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Hawaii 5-0
01-09-2013, 12:34 AM
2013: Career Crossroads For Ben Roethlisberger

Jan 6th, 2013 by Jeff SneddenSteelers

http://cdn.fansided.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/58/files/2013/01/ben_roethlisberger_seymour_fine_1070480951-300x192.jpg

The 2012 season did not go quite according to plan for the Pittsburgh Steelers, nor for Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. An ominous black cloud descended on the team all the way back in the spring, when offensive coordinator and Big Ben best friend Bruce Arians was unceremoniously dumped by the team. Under the guise of a “retirement”, Arians was shown the door. This created a friction between Roethlisberger and team officials that had not been present before, a friction that only grew once Arians quickly took a job with the Indianapolis Colts and was replaced by the intense Todd Haley. The media jumped on the Roethlisberger vs. Haley conflict from day one, and as they and the fan base stirred the pot on the new dynamic of the Steelers offense, more was happening in the Roethlisberger world.

The quarterback and his wife, Ashley, announced that they would soon be parents for the first time. The grown-up portion of his life in full bloom, Ben became noticeably more sentimental in interviews and for the first time, fans began to start preparing themselves for the possibility of life without #7 behind center. While that may be a ways off still, there is no doubt that the events of the past year, combined with another serious injury (this time a rib cage issue that came within inches of affecting the heart) and the birth of his first child – a son, Benjamin Todd Roethlisberger Jr. has changed the quarterback immensely. When we write and read about professional athletes, it is very easy to forget that these are people who have the same concerns as the rest of the world, minus the financial stress. The injury Ben sustained against the Kansas City Chiefs in Week 10 was scary, but the added pressure of knowing his wife was less then a week away from the birth of their child added a perspective that could only be understood by a parent. Now that the 2012 season is over, and the Steelers are making golf plans instead of holding playoff practices, we are left to wonder exactly which Ben Roethlisberger will show up in Latrobe this summer.

He came to us as a lanky kid out of tiny Miami University of Ohio, clean cut and looking more like an NBA forward than an NFL Quarterback. He was the first major prospect the Steelers had invested in behind center since Terry Bradshaw. In between, Steelers fans were subjected to two decades of Mark Malone, Bubby Brister, Neil O’Donnell, and of course Kordell Stewart. The man Ben would replace as the Steelers starter, Tommy Maddox, became the most popular fellow in town during his amazing two and a half year run with the team. Ben Roethlisberger was drafted on April 24, 2004 with the 11th pick in the 1st round of the NFL Draft. He signed his first professional contract on August 4, a six-year $22.26 million deal that prompted then head coach Bill Cowher to call him “a franchise quarterback” before he ever took a regular season snap. Originally designated the 3rd string QB, Roethlisberger shifted up to the backup role after Charlie Batch was injured in the preseason. Tommy Maddox would start the season for the Steelers, but just six quarters of football later, Maddox was hurt and the Era of Big Ben began. The Steelers would lose that game to the arch-nemesis Baltimore Ravens, but little did we all know that it would be the last time the Steelers would taste defeat until deep into the frozen depths of January.

The Steelers plan to allow Roethlisberger to sit behind Maddox and Batch for a season and learn the offense was shot, and a nervous Steeler Nation turned our attention to #7 and his very diverse playing style. That 2004 season was amazing on so many different levels, from the unexpected MVP-caliber play of the 22-year old phenom to the unheard-of back-to-back wins over the undefeated New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles in consecutive home games over Halloween week. All told, Roethlisberger helped orchestrate SIX come from behind wins in 2004, including the AFC Divisional playoff game against the New York Jets. He was named the AP NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year, and the Steelers quickly became a team that had the look of a Super Bowl contender once again.

Roethlisberger seemed to almost immediately earn the respect of his peers. We all looked on like proud parents as he developed into a professional player and an icon to the city of Pittsburgh in just a few short months. In 2005, he would lead the Steelers back from a 7-5 hole to lead the team into the playoffs. Under his guidance and the emotional support of the retiring Jerome Bettis, the Steelers would finally put the nail in the coffin of “One for the Thumb”. The Steelers would win eight straight games, including three road playoff games and Super Bowl XL to achieve the goal that so many had fell short of in the past. Roethlisberger would save the season one final time in Indianapolis, making a shoe-string tackle on a fumble recovery that secured the road win against the heavily-favored Indianapolis Colts in the AFC Divisional round. Despite a lackluster performance in the Super Bowl versus Seattle,

Roethlisberger cemented himself into the forever lore of a great sports city by delivering the elusive fifth Lombardi Trophy. In doing so, he secured the legacy of Jerome Bettis – who retired on stage holding the hardware in a stadium in the town he grew up – a classic sports moment if there ever was one. He helped wipe the cobwebs off of the coaching legacy of Bill Cowher, who wanted nothing more than to hand Dan Rooney that Lombardi since the day he was hired to coach his home town team in 1992. The win also allowed the Pittsburgh Steelers to regain a piece of their dominant past, becoming just the third team to win five Super Bowls. It was a magical season that would not have been possible without the 2004 draft pick of Ben Roethlisberger.

