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BlackNGold203
08-12-2006, 07:20 PM
MOSCOW -- Evgeni Malkin, the Pittsburgh Penguins' No. 1 pick in 2004, has fled from his Russian club Metallurg Magnitogorsk days after agreeing on a new contract, local media reported Saturday.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2547782

Jeremy
08-12-2006, 07:30 PM
How does this help him?

83-Steelers-43
08-12-2006, 07:44 PM
How did it help other Russian born hockey players who snuck out of that messed up country?

Example: Alexander Mogilny

83-Steelers-43
08-12-2006, 07:53 PM
http://www.wild.com/assets/fans/Gump.jpg RUN MALKIN, RUN!!!

BlackNGold203
08-12-2006, 08:26 PM
http://www.wild.com/assets/fans/Gump.jpg RUN MALKIN, RUN!!!

ROTFLMAO

:sofunny: :sofunny: :sofunny: :sofunny:

83-Steelers-43
08-13-2006, 06:39 AM
Penguins' prospect Malkin skips out in Finland
Leaves Russian pro team
Sunday, August 13, 2006

By Alan Robinson, The Associated Press



Evgeni Malkin, the star forward and Penguins draft pick who has said repeatedly he wants to play in the NHL, left his Russian pro team during a training camp in Finland yesterday, various Russian news services reported.


It was uncertain whether Malkin bolted from the team in an attempt to get to North America and play for the Penguins this season, but the Itar-Tass news agency, citing a source within the club, reported Malkin took his belongings and passport with him.


Malkin's departure from Metallurg Magnitogorsk of Russia's Super League would be yet another unexpected turn in an ever-changing story in which the Olympics star renegotiated his Russian contract from two seasons to one season last week, at the same time his North American-based agents were saying he wants to play in the NHL as soon as possible.


Malkin's agent, JP Barry, didn't immediately return a phone message. Penguins spokesman Tom McMillan said the club had no comment on the report.


In another curious twist, the Russian daily newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda reported last week that Malkin recently opened a new restaurant in Magnitogorsk designed to resemble a Russian jail, complete with bars on the windows, aluminum forks, waitresses in striped prison garb and portraits of Soviet dictators. Malkin was quoted as saying he wanted to open similar restaurants in other Russian cities.


Malkin was the No. 2 pick in the 2004 draft behind last year's NHL rookie of the year, fellow Russian Alexander Ovechkin of the Washington Capitals. But he did not play in the NHL last season because the league lacked a transfer agreement with the Russian ice hockey federation.


This spring, it appeared Russia would go along with a transfer agreement already reached with the main European ice hockey federations and the International Ice Hockey Federation calling for a $200,000 transfer fee paid to each country when one of its players left for the NHL. But, apparently because the Mettalurg team felt Malkin's rights were worth 10 times that amount, Russia has not signed the agreement.


However, Malkin's former agent, Don Meehan, said Russian law allowed Malkin to leave his team -- despite having a signed contract -- merely by submitting a letter of resignation. Malkin, under heavy pressure to stay with his Russian team, presumably may have renegotiated his contract last weekend merely to buy time before deciding the best course to get to the NHL this season.


Barry told The Associated Press last week that, despite Russian news agency reports of the reworked contract, Malkin had every intention of trying to play for the Penguins soon. Barry and Pat Brisson were Malkin's agents until June, when Meehan took over, but have since been rehired by Malkin. They did not play any role in his Russian contract talks.


The 6-foot-3 Malkin is widely regarded in hockey circles as being the best player in the world not playing in the NHL. The Penguins badly want Malkin to join a youthful team that already includes Sidney Crosby, who had 102 points last season as an 18-year-old rookie, and Jordan Staal, the No. 2 pick in the recent NHL draft.


Malkin led Metallurg with 47 points, including 21 goals, in 46 games last season. He had goals and six points for Russia in the Turin Olympics.


If Malkin is attempting to defect while in Finland, he would be the best-known hockey player to do so since Alexander Mogilny left the Soviet Union team following the world junior championships in Sweden in 1989 and defected to the United States so he could play for the Buffalo Sabres.


If Malkin does intend to play for the Penguins this season, his contract negotiations likely would go quickly. Under the NHL labor agreement, he would make slightly less than $1 million in salary, plus bonuses that would be negotiated with the team.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06225/713218-61.stm

83-Steelers-43
08-13-2006, 04:27 PM
It's official, we pissed off the Russians....lol.

MOSCOW -- Russia's Metallurg Magnitogorsk will go to court to seek compensation from the Pittsburgh Penguins after the sudden disappearance of their best player, Evgeni Malkin, the Superleague club's head said on Sunday.

"They all like to talk about democracy, the American way and then they shamelessly steal our best players. This is pure sports terrorism." Gennady Velichkin, Metallurg Magnitogorsk general director


"We're all in shock," Gennady Velichkin said after Malkin, Pittsburgh's No. 1 pick in 2004, secretly fled Metallurg's training camp in Finland on Saturday just days after agreeing to a new contract with the club.

"The players, coaching staff are also very upset because for four days Malkin was training with the team and suddenly he is gone without saying a word to anyone," he told Reuters in a telephone interview.

Last week, Metallurg said that Malkin had annulled his previous contract with the club, which would have kept him in Magnitogorsk through April 2008. Instead, he had signed a new one-year deal after which he would become a free agent.

But the young Russian, who turned 20 two weeks ago, has always stated his desire to play in the National Hockey League, saying he wanted to prove himself at a higher level.

Velichkin blamed Malkin's American agents and his NHL club for stealing Russia's best players.

"They all like to talk about democracy, the American way and then they shamelessly steal our best players. This is pure sports terrorism," said the Metallurg general director.

"Don't forget, Malkin is a young kid, he is still very naive and it was easy for them to get into his head all that stuff about the American dream and how great the NHL is," he added.

"The Pittsburgh owners are trying hard to sell the club, and the price would be totally different if they had Malkin.

"But you can't just take our best players and expect to get away with it."

The talented center, who has been compared with Pittsburgh owner, the great Mario Lemieux, has been the most sought-after player by the NHL this year.

Pittsburgh drafted Malkin second overall in 2004 behind fellow Russian Alexander Ovechkin, who took the NHL by storm last season, winning the Calder Trophy as the best rookie.

Velichkin said the fact that Russia has refused to sign a transfer deal with the NHL would not prevent his club from going to court in the United States to seek compensation for Malkin.

Russia remained the only major hockey nation not to sign the deal, which was approved by the International Ice Hockey Federation in 2005.

"We've put so much effort, resources and money into Malkin's development as a player.

He was our gold diamond, our prize possession. He had a contract with us, we were building the whole team around him and now he is gone," Velichkin said.

"But don't think we'll just sit there and do nothing. We'll go to court to get what we believe is proper compensation."

Under the transfer deal Magnitogorsk would have received a basic $200,000 fee for Malkin while Metallurg reportedly wanted at least 10 times more.

Velichkin declined to specify the sum he was seeking for Malkin, pointing to similar deals involving soccer players.

