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83-Steelers-43
07-27-2006, 09:41 AM
Phonak: Landis had positive test after Stage 17ESPN.com news services


LONDON -- Tour de France champion Floyd Landis tested positive for high levels of testosterone during the race, his Phonak team said Thursday on its Web site.

The statement came a day after cycling's world governing body said an unidentified rider had failed a drug test during the Tour.

"The Phonak Cycling Team was notified yesterday by the UCI of an unusual level of testosterone/epitestosterone ratio in the test made on Floyd Landis after stage 17 of the Tour de France," Phonak said in a team statement.

The International Cycling Union said Wednesday that an unidentified cyclist turned in a positive doping test during the Tour, widening the scandal that gripped this year's race before it began.


The organization said it wouldn't release his name, team and nationality until the testing process is completed, including the analysis of a backup sample.

Landis failed to show up for a one-day race in Denmark on Thursday, a day after missing a scheduled event in the Netherlands.

Danish organizers said they had arranged a contract and plane tickets for Landis and Phonak teammates to participate in the Grand Prix Jyske Bank race in Silkeborg, about 150 miles west of Copenhagen.

Landis also failed to appear for the Acht van Chaam race in the Netherlands on Wednesday.

Dutch news agency ANP quoted his teammate Koos Moerenhout as saying that Landis had pain from his hip problem and had gone to see his doctor in Germany.

He plans to have hip replacement surgery this fall to ease pain in the arthritic joint still aching from a 2003 crash during a training ride.

"We were told by the other two riders that he couldn't join because he was traveling with team manager [John] Lelangue to his doctor in Germany," event organizer Theo van der Westerlaken said. "That's all we know."

Landis did take part in a criterium race Tuesday in Stiphout, Netherlands, winning the event.

Landis won the Tour de France on Sunday, keeping the title in U.S. hands for the eighth straight year after Lance Armstrong's record seven victories.

On the eve of the Tour's start, nine riders -- including pre-race favorites Jan Ullrich and Ivan Basso -- were ousted, implicated in a Spanish doping investigation.


The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report.

http://sports.espn.go.com/oly/tdf2006/news/story?id=2531225

Hawk Believer
07-27-2006, 09:56 AM
Man, I hope this gets reversed by the backup sample. I just can't imagine a reasonable person doping up in the middle of the Tour and not thinking he was going to get caught.

83-Steelers-43
07-27-2006, 10:04 AM
Man, I hope this gets reversed by the backup sample. I just can't imagine a reasonable person doping up in the middle of the Tour and not thinking he was going to get caught.

I hear that. It's not looking good though. That sport is starting to become a joke.

Hawk Believer
07-27-2006, 10:21 AM
I hear that. It's not looking good though. That sport is starting to become a joke.
I think the tragedy of modern sports is that no one can do anything extraordinary these days without there being speculation of cheating. You can believe in the people you like, but you can also call them cheaters when you don't like them (please keep guffaws regarding stuck in the mud Seahawk fans to a minimum). And no one can ever truly prove they didn't take performance enhancers since you can't prove a negative.

Its too bad because it kinda makes me feel like a sucker if you cheer for a guy and then find out something like this. I don't want to turn into a total cynic regarding grand athletic achievement.

But I will await the final results of Landis before I judge. I know that some of Armstrong's old samples were incorrectly interepreted to be positive for a big L'Equipe article trying to smear him. (Not that I am positive he didn't dope)

Mosca
07-27-2006, 10:32 AM
There's two tiers of talent in cycling; Armstrong, and everyone else. So now that just about everyone else has tested positive for doping, there's only one conclusion that can be made about Armstrong...



He's an alien.


Tom

cbalke
07-27-2006, 10:49 AM
and the dude from brokeback wants his body.

lilyoder6
07-27-2006, 03:52 PM
i don't think a morman would do something like that.. if it is true it could be for his hip

Stillers#1
07-27-2006, 04:36 PM
I think the tragedy of modern sports is that no one can do anything extraordinary these days without there being speculation of cheating. You can believe in the people you like, but you can also call them cheaters when you don't like them (please keep guffaws regarding stuck in the mud Seahawk fans to a minimum). And no one can ever truly prove they didn't take performance enhancers since you can't prove a negative.

Its too bad because it kinda makes me feel like a sucker if you cheer for a guy and then find out something like this. I don't want to turn into a total cynic regarding grand athletic achievement.

