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Hawaii 5-0
03-18-2013, 01:10 AM
Tomlin: Player defections won’t derail Steelers’ expectations

By Alan Robinson
Published: Sunday, March 17, 2013

PHOENIX — Are the salary cap-restrained Steelers beginning a steep and inevitable decline? Coach Mike Tomlin's response is an emphatic no.

Mike Wallace, James Harrison, Keenan Lewis and Rashard Mendenhall are gone from a disappointing team that went 8-8 and, according to some players' postseason comments, was beset by leadership and locker room issues. Already a national perception is building that the Steelers' inability to replace key starters because of their cap issues means the worst is yet to come for a team accustomed to yearly success.

Tomlin, speaking to Pittsburgh media for the first time since the day after the season ended, expects the Steelers to be better — not much worse — in 2013.

What he isn't offering yet is any tangible, here-it-is-on-paper reasons why there is reason for optimism.

“I know what the prognostication is … the reality is we're an 8-8 team, and that's probably more acceptable in some places than it is in our place,” Tomlin said Sunday at the annual NFL meetings. “I hope we've got a scalded group. I believe that we do. I'm not looking to put anyone at ease in that regard. We've got to be better in '13, we've got to do better than in '12, and I think we'll have a group that can do that.”

General manager Kevin Colbert all but shrugged off the departures of Wallace, Lewis and Mendenhall to free agency, saying, “You could also argue that we lost pieces from an 8-8 team.”

“Can we get better? We hope,” Colbert said. “Had we re-signed folks, we were hoping to be better but now that we didn't, we have to find players via free agency and the draft, and we hope to be a better team.”

Tomlin, unaware of Colbert's comments, said losing key players can make a team better because on-the-roster players emerge and others who might not otherwise be drafted are selected.

“We may never replace James, but we'll have an opportunity to strengthen ourselves in other areas and I think that's what you look at when you look at things from a change standpoint,” Tomlin said. “No, we won't be able to replace James Harrison, no we won't be able to replace Mike Wallace; those guys are who they are. But those voids will allow us to strengthen ourselves in those areas and others. Collectively maybe even make us stronger.”

As for the players to come, Tomlin said emphatically the Steelers must add a running back. Ahmad Bradshaw, a former 1,000-yard rusher with the Giants, is reportedly interested in them.

“There might be some (free agents) we didn't think we had a chance at and, all of a sudden, the market changes and it becomes a discussion,” Colbert said.

Tomlin also said:

• The Steelers have plenty of leaders left despite shedding James Farrior, Hines Ward, Aaron Smith and Harrison in the last 13 months. He said, “I don't think we're devoid of leadership at all.”

• He expects Jason Worilds, a part-time player to date, to more than adequately replace Harrison. “We'll see what Jason Worilds is capable of doing,” Tomlin said.

Then, he added, laughing, “No pressure.”

http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/3656050-74/tomlin-team-steelers#ixzz2NrE5sqVL

bl4ckng0ld
03-18-2013, 01:56 AM
Honestly, it's all true and it's a good way to look at it. I really did like all the players we lost, but it was inevitable.

Wallace did not play well last year, he dropped balls, fumbled and was wildly inconsistent.

Mendenhall hardly played and when he did, he was also a fumble machine.

Lewis had a strong year, but so did Ike and Cortez. I think we are okay there.

Harrison was injured, but had a good second half of the season. Losing him hurts the most, but you never know what next year could be like for him.

I agree with Colbert. Could just be losing parts of the 8-8 team that were dragging us down more than helping us for the future.

teegre
03-18-2013, 02:10 AM
Hawaii, this is your best sig-mock yet.

1) Tavon Austin WR/KR W Virginia
2a) Matt Elam S Florida
2b) Corey Lemonier OLB Auburn
3) Le'Veon Bell RB Mich St
4a) Leon McFadden CB S Diego St

If you had Gavin Escobar as your 4b), it would have EVERY player that I covet.

Hawaii 5-0
03-18-2013, 02:17 AM
Hawaii, this is your best sig-mock yet.