"In soccer, a fee for a player of Malkin's caliber would be into tens of millions of dollars," he said. "He is a franchise player and we won't be satisfied with anything less."

http://tsn.ca/nhl/news_story/?ID=174134&hubname=nhl

http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2548273

83-Steelers-43
08-13-2006, 04:30 PM
"They all like to talk about democracy, the American way and then they shamelessly steal our best players. This is pure sports terrorism." Gennady Velichkin, Metallurg Magnitogorsk general director

This is typical.....

Isn't democracy letting people leave the country whenever they feel like it? This kid has stated on many occasions that he wanted to come to the states and play in the NHL.

Velichkin = Jackass

BlackNGold203
08-13-2006, 05:22 PM
"They all like to talk about democracy, the American way and then they shamelessly steal our best players. This is pure sports terrorism." Gennady Velichkin, Metallurg Magnitogorsk general director

This is typical.....

Isn't democracy letting people leave the country whenever they feel like it? This kid has stated on many occasions that he wanted to come to the states and play in the NHL.

Velichkin = Jackass


Malkin = Penguin

:cool: :cool: :cool:

83-Steelers-43
08-13-2006, 07:34 PM
I think the Penguins took my advice about sending in a Special Ops force headed by Sid.......I'll be damned.

BlackNGold203
08-13-2006, 07:59 PM
I think the Penguins took my advice about sending in a Special Ops force headed by Sid.......I'll be damned.

:sofunny: :sofunny: :sofunny:

*pictures that baby faced kid in camo.....*

:sofunny: :sofunny:

Jeremy
08-13-2006, 08:02 PM
Sports terrorism?

Someone needs to tell people that the word terrorism has lost all of it's meaning now that it's being used every 5 minutes on Fox News.

BlackNGold203
08-13-2006, 08:12 PM
Sports terrorism?

Someone needs to tell people that the word terrorism has lost all of it's meaning now that it's being used every 5 minutes on Fox News.


true dat.....:cool: :cool:

X-Terminator
08-14-2006, 09:16 AM
This story just gets more bizarre every day. I really do feel for the kid, especially since now his family could very well be at the mercy of the Russian mafia. If he is coming over here and signs a contract, he needs to get them out of the country ASAP.

BlackNGold203
08-14-2006, 09:21 AM
This story just gets more bizarre every day. I really do feel for the kid, especially since now his family could very well be at the mercy of the Russian mafia. If he is coming over here and signs a contract, he needs to get them out of the country ASAP.

Good point X-T...this isnt being handled well at all....and things may get stranger before they get better....

83-Steelers-43
08-14-2006, 09:29 AM
I'm not really buying into the Russian mafia theory. I've heard it thrown around a good bit in this city since the Malkin saga began and I just think that's way out there. If that was the case; meaning Malkin could choose to play in Russia or defect and have his family tortured and killed I would have to believe Malkin would choose to stay in Russia.

On that note, I can't name one Russian hockey player in recent memory who hasn’t come to the NHL given opportunity. I don’t recall Mrs. Bure, Mrs. Fedorov, Mrs. Mogilny or Mrs. Kovalev being whacked on a street corner in downtown Moscow.

If anything, I feel it was direct pressure from the Russian hockey federation. He's a young kid. Inside a country which is not exactly the poster child of democracy. Did not exactly want to leave his homeland on bad terms but the Russian hockey federation pushed him to that edge and he jumped.

X-Terminator
08-14-2006, 09:42 AM
I'm not really buying into the Russian mafia theory. I've heard it thrown around a good bit in this city since the Malkin saga began and I just think that's way out there. If that was the case; meaning Malkin could choose to play in Russia or defect and have his family tortured and killed I would have to believe Malkin would choose to stay in Russia.

On that note, I can't name one Russian hockey player in recent memory who hasn’t come to the NHL given opportunity. I don’t recall Mrs. Bure, Mrs. Fedorov, Mrs. Mogilny or Mrs. Kovalev being whacked on a street corner in downtown Moscow.

If anything, I feel it was direct pressure from the Russian hockey federation. He's a young kid. Inside a country which is not exactly the poster child of democracy. Did not exactly want to leave his homeland on bad terms but the Russian hockey federation pushed him to that edge and he jumped.

It's actually a fact that the Russian mafia controls the Russian Superleague and pretty much everything else over there. There's also been speculation that Velichkin himself has ties to them. Now they may not harm his family, but they likely are the driving force behind this - plus, if you're Malkin, do you really want to take the chance that they MIGHT threaten them or pressure them? That's why he needs to get them out of the country. Do you recall Ovechkin having this much trouble last season when he came over here? He was in the same situation as Malkin - had a couple years left on his contract with his RSL team, turned in his resignation and then signed with the Caps. There wasn't anywhere near this much drama involved with him, other than his RSL team attempting to sue the NHL and it getting thrown out of court. Why now is Malkin having so much trouble? Answer: GREED.

83-Steelers-43
08-14-2006, 09:47 AM
I'm not denying the Russia mob has it's hand inside pockets. But I don't believe it's on the level that some may think. Normally when this topic comes up people automatically feel Mr. and Mrs. Malkin are going to get whacked while shopping for groceries on a sunny Sunday afternoon if Malkin decided to defect and play with the Penguins.

In my opinion, this decision came down to one person. Malkin. He made it and with the exception of the relations between Russia and North America becoming more strained when it comes to hockey, I don't see the whacking of Malkin or his family members in the near future. In fact, I see Mrs. Malkin wearing nice fur coats and drinking the best vodka the world has to offer in the near future.

HometownGal
08-14-2006, 10:10 AM
The ghost of Ronnie on Malkin's MIA status....

http://www.senorcafe.com/archives/RWR.jpg

Jeremy
08-14-2006, 11:45 AM
Don't underestimate the power of the Russian Mafia. The Redfellas are much smarter and more ruthless than La Cosa Nostra ever was or will be. There probably isn't much chance that his mother or family will be murdered. But the threat of violence is more than enough to convince him to pay, say 10%, of his salary to the Redfellas to ensure their saftey.

83-Steelers-43
08-14-2006, 11:58 AM
Don't underestimate the power of the Russian Mafia. The Redfellas are much smarter and more ruthless than La Cosa Nostra ever was or will be.


Not to take this off topic...

More ruthless? Sure. They will kill your family members (wife and kids). Smarter? I disagree. LCN to this day is more organized not only in the states but throughout the globe compared to the Russian mob and I'm willing to bet they pull in more cash on yearly basis. The Russian is mob large and powerful, but they are not on the same level as LCN.

Also, by no means am I underestimating them. I just don't recall other NHL players parents being killed or beaten up nor have I heard any type of evidence stating that Malkin or his family have been threatened.

Jeremy
08-14-2006, 12:43 PM
LCN to this day is more organized not only in the states but throughout the globe compared to the Russian mob and I'm willing to bet they pull in more cash on yearly basis.

Most people who work in law enforcement and deal with organized crime will tell you that the Redfellas are far and away smarter than La Cosa Nostra ever was or will be.

83-Steelers-43
08-14-2006, 12:46 PM
LCN to this day is more organized not only in the states but throughout the globe compared to the Russian mob and I'm willing to bet they pull in more cash on yearly basis.