Roethlisberger would accomplish another feat in 2008 that had eluded every Steelers QB since Heinz Field opened in 2001. He guided the Steelers to an AFC Championship Game victory over the hated Ravens in the frigid confines of the “new” stadium. While it may not seem like such a major achievement to fans outside of Pittsburgh, those who had suffered through horrendous losses in the AFC title games at home in 1994, 1997, 2001, and 2004 were beginning to doubt it would ever happen. When Troy Polamalu returned a Joe Flacco interception for the game securing TD, the sense of relief set off a celebration that will forever be remembered as one of the great moments in team history. A few weeks later, it was Roethlisberger leading a last minute drive – masterfully – to score the winning touchdown in the waning seconds of Super Bowl XLIII. The victory over the Arizona Cardinals gave the Steelers an NFL-leading six Super Bowl titles, and it gave Ben his second in only his fifth NFL season. It seemed as though the winning would go on forever, and a second Steelers dynasty was ready to emerge.

Prior to the 2006 season, the first crack in the armor of Big Ben occurred. While riding his motorcycle in downtown Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger was involved in an accident. He was not wearing a helmet – not a crime, but not smart for a multimillion dollar NFL QB – and sustained injuries to his head, mouth, jaw, and teeth. The injuries were not serious, but for the first time in his career, fans began to wonder about the general mindset of their star QB. It was right around this same time that stories and pictures began to flood the internet of Roethlisberger partying with college students. Ben Roethlisberger had quickly morphed from small town college star to national celebrity, and the status change may have begun to hinder his decision-making ability it seemed. Even more stories poured out about Ben, from general cockiness to an inability to treat wait staff and service workers with respect around town. By the time Super Bowl XLIII was over, most people had forgotten about the accident and the rumors, as the hardware seemed to solidify that regardless of what Roethlisberger was doing off the field, he could deliver on the field – where it mattered.

The 2009 season ended up being a disappointing one for the Steelers coming off their Super Bowl victory. Injuries plagued the team, including Roethlisberger, who missed a Week 12 match-up with the Ravens, an overtime loss that would eventually secure the Steelers missing the postseason. Despite the lackluster season for the team, Roethlisberger played very well. He threw for over 4,000 yards, the first Steeler QB to ever accomplish that feat, and was selected to the Pro Bowl as a first alternate, although an injured shoulder prohibited him from attending. Following the 2009 season, the real trouble began in the personal life of Pittsburgh’s biggest celebrity. Two very public accusations of sexual misconduct were raised against the Pittsburgh quarterback. The first one, filed on July 19, 2009, claimed that Roethlisberger had forced himself onto a Lake Tahoe resort worker in his hotel suite while attending a golf outing there in 2008. The case began to fall apart as soon as it hit the mainstream media, with the details and stories of all involved conflicting and the lack of evidence due to the long time span between the alleged event and the actual report causing authorities to abandon the case. Just a few months later in March 2009, another woman claimed that Ben had forced himself onto her while at a college bar in Milledgeville, GA. This case became ever more of a national newsline, and eventually led to Reothlisberger being suspended for the first six games of the 2010 NFL season. The suspension would be reduced to four games, and served. No criminal charges were filed due to a lack of evidence, and despite what many detractors will continue to say to this day – Ben Roethlisberger was never charged, nor found guilty of any alleged sexual misconduct. Regardless, the stain was now on the record of Ben Roethlisberger. It seemed that his life needed to be evaluated on a personal level, and that frankly, he needed to pull himself out of any situation that could result in “allegations”, whether truthful or simply made up.

After the events of 2009-2010 died down, Ben Roethlisberger made many conscious changes to his lifestyle. He embraced his religion, he began doing even more charity work (although he was always a generous person with his time and money, he turned it up a notch), and he began to do every requested interview to answer as many questions about the past legal issues, becoming an open book for all to see. Ben Roethlisberger grew up quite a bit between 2008 and 2010, and he once again led the Steelers to the brink of a championship. The Steelers would lose Super Bowl XLV to Green Bay, but getting back to the big game served as a marker in the life of Big Ben – a moment in time that quantified just how far he had come as a professional athlete, as a teammate, and most of all, as a man.

