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I-Want-Troy's-Hair
08-19-2006, 11:52 AM
They were just doing some updates on the NFL Network and talking about how T.O hamstring and how it's overshadowed another wide receivers hamstring. Adam went on to say that all summer long all we've heard about is TO's hamstring and at the same time Ward the steelers wide receiver and the MVP of the last superbowl has missed just as much practice time but we haven't heard anything at all about Wards conditon,

Essentially that could be because Ward hasn't ridden in the Tour 'de France in the Tour Latrobe by Steelers Training camp. There have been no antics by Ward no misbehaving no nothing he has just shown up to practice done his rehab doing EXACTLY what he is supposed to do.

Then they went on to say (chuckling) that Ward doesn't have a book, doesn't have a reality show so it could be the reason why he's not getting that much attention.

That pretty much says it all :iagree:

LambertIsGod58
08-19-2006, 12:15 PM
Ward is the best All-Around receiver in the league!!!

83-Steelers-43
08-19-2006, 12:25 PM
Question. Who would you take?

TO with Ward's attitude, heart, dedication and work ethic. (obviously hypothetical)

or

Ward.

LambertIsGod58
08-19-2006, 12:32 PM
As much as I like Owens as a receiver...I couldn't pass on Ward's heart and dedication.

Black@Gold Forever32
08-19-2006, 12:35 PM
Question. Who would you take?

TO with Ward's attitude and work ethic

or

Ward

Well if TO had Ward's attitude and work ethic. I would say TO hands down. But he doesn't so Hines Ward all the way.

LambertLunatic
08-19-2006, 01:49 PM
Question. Who would you take?

TO with Ward's attitude, heart, dedication and work ethic. (obviously hypothetical)

or

Ward.

I'd go with Ward. Although TO is the better pure pass catcher, Ward's blocking skills are vital to our offense.

Avoid Lloyd
08-19-2006, 01:56 PM
Then they went on to say (chuckling) that Ward doesn't have a book, doesn't have a reality show so it could be the reason why he's not getting that much attention.

He's not an attention seeking douche bag, that's why he hasn't gotten the media coverage.

19ward86
08-19-2006, 03:09 PM
ward is the most underrated reciever in the league, i think he is just plain underrated cause he isnt black, well....this is what i mean, he can jump but not high, he can run but not fast, he can talk but not talk trash. he isnt as athletic as chad johnson or t.o. but he proves what he can do on the field. yeah he didnt get much to work with last year but he achieved great things last season, 14+ yards per catch, and 4.7 after the catch. some recievers in the league have a 15+ yards per catch but only cause the qb only throws bombs to the reciever. i think he is the #2 reciever in the league behind randy moss, but #1 overall. randy has the hands of ward but more athletic, no other reciever has the hands of ward and moss.

lamberts-lost-tooth
08-19-2006, 03:12 PM
Question. Who would you take?

TO with Ward's attitude, heart, dedication and work ethic. (obviously hypothetical)

or Ward.


If you took away T.O.'s ego....selfishness...immaturity....self-destructive beavior...and need for affirmation....all thats left is an athletic empty bag of gummi bears....I'll take Ward

tony hipchest
08-19-2006, 03:16 PM
the thing here is owens has been in the west coast offense his whole career and is moving to a completely different scheme. before camp started parcells warned of this and said owens had alot to learn and alot to catch up on.

ward knows the playbook and system and just needs to get up to game speed. he wont be making mistakes on the field by not practicing.

Haiku_Dirtt
08-19-2006, 03:18 PM
Well if TO had Ward's attitude and work ethic. I would say TO hands down. But he doesn't so Hines Ward all the way.

Agree.

CantStop85
08-19-2006, 05:59 PM
ward is the most underrated reciever in the league, i think he is just plain underrated cause he isnt black, well....this is what i mean, he can jump but not high, he can run but not fast, he can talk but not talk trash.
:sofunny:
Wow, who saw the "because he's not black" card coming?

OX1947
08-19-2006, 06:38 PM
TO is a better reciever then Hines Ward, but Hines Ward is far and away a better football player.

clevestinks
08-20-2006, 08:32 AM
I`m biased so it doesnt count.

Hines is irreplaceable here. He does everything that TO won`t, on and off the field.

TO is possibly the best ball catching WR, in the league. Its to bad he is such a cancer for his teams.

I vote Ward! Hands down!

HometownGal
08-20-2006, 09:24 AM
Question. Who would you take?

TO with Ward's attitude, heart, dedication and work ethic. (obviously hypothetical)

or

Ward.

You can't put silk socks on a hog.

Easy choice. Hines all the way. :smile:

BlackNGold203
08-20-2006, 09:38 AM
You can't put silk socks on a hog.