Most people who work in law enforcement and deal with organized crime will tell you that the Redfellas are far and away smarter than La Cosa Nostra ever was or will be.

After reading many books on both parties, I'd like to sit down and have a talk with them....lol.

83-Steelers-43
08-15-2006, 03:48 PM
Is this what Velichkin meant by democracy? :rolleyes:

Malkin's parents say he was pressured in Russia
Tuesday, August 15, 2006

By Chuck Finder, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette



The foreign intrigue surrounding Evgeni Malkin grew so cloak-and-dagger yesterday that even Interpol was invoked by one of the parties.

It was a day when the Penguins prospect's father talked openly about how his son "snapped." A day when his mother and others portrayed him as a troubled young man pressured into making a 3 a.m. deal with his Russian team a week ago. A day when Penguins defenseman Sergei Gonchar compared the kid's flight to the Iron Curtain defections of Alexander Mogilny and Sergei Fedorov a decade and a half earlier. A day when the Metallurg Magnitogorsk general director accused the Penguins and the NHL of crimes against the hockey world, calling this "the theft of the century," even with 94 years still to go.

And this was only Day 3 of The Heck with Carmen Sandiego, Where In the World is Evgeni Malkin?

Speaking of his whereabouts, speculation has centered upon Toronto, where his agents, Pat Brisson and J.P. Barry, have an auxiliary office and where one Russian tabloid reported that a fellow resembling Malkin had been spotted. Reportedly, station MTV3 in Finland, where Metallurg is playing in a tournament, quoted a tournament official yesterday as saying that Malkin left Helsinki-Vantaa airport on a plane Saturday bound for New York.

What remains certain is that Malkin, who turned 20 on July 31, left Metallurg behind Saturday at an airport in Finland, where the team began training, and likely headed to North America to commence his legal march toward the Penguins. Conceivably, he could hunker in seclusion for a two-week wait, the mandatory period in Russian law under which he can inform his employers he is leaving.

"I can tell you I think he is safe, but I cannot comment on anything else," agent Brisson told The Associated Press.

Gennady Velichkin, the Metallurg team boss, certainly didn't hesitate to comment. He told Soviet Sport:

"How am I supposed to look for him? What, am I supposed to ask Interpol to look for him? Is it not clear that Evgeni left for America at the invitation of the people overseas? The Americans' arrogance is beyond any bounds. This is the theft of the century. They don't care that Malkin is Russia's national treasure.

"We must sue not only Pittsburgh but the entire National Hockey League and its whole arrogance. The NHL must receive a total condemnation from the entire sporting world. Let's get back to the question of the compensation. ... Money is not most important for us. The most important [aspect] for us is to get a precedent and win the case."

However, in the case of players who reached American soil, such as Ovechkin and Columbus' Nikolai Zherdev, the legal maneuvering by Russian hockey authorities held no sway in U.S. courts. However, Malkin, unlike in those cases, has a new contract in place. The circumstances under which he agreed to that deal, though, remain in debate.

He signed last week in the early hours of the morning, after a plea from the Metallurg corporation president, Viktor Rashnikov, if not from others in a sport long influenced across Russia by the mafia there. "He simply wanted to play in the NHL," Natalia Malkin told the Sport Gazeta. "But the management of Metallurg played on his patriotic feelings. He was not able to refuse." After that Godfather-esque comment, Malkin's mother added that her son left for Finland "very disgruntled." She continued, without specifying who, "I still feel that others used my son for their purposes."

Malkin's father, Vladimir, told Komsomolskaya Pravda: "My son simply snapped, his nerves did not hold on. In the last moment, they persuaded him to stay in Magnitka, though his mind was already in the NHL. I understand him, but I don't support him. It was a childish act. Before I give my final assessment, I need to talk to him personally." The parents said they've tried to contact him, but his cellular phone is turned off.

NHL vice president Bill Daly, in an e-mail interview yesterday, intimated about Malkin's one-year Metallurg contract -- hastily negotiated down from his previous two-year deal -- when he said, "The days of involuntary servitude are behind us. We certainly respect the player's ability to make personal choices consistent with his rights and obligations under applicable law. And it certainly doesn't surprise us that he wants to play in the NHL. At the end of the day, players are going to play where they want to play."

Daly added that this Malkin matter might lead to Russia at last agreeing to the NHL's transfer agreement with the International Ice Hockey Federation, whose president, Rene Fasel, spoke with Daly by telephone yesterday.

"We did discuss Malkin among a host of other things," Daly wrote. "We are hopeful that, in light of what has transpired, it may create an opportunity to sit down at an early date and negotiate the terms of a new Player Transfer Agreement that the Russians will participate in."

The Russians refused to sign the past two contracts mostly because many of them believed a player of Malkin's ability would be worth more than $200,000 that the current agreement stipulates.

So continued a topsy-turvy week for Malkin. First, his then-agent, Don Meehan, expressed his client's desires to play for the Penguins this season. Then Malkin fired Meehan, who represented him for barely two months. Then he signed that early morning deal with Metallurg. Then he rehired Brisson and Barry. Then he fled Finland, passports and personal belongings in tow.

"You know what, there'd be lots to say, but I don't think it would really be my place," Meehan said yesterday by phone from his suburban-Toronto office. "If you wanted to get an update on the process, you'd be better off talking to Mr. Barry and Mr. Brisson."

Neither returned calls from the Post-Gazette, though Barry's Calgary office reported that he was "on vacation." Penguins officials continued to decline comment.

Gonchar, a lockout teammate of Malkin's in Magnitogorsk two years ago and on the Russian Olympic team in February, told the Sport Express while summering in St. Petersburg: "It appears the times have changed [since Mogilny and Fedorov defected in 1991], but they haven't changed enough. Otherwise, why would Evgeni do the same thing? It's his right, which all of us have. ... It seems strange that he signed his contract with Metallurg at 3 o'clock in the morning. As far as I know, documents like these don't get signed at such a time. So judging by these rumors, the player has reasons to do what he did."

Perhaps the most reasoned response came from the legendary goaltender who heads the Russian Hockey Federation, Vladislav Tretiak: "Why did things need to end up in a scandal?"

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06227/713590-61.stm

83-Steelers-43
08-16-2006, 07:14 AM
Location of Penguins prospect Malkin is a big secret
Iron curtain of secrecy, new twist in plot worthy of Tolstoy
Wednesday, August 16, 2006

By Robert Dvorchak, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


The information legs of the Malkin Mystery, a non-fiction Russian novel set not in the fierce winter but the stupor of August, disappeared into minutia and speculation yesterday. The only version that counts now is buried in secrecy with the secret inner circle -- the capitalist agents and the prized talent.

Not exactly War And Peace or War? What Is It Good For? or even a decent Rocky and Bullwinkle series -- but the age of instant information demands instant gratification, and nobody has heard from the inner circle, which all of a sudden quit answering their cell phones and haven't bothered to update. Oh, and there is the involvement of money, the root of all evil even in the days of ethics. Add the threats of using the all-American outlet of legal action vowed by an aggrieved hockey concern -- Metallurg Magnitogorsk translates into Steelers -- which feels like it should get more money. The Cold War officially is over. Russians demand their share of the fruits of free-market freedoms. Truth was the first casualty and the last casualty.