Much has changed with the Pittsburgh Steelers over the past two years. The team would go 12-4 in 2011, but lose in the first round of the playoffs to an upstart Denver Broncos team. The Arians saga seemed to take a lot out of Roethlisberger, and his subsequent bickering with Todd Haley was a product of that saga. The Steelers sagged to an 8-8 finish in 2012, and for the first time we have begun to hear Ben answer questions about retirement. While he seems to be a ways away from any legitimate retirement concerns, the facts remain that Ben Roethlisberger will be 31-years old at the start of the 2013 season, heading into his tenth season at the helm of the Steelers offense. He has been hit more than any other TWO quarterbacks in the NFL combined over the past six seasons. He has battled injuries to his ankles, knees, shoulder, fingers, neck, and many that we probably don’t even know about. Ben Roethlisberger is the definition of warrior in the football sense, but when do the injuries become a major concern for a man who is now married and the father of an infant son (Little Ben)? The eight-year extension that he signed in 2008 runs through the end of the 2016 season, which gives him three more full seasons to build on a resume that should land him as a first-ballot Hall of Fame inductee. His desire to win a third Super Bowl is obvious, but more so it seems that the past year has simply taken its toll both mentally and physically on Roethlisberger. With the team entering a transition phase in terms of veterans leaving and younger players beginning to move up the depth chart, it is possible that the Steelers have another middle of the road season ahead of them in 2013. A 100% healthy Ben Roethlisberger could change that, as his presence on the field gives the Steelers a chance to win every Sunday. While the finish to this past season was dreadful – game-losing interceptions, missing more time with the shoulder injury, and of course missing the playoffs – it was the way Ben seemed to be disconnected from the game and the fans that really caused the greatest concern across Steeler Nation. Perhaps a full offseason of healing his body and mind and spending time with his wife and son will be just what the doctor ordered, and Roethlisberger will return fresh and ready to go after that seventh Lombardi this summer in Latrobe.

Or perhaps these are the waning days of the Big Ben Era in Pittsburgh. Either way, this year – 2013 – is the virtual crossroads in the career of one of the greatest players to ever wear the black and gold. Hopefully, the organization will ensure that Ben Roethlisberger gets to go out the way that he has always wanted – as a Steeler, and as a Champion. In this era of free agency and salary cap issues ripping franchise players away from their teams, if there was ever anybody who deserved to finish what he has started, it is Ben Roethlisberger. He has given it ALL to Steeler Nation – 29 4th quarter comeback victories, including two playoff games and one Super Bowl, a career .714 winning percentage, a slew of franchise and league records, and of course two Super Bowl rings. Maybe now is the time that we all pay him back for what he has given to us.

Whether he comes out and announces his retirement tomorrow or plays for another five years, Ben Roethlisberger deserves our respect and admiration. He is a player that we will all tell our grandchildren that we saw play, just like the stories we all grew up on about Bradshaw, Swann, and Lambert. Enjoy him while he is here folks, for there will never be another Big Ben Roethlisberger.

http://nicepickcowher.com/2013/01/06/2013-career-crossroads-for-ben-roethlisberger/

steelfury02
01-09-2013, 08:49 AM
Great read and really puts the player and the person into perspective. It really is a turning point in his career. He either has 1-2 more big things he'll accomplish as a Steeler or, his best accomplishments are behind him. Either way, he's a HOF - which echelon of HOFers will he fall into? Time will tell. He'll be one of my favorite Steelers of all time no matter what.

maddog78
01-09-2013, 08:56 AM
The injury derailed everything. Even with the injuries to the OL, I think he would have played better down the stretch had he never gotten hurt.

Still put up a damn good statistical year, but lost something the last four games.

Unfortunately, this is the rule, not the exception. Guy gets banged up every single year.

steelfury02
01-09-2013, 09:19 AM
The injury derailed everything. Even with the injuries to the OL, I think he would have played better down the stretch had he never gotten hurt.

Still put up a damn good statistical year, but lost something the last four games.

Unfortunately, this is the rule, not the exception. Guy gets banged up every single year.

Couldn't agree more - especially your last statement. Our fave team needs to continue to find ways to keep those big fellas in front of him healthy (or healthy enough anyways)

Also though, while I believe in a scheme that doesn't over-emphasize 7 step drops and holding onto the ball for the play to develop and win by a supporting cast - they can't play too timid either with Ben, because he will get hurt playing that way too - we want him to go balls out.

That said - he was the lead MVP candidate in my eyes before the injury. I think we were heading in the right direction. Here's to picking up where we left off at 5-3 heading into KC:drink:

El-Gonzo Jackson
01-09-2013, 09:22 AM
Is there a point to that article or is it just reciting history? For those Steeler fans that have been here since 2003, its nothing they dont already know.

maddog78
01-09-2013, 10:18 AM
Time to take the backup QB position seriously, not just hand jobs to family friends. Need a more reliable guy as the #2 and a Jerrod Johnson type as the #3. Ben would not have started in SF last year or against SD this year if the staff had confidence in the backup to score more than 13 points.