But I will await the final results of Landis before I judge. I know that some of Armstrong's old samples were incorrectly interepreted to be positive for a big L'Equipe article trying to smear him. (Not that I am positive he didn't dope)

No, you got it all wrong, you can't be AMERICAN and do anything extraordinary.

MattsMe
07-27-2006, 04:40 PM
i don't think a morman would do something like that.. if it is true it could be for his hip

He's not mormon.

83-Steelers-43
07-27-2006, 04:43 PM
He's not mormon.

His parents are mennonites.

Hawk Believer
07-27-2006, 08:17 PM
Isn't he from PA?

83-Steelers-43
07-27-2006, 08:42 PM
Isn't he from PA?

Yes, Farmersville, Pa Lancaster County.

83-Steelers-43
07-28-2006, 09:01 AM
Landis denies cheating, but may lose Tour title
Associated Press
Posted: 11 minutes ago


LONDON (AP) - Floyd Landis' stunning Tour de France victory just four days earlier was thrown into question Thursday when his team said he tested positive for high levels of testosterone during the race.

The Phonak team suspended Landis, pending results of the backup "B" sample of his drug test. If Landis is found guilty of doping, he could be stripped of the Tour title and fired from the team.

But Landis told Sports Illustrated on Thursday that he didn't cheat.

"No, c'mon man," he said when asked if he used some kind of testosterone patch to gain an advantage.

In a teleconference held later, Landis said he knows his reputation might be permanently tarnished. "Unfortunately, I don't think it's ever going to go away no matter what happens next," Landis said.

"I think there's a good possibility I'll clear my name," Landis continued. "Regardless of whether this happens or not, I don't know if this will ever go away."

Landis said he wouldn't be surprised if people were skeptical of him and the sport of cycling, but he pleaded for time to clear his name.

"All I'm asking for," he said, "is that I be given a chance to prove that I'm innocent. Cycling has a traditional way of trying people in the court of public opinion before they get a chance to do anything else.

"I would like to be presumed innocent until proven guilty - since that's the way we do things in America."

Arlene Landis said her son called Thursday from Europe and told her he had not done anything wrong.

"He said, 'There's no way,"' she said in an interview with The Associated Press at her home in Farmersville, Pennsylvania. "I really believe him."

Second-place finisher Oscar Pereiro, who would become champion if Landis is not cleared, said he was in no mood to celebrate.

"Should I win the Tour now it would feel like an academic victory," Pereiro told the AP at his home in Vigo, Spain. "The way to celebrate a win is in Paris, otherwise it's just a bureaucratic win."

The Swiss-based Phonak team said it was notified by the International Cycling Union (UCI) on Wednesday that Landis' sample showed "an unusual level of testosterone/epitestosterone" when he was tested after stage 17 of the race last Thursday.

"The team management and the rider were both totally surprised of this physiological result," the Phonak statement said.

The 30-year-old Landis made a remarkable comeback in that Alpine stage, racing far ahead of the field for a solo win that moved him from 11th to third overall. Despite a degenerative hip condition that will require surgery, he regained the leader's yellow jersey two days later.

Phonak's statement came a day after the UCI, cycling's world governing body, said an unidentified rider had failed a drug test during the Tour. The team said Landis would ask for an analysis of his backup sample "to prove either that this result is coming from a natural process or that this is resulting from a mistake."

It wasn't immediately known when the backup sample will be tested, but Phonak manager John Lelangue said the team would ask for that to happen in the next few days.

"He will be fighting ... waiting for the B analysis and then proving to everyone that this can be natural," Lelangue said in a telephone interview.

Arlene Landis said it could take two weeks for the results of the backup test to be made public.

"Of course he wasn't happy about it, but they're spoiling everything he's supposed to be doing right now," she said. "Why couldn't they take care of this before they pronounced him the winner? Lance (Armstrong) went through this too. Somebody doesn't want him to win.

"Why do they put you through two weeks of misery and spoil your crown? My opinion is when he comes on top of this everyone will think so much more of him. So that's what valleys are for, right?"

USA Cycling spokesman Andy Lee said that organization could not comment on the matter until the process is complete. Carla O'Connell, publications and communications director for the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, also had no comment.