So the thin thread of information that began to explode Saturday, gleaned from phone interviews with people with knowledge and web sites carrying snippets of detail, demands a fitting climax. This is the Information Age, where the lack of reliable facts pains liked a sprained ankle on a beach vacation. This much is known:

He is safe with his agents, completely secluded behind a wall of silence. There's a two-week timetable that will feel like the eternity of the Russian winter as it plays out, exhausting those who endure it because people want to know. Except it's August.

He had a Canadian visa in his passport before he left for training camp, and he's most likely squirreled away in Toronto where his agents, despite reports from the Calgary office about a vacation, can only let him skate in secret for so long before words leaks out.

From the Penguins' point of view -- and they could teach the State Department tips on avoiding involvement in a slippery situation by the way they've washed their hands of it -- Malkin provides a topnotch center behind Sidney Crosby. He almost surely will make them a better team, and his presence might give them an outside shot at a playoff spot.

This complex plot is set against a backdrop of a franchise for sale and in need of resolution to an arena issue. But no Russian team that lost a player through defection or contractual maneuvering has won court attempts to get the players back, either.

Where's Anton Chekhov, Woodward and Bernstein when you need them?

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06228/713823-61.stm

BlackNGold203
08-16-2006, 07:20 AM
And the saga continues.....

:cool: :cool:

X-Terminator
08-16-2006, 09:27 AM
Man...you sure this isn't coming out of Hollywood or something? I haven't seen this much drama surrounding an NHL player since Alexander Mogilny...

Petesburgh66
08-16-2006, 03:13 PM
http://www.tsn.ca/nhl/news_story/?ID=174392&hubname=

Malkin files resignation with Russian club

Evgeni Malkin has officially sent his resignation to Metallurg Magnitogorsk, TSN has confirmed.

Malkin has been at the center of a huge international storm since leaving his Russian team on the weekend.

Mettallurg Magnitogorsk coach Dave King told the FAN 590 in Toronto on Wednesday morning that a fax was received by the team that indicated Malkin was exercising his "two-week window rights" to re-sign. Russian law allows any employee to leave an employer, even while under contract, simply by giving two weeks notice.

King said he did not know where Malkin was, but speculated that he was staying with Washington Capitals star Alexander Ovechkin somewhere in the United States. Ovechkin, however, is in Toronto and told TSN he had not spoken to Malkin in a couple of weeks.

"Everyone wants to be in the best place, in the best league," Ovechkin told TSN. "It's his decision. I don't know if he's right or wrong, but it's his decision."

Malkin's agents have only said that their client is safe.

Sources told TSN that Malkin is not in Toronto, but is stationed at an undisclosed location in the United States.

TSN has confirmed that Malkin, through his representation, has indeed served notice that he will not be returning, and provided Metallurg Magnitogorsk the obligatory two week notification required in writing under Russian labour law. This process took place quickly following his departure from the team on Saturday.

Malkin is said to be rattled by this cloak and dagger saga and wants for nothing other than the opportunity to play in the National Hockey League and to put the nastiness of this battle behind him and his family.

"It's not his fault, he didn't ask for this", a source close to the situation told TSN. "He was ready to play (in the NHL) last year. This is what he wants."

The next chapter in this mystery is equally guarded, however the source adds that the next 24 hours may offer more insight into Malkin's next move.

What is clear is the enormous pressure the Russian Federation is feeling now that the leverage they had with Malkin in an ongoing tug-of-war with the IIHF and the NHL is quickly vanishing.

It is hoped Malkin's fight to join the NHL will encourage Russia to fall into line with the other international hockey federations currently guided by the existing transfer agreement, thus avoiding the inevitability of other young, talented Russian players from following a similar path.

The resignation strategy Malkin has employed is one that no Russian hockey player had used until Alexei Mikhnov, an Edmonton Oilers prospect, gave his written notice to Russian club Yaroslavl on June 30. That situation, however, also remains unresolved. Yaroslavl could still attempt to prevent Mikhnov from leaving Russia, or it could take legal action against the Oilers to block him from making the move.

"All we know is Mikhnov gave his notice to leave his club team and the two-week period expired," Oilers assistant GM Scott Howson told the Edmonton Journal last week. Howson also told the Journal that Mikhnov's agent was, in fact, negotiating a contract with the Oilers.

Malkin seems a long way from getting to that step.

Penguins star Sergei Gonchar told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review that he spoke to Malkin a week ago, just before Malkin disappeared while Metallurg Magnitogorsk was training in Finland. Gonchar noted that Malkin sounded disappointed about having signed to stay with Metallurg Magnitogorsk.

"He was very upset," Gonchar told the Tribune-Review, noting that there must have been a lot of pressure on the youngster to re-sign with his Russian team - maybe too much pressure.

"It's a different country than it used to be," Gonchar told the Times-Review. "Hopefully, nobody is going to put pressure on his family or himself when he comes back. But at the same time, there's got to be some pressure because otherwise a guy wouldn't sign a deal at 3 a.m. then disappear in a couple days.

"I'm assuming he's in the United States or some other country where he can wait."

Russian national team coach Vyacheslav Bykov has already told the Russian newspaper Sport-Express that Malkin would still be welcome to play for his country.

83-Steelers-43
08-16-2006, 03:28 PM
He's getting closer. I'll be content when I see him on the ice this season, inside Mellon Arena and sporting a Penguin jersey.

BlackNGold203
08-16-2006, 04:00 PM
He'll be there......

83-Steelers-43
08-17-2006, 06:39 PM
It has been confirmed by Savern that Malkin is now in Los Angeles.

BlackNGold203
08-17-2006, 10:17 PM
Malkin comes out of hiding, practices in L.A.

Evgeni Malkin has surfaced.


ESPN The Magazine E.J. Hradek reports the Pittsburgh Penguins prospect turned up in Los Angeles on Thursday, less than a week after Malkin abruptly left his home country of Russia and his Metallurg Magnitogorsk team.


Malkin skated with a group of NHL players, including Rob Blake and Mathieu Schneider, at the Kings' practice facility in El Segundo, Calif.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2552761

:cool: :cool:

X-Terminator
08-18-2006, 08:15 AM
That is good news, though I'm sure he's watched 24/7. Now all that's left is to get him signed and into a Pens uniform :cool:

83-Steelers-43
08-19-2006, 07:09 AM
Malkin's second guess led to his flight to U.S.
Regretted Russian signing under psychological pressure
Saturday, August 19, 2006

By Robert Dvorchak, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette



Russian hockey sensation Evgeni Malkin said he second-guessed himself just hours after he signed a new contract with his hometown team two weeks ago, triggering a chain of events that led to a clandestine escape to Los Angeles so he could play in the NHL with the Penguins.

Granting a select set of interviews yesterday through his agents at IMG Hockey in Los Angeles, the 20-year-old Malkin made his first public statements about an intrigue-filled flight that has rankled Russian officials and raised expectations with Pittsburgh hockey fans.