Darkstorm05
01-09-2013, 10:22 AM
Great read and really puts the player and the person into perspective. It really is a turning point in his career. He either has 1-2 more big things he'll accomplish as a Steeler or, his best accomplishments are behind him. Either way, he's a HOF - which echelon of HOFers will he fall into? Time will tell. He'll be one of my favorite Steelers of all time no matter what.

This will likely be an unpopular opinion here, but unless he picks up a 3rd ring I don't see Ben as being a lock for the HOF. While his first few years were impressive, his last couple were not, and he just doesn't have the huge stats to stand out in the new pass happy NFL. If he goes on 5 more years without another SB, I give him a 50% shot.

El-Gonzo Jackson
01-09-2013, 10:37 AM
This will likely be an unpopular opinion here, but unless he picks up a 3rd ring I don't see Ben as being a lock for the HOF. While his first few years were impressive, his last couple were not, and he just doesn't have the huge stats to stand out in the new pass happy NFL. If he goes on 5 more years without another SB, I give him a 50% shot.

I think that is a fair assessment. He doesnt have the huge stats as you point out and in the 3 super bowl's he played.....2 of them he wasnt that great at.

I still think he should be around for the next 5 seasons or more, but the team window on getting to another Super Bowl is closing. All the great supporting cast is getting old and the young guys arent that special so far.

VaDave
01-09-2013, 11:55 AM
Good read. Thanks for posting it.

As for Ben's Hall of Fame credentials, I agree, he's going to need one more Super Bowl. If Manning get's his 3rd first, even a third for Ben may not be enough.

For some of us that were around for the Bradshaw era, I used to think that I was fortunate to have had a franchise QB that great. Very few in the NFL fans have been treated to two of them in their lifetime.

Here's to Ben's health.

Hawaii 5-0
01-09-2013, 02:03 PM
This will likely be an unpopular opinion here, but unless he picks up a 3rd ring I don't see Ben as being a lock for the HOF. While his first few years were impressive, his last couple were not, and he just doesn't have the huge stats to stand out in the new pass happy NFL. If he goes on 5 more years without another SB, I give him a 50% shot.

I agree with you.

Jim Plunkett has two Super Bowl rings and he's not in the HOF, and unless Ben earns another ring or plays better than he has been he won't get in either.

harrison'samonster
01-09-2013, 02:20 PM
I don't know, Plunkett's stats are a lot less than Ben's, and especially his career w-l record, which is 72-72 (.500).

Personally, I believe if anything keeps him out it will be the off-field things.

steelfury02
01-09-2013, 02:23 PM
I agree with you.

Jim Plunkett has two Super Bowl rings and he's not in the HOF, and unless Ben earns another ring or plays better than he has been he won't get in either.

I get what you are saying

However,

Roethlisberger did have one of the most clutch performances in SB history, if not the best come from behind drive ever, will retire with some important Steeler QB records, on top of a nice winning percentage, career completion percentage, playoff record, ROY, a couple of pro bowls, AND, while Marino had the stats, I just can't accept Marino and Jim Kelly in the HOF and not Ben Roethlisberger.

All that said, I do think Ben will retire with 1 more ring and a couple more Pro bowls to enhance his resume.

teegre
01-09-2013, 03:18 PM
This will likely be an unpopular opinion here, but unless he picks up a 3rd ring I don't see Ben as being a lock for the HOF. While his first few years were impressive, his last couple were not, and he just doesn't have the huge stats to stand out in the new pass happy NFL. If he goes on 5 more years without another SB, I give him a 50% shot.

I agree that the voters will not like BB. But, I think that the dude is the epitome of HoFer.

I equate BB to Hines Ward: They changed the way the game is played.

Hines Ward does not have the greatest stats, but he took the WR from a position of "merely" glamour to a position where you can block the snot out of a DB (& help your RB get an extra 5-10 yards). Every WR since Ward has learned how to block; the entire NFL changed.

BB's style of play is like NO other player in the entire NFL (which is why I love him, and why comparing him to Brees (et al) makes no sense). BB is unsackable (Yes, he gets lots of sacks, but that is because he runs around for 7 seconds; you try that with any other QB, and they have double the number of sacks that BB gets). And, his pump-fake is incredible. When the pocket breaks down, no one else can do what BB does.

I remember hearing Terrell Suggs talk about a rookie LB who was all "hot to trot" to sack BB. Suggs kept saying, "You've never played against him." The rookie kept on going about how he'd sack BB three times or more. Suggs iterated, "You've never played agaisnt him." Then... in the game... that LB had BB dead to rites... and that LB whiffed. THAT is why BB is a HoFer.

Lastly, that final drive in XLIII is the greatest drive & one of the greatest plays in SuperBowl history.