1) Tavon Austin WR/KR W Virginia
2a) Matt Elam S Florida
2b) Corey Lemonier OLB Auburn
3) Le'Veon Bell RB Mich St
4a) Leon McFadden CB S Diego St

If you had Gavin Escobar as your 4b), it would have EVERY player that I covet.

I had Dion Sims because Tomlin had dinner with him, but what the hell...anything for you my friend! :drink:

kan_t
03-18-2013, 02:43 AM
“There might be some (free agents) we didn't think we had a chance at and, all of a sudden, the market changes and it becomes a discussion,” Colbert said.

http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/3656050-74/tomlin-team-steelers#ixzz2NrE5sqVL
I hope he's talking about Elvis Dumervil.

Steel_Bus_24
03-18-2013, 02:58 AM
I hope he's taking about Elvis Dumervil.


obviously he was speaking about how fortunate it was that we could afford Big Play William Gay and David Johnson again.......Why even play the season, they should just hand us #7 right now

Hawaii 5-0
03-18-2013, 03:07 AM
Change can provide new opportunities

Teresa Varley
Steelers.com

Every NFL player shares the same feeling, that they have what it takes to be a starter in the league. That if they are given the opportunity, they can get the job done.

But there are often obstacles in front of them, and for Steelers’ linebacker Jason Worilds, that obstacle has been James Harrison, the Pro Bowl linebacker who has started ahead of him since he was a rookie.

Things have changed though. Harrison was released earlier this month, and that has opened a whole new world for Worilds. He now has every opportunity to prove he can handle the job and be that starter come September.

“I believe that Jason Worilds is chomping at the bit to prove he is capable of being that,” said Steelers’ Coach Mike Tomlin from the NFL owners meetings in Phoenix, Arizona. “When I first got to Pittsburgh in 2007, and we had to let go of Joey Porter, there was a guy that came in my office that was ready to prove that he was capable of 900-1,000 snaps a year. His name was James Harrison.

“We will see what Worilds is capable of doing.”

And with a laugh, he added, “No pressure.”

Worilds, who started two games at left outside linebacker last year when LaMarr Woodley was injured, hasn’t been in the spotlight like Woodley and Harrison, but don’t doubt for a minute he hasn’t been continuously learning and growing.

“I think if we all knew what James Harrison was capable of he would have played more than he did before 2007,” said Tomlin. “But that’s what this is. That’s what change does. It provides opportunities for guys to ascend and take advantage of opportunities, and to carve out a niche or a name for themselves. I think that these competitors are challenged by that or encouraged by those opportunities that change presents.”

Worilds, as well as cornerback Cortez Allen who could take advantage of the departure of free agent Keenan Lewis to New Orleans, understands the importance of seizing every opportunity that comes his way.

“My main focus has always been to get better every time I step on the field,” said Worilds, the fourth-year linebacker. “My all around game has gotten better. I am more comfortable in my assignments, so I don’t just go out there and not make a mistake, but go out there and make a play. I have been fortunate enough to transition easily from defensive end in college to an outside linebacker. You have to know your position, where to be and how it affects the man next to you. You have to know how important it is for you to do your job and the way you do your job. I want to do the right things, at the right time and the right way.

“Barring a few nagging injuries I have been able to do that and get better. I hope the coaches realize that and know I am going to continue to do so. That is my goal.”

Tomlin understands that there are going to be changes in 2013, with Harrison, Lewis and wide receiver Mike Wallace three starters who are now gone, along with running back Rashard Mendenhall, a long-time starter whose playing time decreased last season when he started only four games.

“It’s a challenge but it’s a challenge that is part of our business,” said Tomlin. “It’s a challenge that I embrace. I think every year when the ingredients change, particularly significant ones, it’s a coaching challenge. It’s part of the game itself. Of course, we will be building it with some new ingredients in critical areas. It’s up to us to make it come together. I am looking forward to that.

“I think any time there is a change, whether a replacement is in house or not, there’s a certain amount of urgency that goes with that transition, and guys having to step up and deliver. I haven’t pondered that from that standpoint of whether or not the answers are in house or not. The reality is that change is taking place, and it’s something we better be prepared to deal with.”

Tomlin also addressed a variety of other topics at the owners meetings, including the following:

* Tomlin said nothing is happening right now with wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders, a restricted free agent who visited the New England Patriots, but despite reports did not receive an offer sheet from them.