While he speaks no English, Malkin made his comments to interpreter Slava Malamud, a correspondent with the Moscow-based Sport Express who interviewed him at IMG offices.

Malkin wanted all along to play for the Penguins this season and said he was advised by his agent, J.P. Barry of IMG, not to sign a reworked deal with Metallurg Magnitogorsk of the Russian Super League. But, when team officials came to his house two weeks ago and with his parents present, he signed a one-year deal at 3 a.m. after what was described as nonstop pressure.

"The next morning when I woke up, I called Mr. Barry and asked him to help," Malkin told Malamud. "I was pressured very hard. I kept asking them, 'Why aren't you keeping your promise to let me play in America?' They did not want to listen. They just kept on with their arguments."

Malkin's version of events since that signing are consistent with what his agents had told various news outlets: He went to a training site in Finland with the Metallurg team, which had held his passport. He kept the passport after entering Finland and, last Saturday, bolted the team to stay in a secret apartment with Barry and one of his associates in Helsinki. He interviewed for a visa application with the U.S. Embassy Monday and departed for Los Angeles the next day after the visa was approved.

Although Malkin said he never received any specific physical threats, he said Metallurg general director Gennady Velichkin applied psychological pressure because the team wanted his services for another year.

At the root of the international incident is the lack of a transfer agreement between the Russian Ice Hockey Federation and the NHL. The Russians agreed in principle to an agreement that would pay a $200,000 fee for a player who goes to the NHL, but they failed to sign it by the July 31 deadline, which coincidentally was Malkin's birthday.

Malkin said he was told last year that he would be free to go to the Penguins, but he felt he was being used as leverage by Velichkin to produce better terms. Metallurg officials believe that proper compensation would be in the millions of dollars.

"I'm very hurt. You cannot treat people like that. They promised me last year I would be free," Malkin told Malamud. "Now it turns out they're not going to keep their word while I am supposed to."

In the meantime, Malkin has given two-weeks' notice to Metallurg, which under Russian labor law would free him from his obligations. An incensed Velichkin, who has accused the Penguins of "sports terrorism" by stealing his star player, has said he will sue to keep his property. Other Russian players who bolted for the NHL have won their cases.

There is no word on when Malkin will travel to Pittsburgh, but he expects to be in camp when rookies report in early September.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06231/714741-61.stm

BlackNGold203
08-19-2006, 07:29 AM
* 32 seconds left on the man advantage....Armstrong...back to the point to Gonchar...SLAPSHOT!!....SAVE Brodeur!!!....rebound...Crosby...cross ice pass to Malkin!!!....HE SHOOTS AND SCOOOORRREEESSS!!!!!*


Get in the fast lane Grandma!!..the bingo game's ready to roll!!!!!!

83-Steelers-43
08-19-2006, 07:36 AM
Velichkin's comments:

"They all like to talk about democracy, the American way and then they shamelessly steal our best players. This is pure sports terrorism."

"Don't forget, Malkin is a young kid, he is still very naive and it was easy for them to get into his head all that stuff about the American dream and how great the NHL is,"

Malkin's comments:

"The next morning when I woke up, I called Mr. Barry and asked him to help,", "I was pressured very hard. I kept asking them, 'Why aren't you keeping your promise to let me play in America?' They did not want to listen. They just kept on with their arguments."

"I'm very hurt. You cannot treat people like that. They promised me last year I would be free,". "Now it turns out they're not going to keep their word while I am supposed to."

And on that note..........God Bless American.

X-Terminator
08-21-2006, 10:25 AM
Now that he's in LA, the next step is to get him signed and into rookie camp. But more importantly, I hope that this entire saga has ended, and that Malkin can just focus on doing what he does best - playing hockey.

83-Steelers-43
08-22-2006, 06:46 AM
Agent: Malkin looking to opener

By The Associated Press
Tuesday, August 22, 2006


EL SEGUNDO, Calif. - Evgeni Malkin skated again with several NHL players Monday at the Los Angeles Kings' practice rink, and his agent said he was optimistic the 20-year-old hockey star will soon become a member of the Pittsburgh Penguins.

"This is why we're here," Pat Brisson said. "We're going to do everything in our power to help him reach his goal — to be playing with the Penguins on opening night."

Malkin, considered one of the best players in the world not playing in the NHL, left his Russian Super League team earlier this month during its training camp in Helsinki, Finland, because of his desire to join the Penguins.

"He wants to follow his dream, he wants to play in the NHL," Brisson said, adding Malkin is in good hockey shape and was skating Monday for the third time since arriving in the Los Angeles area last Wednesday.

Brisson said he hasn't discussed a contract with the Penguins yet.

"Once we decide it's the right time to move forward, it shouldn't be a problem," the agent said. "He could be here another 10 days."

Malkin did not speak with reporters Monday.

"Due to the legality and the situation we're in, it's a little sensitive," Brisson said.

Brisson works for Creative Artists Agency, which represents about 60 NHL players. He is working with lawyers to determine when Malkin can join the Penguins, who made him the second overall selection in the 2004 NHL draft.

Within hours of Malkin leaving his team, his agents faxed a letter of resignation to the Metallurg team. Under Russian law, Malkin can quit his job by giving two weeks' notice, even if he is under contract.

Once the two-week period is up, it is believed Malkin can sign an entry-level, three-year contract with the Penguins that could be worth close to $1 million a year, plus as much as $2.8 million a year in incentives.

Penguins general manager Ray Shero issued a statement last Thursday saying the team looks forward to meeting with Malkin and his representatives "to discuss what can be a very bright future with the Pittsburgh Penguins."

The NHL has not publicly stated any support for Malkin, but deputy commissioner Bill Daly has said the league believes any player should have the right to choose where he wants to play as long as he is legally free to do so.

Brisson said Malkin went to the beach Sunday, and will work out Tuesday and Thursday with T.R. Goodman, a personal trainer who trains most of the NHL players represented by CAA.

"He's here to work, acclimate himself," Brisson said.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/penguins/s_467120.html

83-Steelers-43
08-22-2006, 07:04 AM
Just pay the Russians the what? $200,000 that they originally agreed upon and get this kid signed up and ready to go.

The Russians planning on suing the Penguin organization is comical. How would that hold up in court exactly? What did the Penguins do? Since Malkin left Russia I've been sitting here trying to figure out how exactly the Russians would put a case together in order to successfully sue the Penguins.

X-Terminator
08-22-2006, 08:43 AM
Just pay the Russians the what? $200,000 that they originally agreed upon and get this kid signed up and ready to go.

The Russians planning on suing the Penguin organization is comical. How would that hold up in court exactly? What did the Penguins do? Since Malkin left Russia I've been sitting here trying to figure out how exactly the Russians would put a case together in order to successfully sue the Penguins.

They don't have a case at all - they tried this with Nikolai Zherdev of the Blue Jackets and Ovechkin last year, and both cases were thrown out. So they're going to end up getting absolutely nothing for Malkin when they could have made out with $200,000. Besides, the Magnitogorsk brass promised him last year that they would not stand in the way if he wanted to come over here, which of course was a lie. This is all about money and Malkin is/was the pawn, plain and simple.