That drive... plus, his rookie season... his incredible post-season record... his record-setting three game post-season in 2005 (highest QB rating in NFL post-season history)... and two (maybe five) Lombardi trophies makes him a HoFer.

harrison'samonster
01-09-2013, 03:21 PM
That drive... plus, his rookie season... his incredible post-season record... his record-setting three game post-season in 2005 (highest QB rating in NFL post-season history)... and two (maybe five) Lombardi trophies makes him a HoFer.

at least 5. I agree, he's not comparable to other QB's and that's why most of us want him over others.

austinfrench76
01-09-2013, 03:46 PM
I like the article from a pure "rehashing the past" perspective but when was there ever any bickering with Haley. It seems like th ethings to say amongst the media but I'm not sure I ever saw it. Ben had a couple of very small moments but when as there thus derailing type of commotion??? The injury ended our season. Time to move on to 2013, ultimately the 2014 SB, BB's 3rd title and the Steelers7th!!!!!!!

Darkstorm05
01-09-2013, 04:53 PM
I agree that the voters will not like BB. But, I think that the dude is the epitome of HoFer.

I equate BB to Hines Ward: They changed the way the game is played.

Hines Ward does not have the greatest stats, but he took the WR from a position of "merely" glamour to a position where you can block the snot out of a DB (& help your RB get an extra 5-10 yards). Every WR since Ward has learned how to block; the entire NFL changed.

BB's style of play is like NO other player in the entire NFL (which is why I love him, and why comparing him to Brees (et al) makes no sense). BB is unsackable (Yes, he gets lots of sacks, but that is because he runs around for 7 seconds; you try that with any other QB, and they have double the number of sacks that BB gets). And, his pump-fake is incredible. When the pocket breaks down, no one else can do what BB does.

I remember hearing Terrell Suggs talk about a rookie LB who was all "hot to trot" to sack BB. Suggs kept saying, "You've never played against him." The rookie kept on going about how he'd sack BB three times or more. Suggs iterated, "You've never played agaisnt him." Then... in the game... that LB had BB dead to rites... and that LB whiffed. THAT is why BB is a HoFer.

Lastly, that final drive in XLIII is the greatest drive & one of the greatest plays in SuperBowl history.

That drive... plus, his rookie season... his incredible post-season record... his record-setting three game post-season in 2005 (highest QB rating in NFL post-season history)... and two (maybe five) Lombardi trophies makes him a HoFer.

While that's all true, you have to look at the era he plays in, and the way the league is going. Voters will do that when it's time to induct. Ben will be compared to Brady, both Mannings, Brees, Rivers, RGIII, Rodgers, Luck, Carson Palmer, Newton, Andy Dalton, Flacco, and on and on. We all know Peyton and Brady make it. They can't induct them all though, so now they start ranking.

Palmer is shit, but he has as many passing yards as Ben. Flacco could end up with SB rings, even though he's shit. Rodgers and RGIII are huge media darlings. Unless they both fizzle out in a big way, they'll be looked on more favorably than Ben. Now things are really getting close. IMO, if everything goes on as it is today, Ben has to beat Eli Manning for a HOF spot. If Eli ends up at 3 rings but Ben doesn't, Eli gets in and Ben does not.

The league is moving towards fast play, big passes, and high scores. Ben will need stat lines to match that if he wants to be in the HOF. New QB's coming into the league will be putting up more and more yards and points, so he'll stand out less and less if he doesn't have a few more big seasons. While he may bring unique play to the position, it's not a unique style that the wider fanbase likes, so I don't think it will do much for him. Otherwise he would be the guy pimping shoes and car insurance on national TV instead of trying to sell bottles of sauce at Giant Eagle.

steelfury02
01-09-2013, 05:24 PM
While that's all true, you have to look at the era he plays in, and the way the league is going. Voters will do that when it's time to induct. Ben will be compared to Brady, both Mannings, Brees, Rivers, RGIII, Rodgers, Luck, Carson Palmer, Newton, Andy Dalton, Flacco, and on and on. We all know Peyton and Brady make it. They can't induct them all though, so now they start ranking.

Palmer is shit, but he has as many passing yards as Ben. Flacco could end up with SB rings, even though he's shit. Rodgers and RGIII are huge media darlings. Unless they both fizzle out in a big way, they'll be looked on more favorably than Ben. Now things are really getting close. IMO, if everything goes on as it is today, Ben has to beat Eli Manning for a HOF spot. If Eli ends up at 3 rings but Ben doesn't, Eli gets in and Ben does not.

The league is moving towards fast play, big passes, and high scores. Ben will need stat lines to match that if he wants to be in the HOF. New QB's coming into the league will be putting up more and more yards and points, so he'll stand out less and less if he doesn't have a few more big seasons. While he may bring unique play to the position, it's not a unique style that the wider fanbase likes, so I don't think it will do much for him. Otherwise he would be the guy pimping shoes and car insurance on national TV instead of trying to sell bottles of sauce at Giant Eagle.