Easy choice. Hines all the way. :smile:


LMAO....

Ya cant put lipstick on a pig either......:sofunny: :sofunny:

lemme think...

OK..Im done....

WARD

:cool: :cool:

HometownGal
08-20-2006, 09:51 AM
LMAO....

Ya cant put lipstick on a pig either......:sofunny: :sofunny:



LOL! If you could, I think T.O. would choose a lovely shade of chartreuse. :sofunny:

HometownGal
08-20-2006, 09:56 AM
:sofunny:
Wow, who saw the "because he's not black" card coming?

You big silly - don't you know that white men can't jump? :cool:

Hines is bi-racial. Half South Korean and half African American.

On that note, here is a very good read on Hines' visit to South Korea.


http://gunsandbutter.blogspot.com/2006/05/hines-wards-tale-of-american.html

http://www.korealiberator.org/images/Hines%20Ward1.jpg


James Na / guest columnist
Hines Ward's tale of American transcendence

Now that it is May, have Seattleites recovered from the Seahawks' Super Bowl loss? May is also "Asian Pacific American History Month." What does the Super Bowl have anything to do with this ethnic tokenism? Hines Ward, the Super Bowl most valuable player, of course!

Ward's saga made headlines after the Pittsburgh Steelers' victory in February. It had the makings of a mediagenic tale: a child of a broken home, born to a black GI and his Korean wife; a dedicated immigrant mother who worked three menial jobs to support her son; an unselfish player winning the MVP award. Capping it all was Ward's triumphant visit last month to his native South Korea, where he was feted by its president and hailed by the local media as a Korean hero and a symbol of new South Korean multiculturalism.

There were, however, sour grapes. Some multiracial South Koreans, especially those with dark skin, expressed bitterness at all the attention Ward garnered. These mixed Koreans, who still struggle with daily discriminations, think that the Ward story is essentially an American one, impossible in South Korea, despite the rhetoric of Korea's globalization. They fear, probably accurately, that the new awareness will subside shortly.

Underneath the glitzy exterior of economic success and high-tech development, South Korea is still a clannish society that values family ties and ethnic purity. Women who marry American soldiers are derided as "GI princesses"; those who marry blacks are scorned as little better than prostitutes. Mixed children, especially those with African or Southeast Asian ancestry, face taunts, impolite stares, spitting and other indignities. Many drop out of school and become unemployed.

But if Ward's story highlighted the dark side of South Korea's society, it seems to have done little to shed light on ethnic relations in the United States. While the American mainstream media fixate on black-white issues (note the Duke University rape scandal), they pay less attention to the more complicated ethnic mosaic that is our country today.

The black-white fixation fits the leftist stereotype that whites are the oppressors, blacks the victims, and that this is the primary problem of racism today. Ward's case is interesting for those who see beyond this simple construct, because he is a product of two nonwhite ethnic groups considered hostile to each other.

Korean immigrants in the U.S. often bring the prejudices of their own society, and the view that blacks are less developed human beings is pervasive. The Korean bias against blacks tends to emerge as "soft racism" ? from stares and extra vigilance to discrimination in housing and employment (Korean shopkeepers, for example, prefer Latino employees, "because they work harder and don't steal").

In turn, many American blacks, far from being helpless victims of racism, harbor hostility toward Koreans. Much of this hostility is based on economic resentment (the myth that Koreans cheat blacks to become wealthy is found among blacks of all strata) and nativism ("Koreans shouldn't be making money in black neighborhoods"). If Korean prejudice against blacks generally manifests as rudeness, that of blacks against Koreans has taken a violent turn at times: robbery, assault and even occasional pogroms ? most infamously during the Los Angeles riots and the "Boycott Koreans" demonstrations in New York City.

And yet, there he is ? Hines Ward, a product of these two seemingly incompatible communities, a kid who was at once shunned by Koreans, and ashamed of his Korean mother. He is neither one nor the other, but that quintessential American character, a hybrid success story.

Indeed, without any counterproductive social engineering, it is the new generation of Americans that is redrawing this complex ethnic map on its own. Away from urban ethnic enclaves where old habits still persist, young, middle-class families in "tech" cities and suburbs are mixing, mingling and intermarrying.

In a new exurban development outside D.C. where I now live, there are many multiethnic couples, having children who will not be able to identify themselves with a single box on government forms and college applications.

Despite this new reality ? or an old one, given that human beings never existed in discrete, separate categories but along a continuum that belies the imprecise construct of "race" ? the government and other institutions of our society continue to insist on separating us into color-coded tribes that stand in the way of forging our single American-ness.

Isn't it time for "E Pluribus Unum," finally? That is what I saw when Hines Ward won the MVP ? neither a black nor a Korean story, but a tale of American transcendence.