“As of right now, he doesn’t have an offer, so it’s a moot point,” said Tomlin. “That’s something we will address as an organization if the situation develops. But based on the information we have right now, it’s no news.”

* After finishing 8-8, and losing multiple starters, Tomlin said he isn’t worried about the perception that the team is weaker now than they were at the end of the 2012 season.

“I’m not overly concerned in that regard,” said Tomlin. “I know prognostication is what it is. I’m more concerned about building with the group of men that we are assembling right now, and seeing how that goes. I don’t have a feel for that as we sit here today. We haven’t started the building process in terms of phase one in our offseason conditioning program. I think that’s when you can really start to get the feel of the components that are coming together, and of course after the draft, particularly as you move into OTAs, it will become clearer.

“Right now, we are just focused on the task that is in front of us, which is free agency and draft preparation.”

* With the departure of Wallace via free agency to the Miami Dophins, wide receiver is definitely a position that the Steelers will be looking to strengthen, but not the only one.

“We are trying to add talent at all positions,” said Tomlin. “Obviously, wide receiver is one of them. When you lose a guy the caliber of Mike Wallace – we want to continually add to the talent at our depth. So we will have the opportunity to do that in a variety of fashions this spring, the draft being the primary one, but also recognizing that we are capable of doing something in free agency as well.”

Tomlin added that while they will be looking to plug some holes, finding replacements for starters via free agency could be tough because of the salary cap.

“I think there is a desire to assemble the very best team we can assemble but obviously, we deal in a world of realism,” said Tomlin. “We have some constraints from a salary cap standpoint that could limit some of those thoughts. I am not a big dreamer in that regard. I don’t spend a lot of time looking at things that aren’t practical. I approach it from the mindset of the constraints in which we are working from a salary cap standpoint, what is available to us, and of course how that measures with the draft talent.”

Wallace, Lewis and Mendenhall signed deals that combined were worth over $90 million, something that Tomlin understands is part of the game.

“That’s the NFL,” said Tomlin. “I think that’s what makes it an exciting product. Teams have an opportunity to ascend and get better and acquire talent. The system is put in place that creates parity. We are challenged to acquire new talent, to continue to develop the talent that we have and that’s something we embrace.

“It’s also a source of pride, when you see guys like Mike Wallace and Keenan Lewis, who are third-round picks, develop into the types of players that they have developed into, and move on to new challenges. Hopefully we will acquire some new talent that helps those guys grow and develop in similar ways.”

* Tomlin said the team will definitely be looking to add another running back. Restricted free agent Jonathan Dwyer already signed his tender offer, but Mendenhall left via free agency to sign with the Arizona Cardinals, and Isaac Redman is a restricted free agent who has yet to sign his tender. He didn’t say it would definitely be a feature back that is signed as it’s all based on who is available.

“It just depends on what we get, what works and how it comes together,” said Tomlin. “But obviously, we need to add to the pool of talent that we have at that position.”

* Tomlin is well aware of comments made by several of his players and others, claiming that there were issues in the locker room last year. Tomlin doesn’t believe that there is a major problem, but rather frustration from finishing the season with a disappointing 8-8 record.

“I heard about it second hand,” said Tomlin. “For me, the reality of it is we were an 8-8 team and that’s probably more acceptable in some places than it is in our place. I hope that we’ve got a scalded group. I believe that we do. I’m not looking to put anyone at ease in that regard. We’ve got to get better in ’13 and we’ve got to do better, obviously, than we did in ’12. I think that we will have a group that’s geared toward that.”

Tomlin believes that despite losing several leaders over the last few years, that the team still has plenty of leadership in the locker room.

“I don’t think we’re devoid of leadership at all,” said Tomlin. “We’ve got some quality, veteran players that know how to play, but beyond that they’re good teammates. They know what championship-caliber team building is about. They put the good of the group in front of their own personal good. I think we’ve got great examples of quality leadership on our football team. We were 8-8 in 2012 and none of us liked that. Obviously, there are certain things that kind of come along with that and we’re going to embrace it.”

* Tomlin said it was a tough decision releasing Harrison, who brought a lot to the team during his Pro Bowl career.