If the Rooney's wouldn't handcuff him, he might have been able to score the Uncle Charlie's sausage deal early in the game, instead of waiting at the last minute to bail out the local meat and produce economy . . .:wink02:

teegre
01-09-2013, 07:00 PM
While that's all true, you have to look at the era he plays in, and the way the league is going. Voters will do that when it's time to induct. Ben will be compared to Brady, both Mannings, Brees, Rivers, RGIII, Rodgers, Luck, Carson Palmer, Newton, Andy Dalton, Flacco, and on and on. We all know Peyton and Brady make it. They can't induct them all though, so now they start ranking.

Palmer is shit, but he has as many passing yards as Ben. Flacco could end up with SB rings, even though he's shit. Rodgers and RGIII are huge media darlings. Unless they both fizzle out in a big way, they'll be looked on more favorably than Ben. Now things are really getting close. IMO, if everything goes on as it is today, Ben has to beat Eli Manning for a HOF spot. If Eli ends up at 3 rings but Ben doesn't, Eli gets in and Ben does not.

The league is moving towards fast play, big passes, and high scores. Ben will need stat lines to match that if he wants to be in the HOF. New QB's coming into the league will be putting up more and more yards and points, so he'll stand out less and less if he doesn't have a few more big seasons. While he may bring unique play to the position, it's not a unique style that the wider fanbase likes, so I don't think it will do much for him. Otherwise he would be the guy pimping shoes and car insurance on national TV instead of trying to sell bottles of sauce at Giant Eagle.

It sounds like we agree that the media's perception of BB is a strike against him for the HoF voting.

Does he deserve to get in? Yes.
Does his style of play decrease hsi chance ot get in? Yes.

Look at XLIII. He was the MVP... yet... he did not get a single vote.

As far as advertising dollars, I have to say that his "rape" accusations jinxed him for good. He was starting to get a few national ads... and then, there was the rape cases... and another rape case... and advertisers would not touch him for anything, regardless of whether or not he did it.

zcoop
01-09-2013, 07:08 PM
If the Rooney's wouldn't handcuff him, he might have been able to score the Uncle Charlie's sausage deal early in the game, instead of waiting at the last minute to bail out the local meat and produce economy . . .:wink02:

Don't start no shit man! :rofl:

Darkstorm05
01-09-2013, 07:27 PM
It sounds like we agree that the media's perception of BB is a strike against him for the HoF voting.

Does he deserve to get in? Yes.
Does his style of play decrease hsi chance ot get in? Yes.

Look at XLIII. He was the MVP... yet... he did not get a single vote.

As far as advertising dollars, I have to say that his "rape" accusations jinxed him for good. He was starting to get a few national ads... and then, there was the rape cases... and another rape case... and advertisers would not touch him for anything, regardless of whether or not he did it.

Yea, think we're on the same page. BUT, as I began with, if he goes out big, he can overcome, IMO. Look at Ray Lewis. He WAS the MVP, but Disney wanted nothing to do with a killer that walked free. He kept having big seasons, now the media is loving him lots. So yea, if Ben keeps clean, and overcomes Eli, he's in the clear, IMO.

teegre
01-09-2013, 07:38 PM
Yea, think we're on the same page. BUT, as I began with, if he goes out big, he can overcome, IMO. Look at Ray Lewis. He WAS the MVP, but Disney wanted nothing to do with a killer that walked free. He kept having big seasons, now the media is loving him lots. So yea, if Ben keeps clean, and overcomes Eli, he's in the clear, IMO.

I'll just tell BB to win THREE more SuperBowls, so that it's not even a question. :wink02:

steelfury02
01-09-2013, 07:39 PM
Don't start no shit man! :rofl:

lololol - seemed like a good place for another Marty Ball debate:chuckle::

Darkstorm05
01-09-2013, 07:43 PM
lololol - seemed like a good place for another Marty Ball debate:chuckle::

We can keep the Uncle Charley's if you like. I like their smoked bacon.

steelfury02
01-09-2013, 07:51 PM
We can keep the Uncle Charley's if you like. I like their smoked bacon.

baaaccccooon (Homer Simpson voice)

teegre
01-09-2013, 07:59 PM
baaaccccooon (Homer Simpson voice)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaK9bjLy3v4

desertsteel
01-09-2013, 08:26 PM
Great read and really puts the player and the person into perspective. It really is a turning point in his career. He either has 1-2 more big things he'll accomplish as a Steeler or, his best accomplishments are behind him. Either way, he's a HOF - which echelon of HOFers will he fall into? Time will tell. He'll be one of my favorite Steelers of all time no matter what.