UCI spokesman Enrico Carpani said Landis was notified of the test Wednesday morning. He said the cycling body doesn't require analysis of the "B" sample, but that Landis requested it.

"We are confident in the first (test)," Carpani said. "For us, the first one is already good."

"It is obviously distressing," Tour director Christian Prudhomme said at a Paris news conference, stressing the backup test still must be done. Prudhomme said it would be up to the UCI to deretmine penalties.

Under World Anti-Doping Agency regulations, a ratio of testosterone to epitestosterone greater than 4:1 is considered a positive result and subject to investigation. The threshold was recently lowered from 6:1. The most likely natural ratio of testosterone to epitestosterone in humans is 1:1.

Testosterone is included as an anabolic steroid on WADA's list of banned substances, and its use can be punished by a two-year ban.

Testosterone can build muscle and improve recovery time when used over a period of several weeks, said Dr. Gary Wadler, a member of the World Anti-Doping Agency and a spokesman for the American College of Sports Medicine. But if Landis had been a user, his earlier urine tests during the tour would have been affected.

"So something's missing here," Wadler said. "It just doesn't add up."

Landis wrapped up his Tour de France win on Sunday, keeping the title in U.S. hands for the eighth straight year. Armstrong, long dogged by doping whispers and allegations, won the previous seven. Armstrong never has tested positive for drugs and vehemently has denied doping.

Landis' inspiring Tour ride reminded many of fellow American Tyler Hamilton's gritty 2003 performance. Hamilton, riding for team CSC, broke his collarbone on the first day of the Tour but rode on, despite the pain, and finished fourth overall.

But, a year later, Hamilton, then riding for Phonak, tested positive for blood doping at a Spanish race and now is serving a two-year ban. He has denied blood doping.

Speculation that Landis had tested positive spread earlier Thursday after he failed to show up for a one-day race in Denmark on Thursday. A day earlier, he missed a scheduled event in the Netherlands.

On the eve of the Tour's start, nine riders - including pre-race favorites Jan Ullrich and Ivan Basso - were ousted, implicated in a Spanish doping investigation.

The names of Ullrich and Basso turned up on a list of 56 cyclists who allegedly had contact with Spanish doctor Eufemiano Fuentes, who's at the center of the Spanish doping probe. Landis was not implicated in that investigation.

Asked repeatedly what might have tripped his positive test, Landis refused to lay blame on anything in particular. "As to what actually caused it on that particular day, I can only speculate," he said.

Landis said he was still in Europe, but declined to say exactly where. "Not to be elusive, I have to figure out a way to get to the airport and get home."

http://msn.foxsports.com/cycling/story/5822020

MattsMe
07-28-2006, 03:30 PM
Testosterone can build muscle and improve recovery time when used over a period of several weeks, said Dr. Gary Wadler, a member of the World Anti-Doping Agency and a spokesman for the American College of Sports Medicine. But if Landis had been a user, his earlier urine tests during the tour would have been affected.

"So something's missing here," Wadler said. "It just doesn't add up."

This is exactly what I was thinking when I first heard about this. It really doesn't make sense.

SteelerzGirl
07-31-2006, 09:46 AM
Yes, Farmersville, Pa Lancaster County.

Yep, that's correct. Landis is originally from Lancaster County, PA, but now resides in San Diego. His parents are Mennonites.

Shame on Landis if he was doping, but I'm hoping he wasn't.

BlackNGold203
07-31-2006, 10:52 AM
I dunno...I think the French would do ANYTHING to tarnish the Americans...whats this?..like 7 yrs in a row we've won that race?

SteelerzGirl
08-01-2006, 09:09 AM
I heard on DVE on my way to work this morning that it's not looking good for Landis. He had a very high level of synthetic testosterone in his system. :frown:

Jeremy
08-05-2006, 10:49 AM
Landis is a cheater. (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/more/08/05/landis.positive.ap/index.html)

I'm really dissapointed to see this happen. First the world thought Lance cheated and now Landis becomes the first man to ever be stripped of a Tour de France title. Just a sad day in sports.

Ambridge
08-05-2006, 04:33 PM
I have no sympathy for him or anyone of his ilk Barry Bonds!!
You have to be stupid to cheat in the first place because you'll eventually get caught and then you lose any and all credibility.

You get what you deserve.

SteelerzGirl
08-07-2006, 12:03 AM
I have no sympathy for Landis either. I think they should rename the race the Tour de Farce because that's what this race is becoming anymore.