83-Steelers-43
08-22-2006, 08:59 AM
I'm curious to see what this does between Russian and North American relations when dealing with player transactions.

It seems to me that Russia is stuck between a rock and a hard place. If they don't sign the TA in the future then they will have to worry about "Malkin situations" every year. If they do sign the agreement it's not going to be for the millions and millions of dollars that they were pushing for when the TA talks started.

On top of the Malkin situation, this should be interesting to watch pan out.

X-Terminator
08-23-2006, 10:18 AM
I'm curious to see what this does between Russian and North American relations when dealing with player transactions.

It seems to me that Russia is stuck between a rock and a hard place. If they don't sign the TA in the future then they will have to worry about "Malkin situations" every year. If they do sign the agreement it's not going to be for the millions and millions of dollars that they were pushing for when the TA talks started.

On top of the Malkin situation, this should be interesting to watch pan out.

My guess is that eventually they will sign the TA - they will figure that getting something in return is better than losing their players for nothing. If they don't, then I see the players over there signing short-term deals (1 or 2 years) with the option to leave to play in the NHL if they so choose. But as bull-headed and greedy as the Russians are, they may continue to hold out and try to hold their players hostage, so to speak. We'll just have to see how it plays out.

83-Steelers-43
08-27-2006, 03:42 PM
Russians likely to sue Pens, NHL

By Jason Cato
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Sunday, August 27, 2006


Evgeni Malkin likely will don a Penguins uniform this year. The question is whether a U.S. judge will bar him from the NHL.

"He'll be playing, because no one can stop him," said Mark Gandler, an agent based in New Jersey who represents professional hockey players in the United States and Russia. "Only a court order can stop him."

NHL officials expect Malkin, 20, to sign a Penguins contract soon. If that happens, officials with his Russian team have sworn to fight the Penguins and the league in court.

Alexander Berkovich, a New York lawyer who has handled numerous international disputes involving Russian hockey players, believes Malkin will lose. Berkovich has been contacted by Malkin's former team, Metallurg Magnitogorsk.

"Hopefully, the NHL and the Penguins would respect contracts signed by players in foreign countries like they want their contracts respected," Berkovich said. "If not, the Russian team would have no other option but to go to court."

A 1958 United Nations treaty requires U.S. judges to enforce arbitration rulings from foreign countries, and Berkovich said Metallurg would vigorously pursue that avenue.

Malkin restructured his contract with Metallurg two weeks ago, then bolted the team days later after arriving in Finland for a preseason tournament.

Malkin, who has been referred to by Metallurg officials as a "Russian treasure," is now in a beachfront house in Los Angeles.

Penguins representatives and Malkin's agent, Pat Brisson, could not be reached for comment.

Metallurg officials were quoted in the Russian press Friday saying they soon could ask an arbitrator with the Russian Hockey Federation to bar Malkin from playing for another professional hockey team until his contract expires.

Malkin's new contract, which he says he signed after team officials exacted hours of extreme pressure, would end after the 2007 season instead of after '08, as his original three-year deal stipulated.

Berkovich has been involved in similar cases, including one last year against NHL Rookie of the Year Alexander Ovechkin of the Washington Capitals.

A federal judge in January declined to enforce a Russian arbitrator's finding and dismissed the case brought by Dynamo Moscow, which claimed to have contractual rights to Ovechkin. The judge said Ovechkin's Russian contract had an "out" clause that allowed him to return to the Capitals after the NHL lockout ended in 2006.

Berkovich said Malkin's case was different because of his contract with Metallurg.

The NHL has told its teams that Russian law allows workers to unilaterally terminate contracts by providing written two-weeks notice. Vladislav Tretyak, head of the Russian Ice Hockey Federation and the Russian professional hockey league, has acknowledged this, NHL spokesman Bill Daly said.

Berkovich called the two-week notice issue a red herring. While he agreed Malkin could submit a notice -- which he has -- it doesn't mean he's free to play for another team.

"If he wants to sunbathe in Southern California or if he wants to go to college, he can do that. If he wants to work another job, he can do that, too," Berkovich said. "But if he wants to play professional hockey, he can only do that with Metallurg until the conclusion of the 2007 season."

To keep Malkin off American ice this year, Metallurg first would have to get a favorable arbitration ruling in Russia, survive a likely appeal by Malkin, then successfully sue in the United States to have the Russian arbitration ruling upheld.

Under U.S. law, a judge can't force a player to perform for any team but can prevent him from playing for other teams while he has a valid contract.

None of this would be an issue today if Russia were part of the player compensation agreement through the International Ice Hockey Federation. Russia was part of a previous agreement from 1995 through 2004.

Now, Russia is the only major country with professional hockey that didn't sign on to the agreement.

Under the agreement, European players may opt out of their contracts to play in the NHL. In return, the foreign club is compensated $200,000.

That relatively small amount seems to have been a major reason the Russian Hockey Federation refused to sign the agreement. The Russians say Malkin is worth more -- possibly as much as the $20 million transfer fees that accompany top professional soccer players.

Daly believes another reason the Russians haven't signed the agreement is that they' don't want their best players to play in other countries.

Metallurg officials have accused the NHL and the Penguins of "sports terrorism" for luring Malkin to the United States.

If the two-week notice rule in Russian law is applicable in this case, Metallurg has less protection than it would have under the International Ice Hockey Federation agreement, said Matt Mitten, a law professor at Marquette University and head of the school's National Sports Law Institute.

But Metallurg also could try suing the Penguins for compensation, claiming the NHL franchise interfered with Malkin while he was under contract with another team. Berkovich said it's a "serious possibility" that Metallurg would bring such a claim against the Penguins.

Malkin also could face a separate lawsuit by Metallurg, which could seek financial damages caused by his departure, such as lost ticket revenues, Gandler said.

"But it's a worthwhile risk for the player, if he wants to play in the NHL," Gandler said. "I'd do it."

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/penguins/s_467942.html

X-Terminator
08-28-2006, 12:40 PM
I say let them sue. They'll end up spending more money fighting it than they would ever get back as compensation. If it turns out to be true that the Metallurg brass promised him that they would not stand in the way if he decided to leave, and then reneged on that promise, that would severely hamper their case. Regardless, I still say that Malkin will win the case if they do go to court, and will play for the Pens this year.

83-Steelers-43
08-28-2006, 01:56 PM
I certainly see Berkovich's point. But I have to wonder what kind of an angle Malkin's lawyers might play here, too. Specifically, if the facts of this case bear out that Metallurg officials did indeed come a-knockin' on the Malkin family's door at 3:00 AM, contract in hand, and used high-pressure tactics to get him to sign the contract, it could be argued that the contract is void because it was signed under duress.

And when I say "high-pressure tactics", I'm not even hinting at Russian mafia involvement. Malkin has said before that Metallurg officials have played significantly on nationalistic pressure, emphasizing Malkin's "duty" to his country and stuff like that. Those kind of tactics don't carry the same weight here in the States (hockey's World Championships aren't on TV in the States for a reason), but it's a very big deal to athletes in many other countries, and Russia is no exception.