If he puts up 2-3 more above average years he'll be HOF, but not first ballot. Another ring or some gaudy stats and he'll be first ballot IMO.

steelfury02
01-09-2013, 08:34 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaK9bjLy3v4

hilarious - bacon does make everything better

steelfury02
01-09-2013, 08:34 PM
If he puts up 2-3 more above average years he'll be HOF, but not first ballot. Another ring or some gaudy stats and he'll be first ballot IMO.

sounds about right to me

FrancoLambert
01-09-2013, 08:46 PM
Career and legacy crossroads.
If he wins a 3rd Lombardi he's a cinch 1st ballot HOF'er.
If he never wins another, 2 wins with his baggage off the field might not be enough.

JeromeBetties63
01-09-2013, 08:59 PM
I think that is a fair assessment. He doesnt have the huge stats as you point out and in the 3 super bowl's he played.....2 of them he wasnt that great at.

I still think he should be around for the next 5 seasons or more, but the team window on getting to another Super Bowl is closing. All the great supporting cast is getting old and the young guys arent that special so far.

It doesn't matter that he wasn't that great IN two of the Super Bowls. Without him and his play in the regular season and playoffs....the Steelers wouldn't have even sniffed those Super Bowls. Big Ben is the man. He is elite. He is the central piece to every Super Bowl trip in his era and his success will determine whether we get another one or not. FACT. :hatsoff:

zcoop
01-09-2013, 11:36 PM
lololol - seemed like a good place for another Marty Ball debate:chuckle::

:chuckle:

Hawaii 5-0
01-13-2013, 02:31 PM
OC Todd Haley Leaving Pittsburgh Steelers Could Give Ben Roethlisberger Second Chance

1 day ago by Cian Fahey

http://rantsports.media.s3.amazonaws.com/nfl/files/2013/01/Charles-LeClaire-USA-TODAY-Sports-1.png

According to Ed Bouchette, the Pittsburgh Steelers may soon be in the market for a new offensive coordinator as Todd Haley interviews with the Arizona Cardinals for their vacant head coaching position. Haley only arrived in Pittsburgh last year, but was a head coach with Kansas City Chiefs previously as well as an offensive coordinator with the Cardinals before that. Although he hasn’t appeared to endear himself to fans or his quarterback, the Steelers would likely prefer not to have to endure another coaching staff change after just one season.

Should Haley leave, the Steelers will be intent on keeping running backs coach Kirby Wilson, who has also been under consideration for potential roles elsewhere this off-season. Wilson was initially a candidate to be the offensive coordinator last season, but a house fire that hospitalized him took him out of the running. Wilson’s running backs haven’t exactly impressed during his tenure, but he was hired by Mike Tomlin in 2007, which would work in his favor. Much like the Steelers learned with Sean Kugler, it is unwise to use the performance of the player’s being coached to judge the actual work of the coach. Instead it must be clear that the man involved is a good fit in the specific role that needs filling.

If Wilson, or anyone else, is to be fit in the role of offensive coordinator for the Steelers, there are a few alterations that must be made.

Although it wasn’t completely his fault, Haley’s relationship with Ben Roethlisberger was key to the Steelers’ failings this year. Roethlisberger never appeared to buy into the Steelers’ offensive ideal. Haley was brought in to establish the running game and reign in Roethlisberger’s punishment by establishing a short passing game. Because Roethlisberger was blatantly still upset with the release of Bruce Arians, combined with the simple fact that this offense required him to be more disciplined and play an unnatural game, the Steelers never got the best out of him this year.

Not only is Roethlisberger the best offensive player the team has, he is also the best player the team has. Furthermore, as the quarterback, the franchise’s future hangs almost conclusively on what he can do. This is not the Troy Polamalu-era, nor the James Harrison-era. It’s the Ben Roethlisberger-era and the Steelers need to act accordingly. Instead of replacing Haley (presuming he leaves) with someone who can effectively implement the current scheme, the Steelers should seize this second opportunity to accept what Roethlisberger is and play to his strengths.

Under Arians he may have taken too many hits and held onto the ball too long, but he also made plenty of plays and did more than enough to help the Steelers win consistently. Roethlisberger doesn’t have pinpoint accuracy or a great ability to diagnose defenses before or after the snap, but he does have an innate ability to avoid pass rushers and hit receivers on the move. Instead of trying to box him in for his own safety, the Steelers should find an offensive coordinator who will allow him to drop into the shotgun consistently and use three wide receiver sets not to run from, but to repeatedly pass. Much like the Dallas Cowboys use Tony Romo, the Steelers need to put the ball in his hands and look for big plays instead of asking him to act like Tom Brady or Peyton Manning.

