Allegre reported that Cowher had confided in him that he hadn't wanted to bench Kordell, but felt he had to because Stewart had lost the confidence of his locker room.

I'll let you decide if that amounts to a final, gut instinct decision.

But I do know that there was no objective benefit or logical reason for Kordell Stewart to fly into Pittsburgh to file his retirement papers at the South Side.

Instead it was purely a decision from the heart. A perfect ending for a player whose legacy was defined by emotion.

http://www.behindthesteelcurtain.com/2012/7/9/3145720/steelers-kordell-stewart-legacy-Bill-Cowher#storyjump

ben2hines=6
07-13-2012, 07:42 PM
cant help it, still hate the clown... and what the hell was that growth on his neck