Nevertheless, it wouldn't surprise me to hear Malkin's attorneys explore this angle if the situation calls for it. A contract can be deemed null and void if the court determines it was signed in a high-pressure situation where the signing party has little to no room to negotiate.

HometownGal
08-28-2006, 02:51 PM
"If he wants to sunbathe in Southern California or if he wants to go to college, he can do that. If he wants to work another job, he can do that, too," Berkovich said. "But if he wants to play professional hockey, he can only do that with Metallurg until the conclusion of the 2007 season."


I think it's fair to say that Malkin's attorneys could argue here that playing professional hockey in the U.S. could be classified as a job/profession.

X-Terminator
08-28-2006, 03:37 PM
I certainly see Berkovich's point. But I have to wonder what kind of an angle Malkin's lawyers might play here, too. Specifically, if the facts of this case bear out that Metallurg officials did indeed come a-knockin' on the Malkin family's door at 3:00 AM, contract in hand, and used high-pressure tactics to get him to sign the contract, it could be argued that the contract is void because it was signed under duress.

And when I say "high-pressure tactics", I'm not even hinting at Russian mafia involvement. Malkin has said before that Metallurg officials have played significantly on nationalistic pressure, emphasizing Malkin's "duty" to his country and stuff like that. Those kind of tactics don't carry the same weight here in the States (hockey's World Championships aren't on TV in the States for a reason), but it's a very big deal to athletes in many other countries, and Russia is no exception.

Nevertheless, it wouldn't surprise me to hear Malkin's attorneys explore this angle if the situation calls for it. A contract can be deemed null and void if the court determines it was signed in a high-pressure situation where the signing party has little to no room to negotiate.

That's likely the angle they will use. It's clear that Malkin didn't want to sign that contract and regretted it almost immediately after he did. There was no room for negotiation, as evidenced by his repeated pleadings to Velichkin to let him go and asking why won't they let him come over here to play after they promised that they wouldn't protest his decision. I'd think that most judges would rule in favor of Malkin in that instance, but given all of the twists and turns this saga has taken, you just never know.

83-Steelers-43
08-29-2006, 09:24 AM
Malkin's legal team waits for next move
Tuesday, August 29, 2006

By Shelly Anderson, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Today marks the end of the two-week period since Penguins prospect Evgeni Malkin gave notice that he wanted out of his contract in Russia, but his agent isn't sure what or when the next step will be.

"We're talking to legal counsel, and we'll go from there," Pat Brisson said last night. "Evgeni acted based on the [Russian] labor laws that are established. We're just playing it day by day."

Malkin remains in California working out with other NHL players. He flew to Los Angeles after slipping away from his Russian Super League team, Magnitogorsk Metallurg, while it was in Finland and submitting his two-week notice to terminate his employment.

Although Metallurg officials have hinted at taking legal steps to prevent Malkin from playing in the NHL this season, Brisson said he is not aware of anything that has been filed.

Russia declined to participate in the transfer agreement between the NHL and the International Ice Hockey Federation.

Contract negotiations with the Penguins have not begun, but they aren't expected to be contentious because of parameters set by the NHL's collective bargaining agreement.

Brisson said Malkin has expressed a strong interest in being in training camp with the Penguins, who this year have added a rookie session before the bulk of the team arrives. Rookies and other prospects are scheduled to report Sept. 7.

Malkin, 20, the second overall pick in the 2004 NHL draft, is in contact with family and friends in Russia, Brisson said.

In addition to daily on- and off-ice workouts, Malkin is learning about North American culture.

"He's getting acclimated," Brisson said, adding that Alexander Mogilny, a Russian native who defected in 1989 and who is in Malkin's workout group, has been a tremendous help.

X-Terminator
08-29-2006, 12:01 PM
My guess is that he signs a contract within the next few days, and then Metallurg slaps him with the lawsuit that I still maintain they won't win.

I've always found it comical that they're asking for tens of millions of dollars for Malkin. The NHL just came out of a lockout and doesn't pull in anywhere near the amount of money that European soccer teams do. What do they expect, for the Pens to wave a magic wand and a Brinks truck falls out of the sky?

BlackNGold203
08-29-2006, 12:04 PM
i hope they sign him quick...so if theres a lawsuit...it can be taken care of before the season starts....:cool: :cool:

83-Steelers-43
09-04-2006, 06:13 PM
Well XT and Shaun, this is what we have been waiting for. Oh yeah.....:bouncy:

Malkin to sign with Penguins tomorrow
Monday, September 04, 2006

By Dave Molinari, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

The Penguins and Russian center Evgeni Malkin have agreed on all but the final few details of an entry-level contract.

The deal covers three years, as mandated by the NHL's collective bargaining agreement, and will feature a base salary of $984,200. That is the maximium for a player drafted in 2004, when the Penguins claimed Malkin with the second choice in the entry draft.

Malkin's package is expected to include a collection of performance- and award-based bonuses that could be worth over $2.5 million, depending on how many he reaches.

Malkin, who left his Russian Super League team last month while it was training in Finland, has spend the past few weeks in Los Angeles. He is expected to sign his contract before a press conference tomorrow morning at Mellon Arena and will be present for the start of the team's rookie camp Thursday.

It remains to be seen if Malkin's Russian team, Metallurg Magnitogorsk, will take legal action to prevent him from playing in North America. Magnitogorsk has threatened to do so, contending it has a valid contract with Malkin.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06247/719014-100.stm

BlackNGold203
09-04-2006, 06:48 PM
Alrighty then...let the legal games begin.....:cool: :cool:

HometownGal
09-04-2006, 11:46 PM
Alrighty then...let the legal games begin.....:cool: :cool:

Yep - time for the sheisters to get to sheistering (is that a word?) LOL!

This is indeed great news! :bouncy: Hurry up NHL season - get here!

83-Steelers-43
09-05-2006, 12:53 AM
They had a picture of Malkin walking inside the airport in Pittsburgh sporting an Iron city beer shirt. Wait until he drinks it for the first time...:chug: :puke:

83-Steelers-43
09-05-2006, 10:35 AM
His PC is on FSN right now.

BlackNGold203
09-05-2006, 10:51 AM
It's official: Penguins sign Russian star Malkin

It's finally official -- Evgeni Malkin is a member of the Pittsburgh Penguins.


Evgeni Malkin has spent the past few weeks practicing in El Segundo, Calif.
General manager Ray Shero announced Tuesday that the team signed the second overall pick in the 2004 draft to a deal, just two days before the start of the Penguins' rookie training camp. The team made quick work to post the news on the Internet, updating their Web site's home page with an image of a sprawling Malkin under a banner headline bearing his name.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2574012

HometownGal
09-05-2006, 12:48 PM
I just got the email notice from the Pens and I'm thrilled! Welcome, Evegni - we Pens fans are very happy campers to have you on board! :cool:

Now - will the season hurry up and start? I can't wait to watch this kid perform on the ice! :bouncy:

cbalke
09-05-2006, 02:16 PM
awesome! can't wait to see him and sid on a line together. gives me goose bumps just thinking about it. :)

83-Steelers-43
09-05-2006, 10:40 PM
awesome! can't wait to see him and sid on a line together. gives me goose bumps just thinking about it. :)

You won't see them on the same line together unless we are on the PP. My prediction and what I feel should happen......Therrien will split them up and make two lines.