Roethlisberger won two Super Bowls by being a play-making quarterback who first complemented a strong running game and then a historically good defense. Ken Whisenhunt and Bill Cowher somewhat limited his impact during his first two seasons, but since then he has never worked well with a leash holding him back. The Steelers can’t try to extend Roethlisberger’s career if that career is one of a mediocre quarterback. Three elite seasons is much more valuable than seven of what was put on show this year.

http://www.rantsports.com/nfl/2013/01/09/todd-haley-could-leave-to-give-pittsburgh-steelers-second-shot-with-ben-roethlisberger/?umE27CQqcD6KLoX5.99

cowherpower
01-13-2013, 04:58 PM
It's telling how the article mentions how he came into the league as this lanky kid, and all these years later he still refuses to hit the weights or do anything to compliment his talent. I have never seen such noodle arms on a man of his size. It's like he hasn't ever lifted ever. I think seeing that, and his seeming lack of reading defenses means to me he doesn't prepare well enough, hearing him whine, and his off the field issues will not help him with HOF. People can say how good he was against ARI but let's not forget the single worst performance by a SB winning QB in the SEA game nor the lackluster effort versus GB. He needs another ring or he doesn't get in.

teegre
01-13-2013, 05:33 PM
It's telling how the article mentions how he came into the league as this lanky kid, and all these years later he still refuses to hit the weights or do anything to compliment his talent. I have never seen such noodle arms on a man of his size. It's like he hasn't ever lifted ever. I think seeing that, and his seeming lack of reading defenses means to me he doesn't prepare well enough, hearing him whine, and his off the field issues will not help him with HOF. People can say how good he was against ARI but let's not forget the single worst performance by a SB winning QB in the SEA game nor the lackluster effort versus GB. He needs another ring or he doesn't get in.

BB's three play-off games before XLV were outstanding (highest QB rating in NFL history).

Plus, HIS promise to get Jerome Bettis a SuperBowl victory kept that team focused & motivated.

Hawaii 5-0
01-16-2013, 12:28 AM
Steelers Under Roethlisberger Average Only 22.6 Points Per Game

Sunday, January 13th, 2013
By Jeremy Hritz

Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin always talks about splash plays, and I wonder if he was watching the divisional playoff games this past Saturday night.

Huge bombs for touchdowns, long special teams returns for scores, pick sixes, quarterback scrambles for TDs, strip sacks: there was definitely no mistaking the Broncos, Ravens, 49ers, or Packers as the Steelers.

Most interesting is that all four of those teams scored at least 31 points, a total that the Steelers only reached once in 2012 in a loss against the Oakland Raiders.

There is no question that if the Steelers are to get back into the playoffs and threaten for a championship again, they are going to have to start scoring points, or at least start scoring points when they need them. However, when examining the total points scored by the Steelers since Ben Roethlisberger took over the helm as the starter, it is curious to see that the Steelers have only averaged 22.6 points per game, hardly a formidable number.

Points Scored by the Steelers Offense with Ben Roethlisberger at Quarterback

Year Average Total Points
2004 23.2 372
2005 24.3 389
2006 22.1 353
2007 24.6 393
2008 21.7 347
2009 23 368
2010 23.4 375
2011 20.3 325
2012 21 336

Average of 22.6 points per game

The statistic to note from these numbers is that Steelers teams under Roethlisberger average only 22.6 points per game. When considering the type of ball-control offense that the Steelers run, the commitment to the running game, and the solid play of the Steelers defense, some of this statistic can be justified, yet as the offense becomes more pass-centric, the responsibility has to shouldered by Roethlisberger and his wide receivers.

As the Steelers move into the offseason almost certainly losing Mike Wallace and without a quality running back, the offense could be in some serious trouble in 2013. The wide receiver corps, which was touted too early as being one of the best in the league, minus Wallace, will feature Antonio Brown, who failed to live up to the expectation he set last season, and Emmanuel Sanders, who can make the big catch, but not without fumbling it away, especially in crucial situations. Without Wallace for defenses to focus on, teams will be able to commit to an already poor Steelers rushing attack, and the likelihood of scoring more than 22 points next season seems tenuous at best.

Outside of Roethlisberger, the Steelers do not have any players on offense that can take the game over and shift momentum, and heading into 2013, they cannot expect addition by subtraction by losing Wallace, or for a different result from run-of-the-mill running backs. Yeah, the offensive line was beat up again this year, but even with Isaac Redman or Jonathan Dwyer behind a consistent offensive line does not strike fear into any opponent.

With salary cap issues and holes at outside and middle linebacker, addressing the lackluster offense will be difficult to do. However, if a viable threat on offense is not added, the Steelers may dip below 22 points per game, unless a youngster can step up and emerge, but we have all seen how that has worked out for the players that have been drafted over the last few years.

Will the Steelers stay conservative and count of the development of their own players, or will they try to solve the cap puzzle and make a move in free agency? History says yes to the conservative approach and no to being aggressive.

Just like their offensive philosophy.

http://www.steelersdepot.com/2013/01/steelers-under-roethlisberger-average-only-22-6-points-per-game/