I don't understand why athletes feel they can't compete on their abilities alone. It truly baffles me how they can be satisfied winning knowing they cheated.

Hawk Believer
08-07-2006, 10:20 AM
I am still going to hold out judgement until I hear their appeal arguments and hear what experts have to say.

I have heard a few people who know a lot more than I do about biochem that this result doesn't make any sense. Apparently it should take a while to build up testosterone to the ratio he tested at. He hadn't tested for any abnormality in the previous weeks. And most people say that you can't get a short term benefit from testosterone, you would have to have been taking it a while (there are a few people that speculate that isn't the case though, there is just no data about short term use). And I guess in the performance enhancing cheating world, testosterone is considered a very passe drug that no one has used for over 20 years. It sounds like people in the know would compare it to a present day hacker trying to use a Commodore 64 to do his evil deeds.

So it looks like a lot of things don't add up. I don't have enough knowledge to know if those arguments are outright spin or not. I have read that the test in question is a notorious as being unreliable and the results require subjective interpretation(but apparently his results were really high). People have appealed postive results from this test and wonI also leave open the possibility that someone could have tainted his results, especially after the L'Equipe scandal a year or so ago when they tried to pin a positive doping result on Armstrong by illegally and incorrectly analyzing a 7 year old B sample.

Anyway, the jury is still out on Floyd in my mind. Either way, I hope the evidence is very objective so we aren't left wondering if he really did it or not when all is said and done.

Chronicgaming
08-07-2006, 12:27 PM
People have appealed postive results from this test and wonI also leave open the possibility that someone could have tainted his results, especially after the L'Equipe scandal a year or so ago when they tried to pin a positive doping result on Armstrong by illegally and incorrectly analyzing a 7 year old B sample.

Anyway, the jury is still out on Floyd in my mind. Either way, I hope the evidence is very objective so we aren't left wondering if he really did it or not when all is said and done.
This lab is unreliable in my mind, but with the way cycling is going I'm really not suprised by a new doping charge. It's hard for me to decide if this is another case of an athlete denying charges when the guilt is obvious, or if Landis is getting the shaft from a French agenda. Things aren't looking good for Floyd either way though, since his rep is pretty much ruined. I will wait until the appeals are done and go with that decision (if it is reasonable). It is all very disappointing.

It sounds like people in the know would compare it to a present hacker trying to use a Commodore 64 to do his evil deeds.
Damn, no wonder it takes so long to post to the board... :dang:

SteelerzGirl
08-07-2006, 01:39 PM
I am still going to hold out judgement until I hear their appeal arguments and hear what experts have to say.

I have heard a few people who know a lot more than I do about biochem that this result doesn't make any sense. Apparently it should take a while to build up testosterone to the ratio he tested at. He hadn't tested for any abnormality in the previous weeks. And most people say that you can't get a short term benefit from testosterone, you would have to have been taking it a while (there are a few people that speculate that isn't the case though, there is just no data about short term use). And I guess in the performance enhancing cheating world, testosterone is considered a very passe drug that no one has used for over 20 years. It sounds like people in the know would compare it to a present day hacker trying to use a Commodore 64 to do his evil deeds.

So it looks like a lot of things don't add up. I don't have enough knowledge to know if those arguments are outright spin or not. I have read that the test in question is a notorious as being unreliable and the results require subjective interpretation(but apparently his results were really high). People have appealed postive results from this test and wonI also leave open the possibility that someone could have tainted his results, especially after the L'Equipe scandal a year or so ago when they tried to pin a positive doping result on Armstrong by illegally and incorrectly analyzing a 7 year old B sample.

Anyway, the jury is still out on Floyd in my mind. Either way, I hope the evidence is very objective so we aren't left wondering if he really did it or not when all is said and done.

Some excellent points, Hawk. Landis was on The Today Show this morning for a short segment w/his wife and insists he wasn't doping. I wouldn't put anything past the French either, but who knows. Lies always come out eventually by those who are deceitful, so I'm sure everything will all add up sooner or later. :smile:

Jeremy
08-07-2006, 01:45 PM
I guess the saddest part of the whole story is that it wouldn't be a big surprise if he was doping. We've almost come to expect it here in the US. Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire, Jose Canseco, Justin Gatlin, Marion Jones, etc have shown that Americans are not above cheating to make themselves better. And they don't need it to win. Gatlin was one of the fastest men in the world, but that wasn't enough. Barry Bonds was one of the greatest baseball players the world has ever known, but that wasn't enough. So maybe all these athletes can answer one simple question for me.