X-Terminator
09-06-2006, 03:49 AM
First of all, I haven't stopped smiling since I heard the news! I'm so glad he's signed and can't wait for the season to start! :bouncy:

As for the lines, Therrien will definitely split them up and make 2 lines, probably like this:

Recchi-Crosby-Armstrong
Ekman-Malkin-Malone

OR

Ekman-Crosby-Armstrong
LeClair-Malkin-Recchi

Either setup would be fine with me...

83-Steelers-43
09-06-2006, 09:41 AM
As for the lines, Therrien will definitely split them up and make 2 lines, probably like this:

Recchi-Crosby-Armstrong
Ekman-Malkin-Malone

OR

Ekman-Crosby-Armstrong
LeClair-Malkin-Recchi

Either setup would be fine with me...

It will be interesting to see how Therrien pairs up the lines. One thing I hope to see this season is for Therrien to set the lines and keep them intact for a good amount of time.

This is a young team for the most part and he needs to let these kids mold together. They will never mold together if he keeps switching up the lines (the first two in particular) from game to game. Set them, let them play and let them mold.

X-Terminator
09-06-2006, 10:38 AM
It will be interesting to see how Therrien pairs up the lines. One thing I hope to see this season is for Therrien to set the lines and keep them intact for a good amount of time.

This is a young team for the most part and he needs to let these kids mold together. They will never mold together if he keeps switching up the lines (the first two in particular) from game to game. Set them, let them play and let them mold.

I think Therrien had to juggle the lines so much last season because other than Crosby's line, they got zero consistency from their forwards. Having Malkin on board coupled with the acquisitions they've made through trades and FA pretty much solidifies their lines, IMO. Even the 4th line looks pretty solid if they decide to keep Talbot here to play between Roy and Petrovicky. If they can all stay healthy, the team should be much more consistent than last season and should put together a few more wins.

HometownGal
09-06-2006, 12:59 PM
I like the lines of Ekman-Crosby-Armstrong and LeClair-Malkin-Recchi much better than your first selection, XT. :smile: Crosby has a year under his belt now - put the seasoned vets with Malkin - they'd be awesome together! :cool:

I received this email from the Pens yesterday, if anyone is interested. XT and I are going and if anyone else decides to go, PM me and maybe we can hook up at the skate. :smile:


Rookie Camp Open to Public This Weekend
First Chance to See Evgeni Malkin at Mellon Arena

The Pittsburgh Penguins will hold a rookie camp for young prospects from Sept. 7-12 at Mellon Arena. Prospects will report for physicals, meetings and testing on Sept. 7 and then be on the ice from Sept. 8-12.

The sessions on Saturday, Sept. 9, and Sunday, Sept. 10, will be open to the public from 10:00-11:30 am.

cbalke
09-06-2006, 02:29 PM
i don't know, man...you'd be EXTREMELY hard pressed to convince me why we shouldn't put the two most talented young skaters in the world on the same line to work together and develop together. in NOT doing that, it really seems more of a waste of potential talent with the sum of their talent being greater than the parts.

i'll set precendence too - gretzky and kuri, selanne and kariya, straka and kovelev, straka and jagr, lemieux and jagr(in 91, 92), kovelev and jagr....

obviously, the pens have had some dominant forwards and i'll be biased toward them, but seriously, why NOT put them together and let them grow together?

83-Steelers-43
09-06-2006, 03:14 PM
i don't know, man...you'd be EXTREMELY hard pressed to convince me why we shouldn't put the two most talented young skaters in the world on the same line to work together and develop together. in NOT doing that, it really seems more of a waste of potential talent with the sum of their talent being greater than the parts.

i'll set precendence too - gretzky and kuri, selanne and kariya, straka and kovelev, straka and jagr, lemieux and jagr(in 91, 92), kovelev and jagr....

obviously, the pens have had some dominant forwards and i'll be biased toward them, but seriously, why NOT put them together and let them grow together?

When your not stalked like other teams, you can't afford to put two of the worlds best players on the same line. You need to spread the talent. We are not the Rangers, Ducks or the Penguins of the early 90's.

I bet the bank that you see Malkin and Crosby on separate lines unless it's a PP.

BlackNGold203
09-06-2006, 03:35 PM
You have to split them up...end of story....

:cool: :cool:

BlackNGold203
09-06-2006, 03:36 PM
BTW...LOL...who is Ekman???

83-Steelers-43
09-06-2006, 05:56 PM
BTW...LOL...who is Ekman???

http://www.pittsburghpenguins.com/team/bio.php?id=189

X-Terminator
09-06-2006, 08:54 PM
You beat me to it 83 lol...

X-Terminator
09-17-2006, 12:01 AM
Well, this saga still isn't over yet - the Russian hockey federation has ruled that Malkin can't play for the Pens this year, and is asking the team to void his contract. Good luck with that, boys!

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/s_470706.html

Pittsburgh Penguins star-in-the-making Evgeni Malkin can play only for the Russian team he abandoned last month, an arbitration committee of the Russian Ice Hockey Federation ruled today.
A New York-based lawyer for Metallurg Magnitogorsk, Malkin’s former team, said the committee issued a one-page decision today in Moscow.

“My understanding is, the prohibition bans Malkin from playing for any other hockey clubs other than Metallurg Magnitogorsk for the 2006-2007 season,” said Alexander Berkovich, who has represented other Russian teams and players in similar cases.

Malkin, 20, has a week to ask for the ruling to be reconsidered by Russia’s Arbitration Court for Sports, a Moscow-based tribunal independent of the hockey federation.

In August, Malkin abandoned Metallurg in Finland after arriving to play in a preseason tournament. Days earlier, he signed a new contract with his Russian team. The remaining two years on his contract were reworked into a deal for Malkin to play through this season and then be free to play in the National Hockey League. The Russian phenom, considered to have been the best hockey player not playing in the NHL, said he signed the new contract under duress.

Malkin now is a member of the Penguins and participating in the team’s training camp at Mellon Arena. He signed a three-year deal worth nearly $3 million on Sept. 5 to play for the Penguins, which selected him with the second pick in the 2004 NHL draft.

Berkovich said he would send a letter today to the NHL and the Penguins asking them to honor the arbitration award and cancel Malkin’s contract.

NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly said the league has not received official notification of the decision, and declined further comment.

Under Russian labor laws, all employees work under contract. Employees can terminate labor contracts by providing their employers with a written two-week notice. Malkin faxed his notice to Metallurg officials in early August.

Berkovich argues that professional athletes, actors and other professionals in Russia cannot terminate their contracts the same as other workers.

83-Steelers-43
09-17-2006, 12:16 AM
The Penguins should write the Russian federation a letter which simply states "Below me".

X-Terminator
09-17-2006, 12:23 AM
The Penguins should write the Russian federation a letter which simply states "Below me".

Or fax them that oft-circulated and photoshopped pic of that kid flipping the bird at a soccer game...