When is it enough?

Hawk Believer
08-07-2006, 02:12 PM
Agreed. I believe that one of the biggest tragedies of modern sport is the fact that any person who does anything extraordinary in the field of athletics will always be dogged by the accusation of cheating. Achievments that used to inspire all of us to do more with our lives may now merely inspire cynicism. Especially in people who were rooting against the winner. And as Lance Armstrong's case demonstrates, even though people may not be able to prove you did cheat, you can't ever truly prove that you didn't.

SteelerzGirl
08-07-2006, 02:14 PM
Exactly, Hawk, and not being able to prove that you didn't cheat in those instances is what can ruin an athlete's reputation and/or career.

83-Steelers-43
11-16-2006, 08:50 AM
Report: Lab in Landis case made 'administrative error' on 'B' sample
Associated Press
Cycling News Wire

PARIS -- The French anti-doping lab that tested American
cyclist Floyd Landis' urine samples made an "administrative
error" when reporting its findings on his backup "B" sample, the
French newspaper Le Monde reported Wednesday.

The newspaper cited unnamed sources as saying the
Chatenay-Malabry laboratory gave the wrong number in its report
about Landis' second sample. Tests on the rider's two samples
indicated that Landis had elevated levels of testosterone in his
system when he won the Tour de France in July.

In its report, the lab wrote that the "B" sample tested was
number 994,474, while the actual number was 995,474, Le Monde said.

"The error, of an administrative nature, does not mean the
positive B sample was not that of the American," Le Monde said.
"But it is being used today by his lawyers ... to contest his
positive doping results."

The lab referred questions to the French anti-doping agency,
when contacted Wednesday by The Associated Press. Its secretary
general, Philippe Dautry, said the agency had no official comment
and that it was not for him to say whether an error had occurred
with the sample's number. He said the agency would respond when
Landis' case is heard.

Landis' attorney, Howard Jacobs, has already alleged that the
French lab made repeated errors in its analyses, including
mismatched sample code numbers.

In a letter sent to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency in September,
Jacobs said the positive finding on the "B" sample came from a
sample number not assigned to Landis.

"It's incredibly sloppy," Jacobs said at the time. "It has to
make you wonder about the accuracy of the work."

On Sunday, Landis said in a French television interview that the
lab made crucial errors in his tests.

"Even the best people make mistakes," he said. "I can't say
that the lab is always a bad lab, but I can say that in this case
it made some mistakes ... I did not take testosterone."

Le Monde's report came a day after French authorities said they
are investigating a complaint that hackers stole data from
computers at the same lab in an attempt to discredit the lab's
credibility.

Tour de France organizers no longer consider Landis the Tour
champion. He will contest the test results at an arbitration
hearing in the United States. If found guilty of doping, he would
be formally stripped of the title and face a two-year ban.

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=cycling&id=2662735

Hawk Believer
11-16-2006, 11:38 AM
Interesting update. It seemed there were a lot of things that didn't add up in this case. Should be interesting to see if this is enough to overturn the results. Hard to tell if this is evidence there was tampering or of the sample was mislabeled accidently. I think by a US legal system standard, this would be enough to overturn the case. But I don't know how the cycling appeal process works.

83-Steelers-43
09-20-2007, 01:42 PM
Landis banned two years for doping, must forfeit Tour title

PARIS -- Floyd Landis lost his expensive and explosive doping case Thursday when the arbitrators upheld the results of a test that showed the 2006 Tour de France champion used synthetic testosterone to fuel his spectacular comeback victory, The Associated Press has learned.

The decision means Landis, who repeatedly has denied using performance-enhancing drugs, must forfeit his Tour de France title and is subject to a two-year ban.

http://sports.espn.go.com/oly/cycling/news/story?id=3029089

revefsreleets
09-20-2007, 05:00 PM
Wow. This is an old thread. There have been several articles about the Tour lately, and it's pretty much accepted now that just about every cyclist is doping or juicing or transfusing blood (Their own or others). Sponsors are pulling out left and right. This sport is probably on it's last legs.