“James is a special guy and was a special player for us,” said Tomlin. “It is a part of the business. We may never replace James but we will have an opportunity to strengthen ourselves in other areas. I think that’s what you look at sometimes when you look at some of the things that have happened from a change standpoint. No, we won’t be able to replace James. No, we won’t be able to replace Mike Wallace. Those guys are who they are. But those voids will provide opportunities for us to strengthen ourselves in those areas and in others, and collectively maybe even make us stronger. I think that’s an approach I always take to change. That’s why I view it somewhat optimistically.”

http://www.steelers.com/news/article-1/Change-can-provide-new-opportunities/a5efd883-9f3b-48a6-9e47-c85fbe0db47a

Steeldude
03-18-2013, 05:55 AM
It is a part of the business. We may never replace James but we will have an opportunity to strengthen ourselves in other areas

So far it weakened the LB corps and strengthened nothing. What other area has become stronger with the release of Harrison? Where is the chance of strengthening? They signed Spaeth and re-signed Foote. They couldn't sign Connor or Butler.

Fire Haley
03-18-2013, 08:18 AM
a few woo-hoos! and chest bumps and Tomlin will have everyone believing again

teegre
03-18-2013, 08:34 AM
I had Dion Sims because Tomlin had dinner with him, but what the hell...anything for you my friend! :drink:

You are the best, brother. :drink:

OX1947
03-18-2013, 10:56 AM
Oh god, if I have to hear this shit after every loss again next year Im gonna yack.

Terminator
03-18-2013, 12:16 PM
Tomlin is the biggest mouth-piece ever. I wish he would be quiet.

wwhickok
03-18-2013, 12:31 PM
He can expect Worilds to be "more than adequate to replace Harrison" all he wants. Doesnt mean Worilds will be and frankly I doubt he will be.

Frankly Tomlin is praying to God he is because Tomlin is the reason we didnt draft Sean Lee.

tony hipchest
03-18-2013, 12:48 PM
Frankly Tomlin is praying to God he is because Tomlin is the reason we didnt draft Sean Lee.tomlin doesnt run the draft.

it is equal parts owner, GM, HC with educated insight from position coaches and our talented scouting dept.

wwhickok
03-18-2013, 12:56 PM
tomlin doesnt run the draft.

it is equal parts owner, GM, HC with educated insight from position coaches and our talented scouting dept.

Im guessing you didnt read the article not long ago about Worilds vs. Sean Lee. The FO was set to draft Sean Lee until Tomlin reportedly stepped in and changed their minds. If the Worilds project doesnt work out he will look like an idiot.

steeltheone
03-18-2013, 01:15 PM
Im guessing you didnt read the article not long ago about Worilds vs. Sean Lee. The FO was set to draft Sean Lee until Tomlin reportedly stepped in and changed their minds. If the Worilds project doesnt work out he will look like an idiot.

Sean Lee has been a real success ???:noidea:

BowCatShot
03-18-2013, 02:22 PM
Tomlin also said:

"If your parents didn't have any kids then the chances are you won't either."

wwhickok
03-18-2013, 02:24 PM
Sean Lee has been a real success ???:noidea:

Have you watched him play? I'm not calling him Patrick Willis but yes he has been fairly successful and he ha very good leadership skills.

OX1947
03-18-2013, 03:07 PM
Tomlin also said:

"If your parents didn't have any kids then the chances are you won't either."

Ya, and Bob Costas said if football didnt exist, there would never be and helmet to helmet hits that result in concussions.

pczach
03-18-2013, 04:27 PM
I gotta tell you. If I spoke with a microphone stuck in my face constantly, I would be saying incredibly stupid stuff all the time! :sofunny:

Why am I getting the feeling nobody is surprised by my last statement?

FrancoLambert
03-18-2013, 05:08 PM
Sean Lee has been a real success ???:noidea:

Yes. Before he got hurt he was the Cowboys best defensive player.

FrancoLambert
03-18-2013, 05:16 PM
tomlin doesnt run the draft.

it is equal parts owner, GM, HC with educated insight from position coaches and our talented scouting dept.

But he wanted Worilds and lobbied hard for him.
This is it for Worilds, it's his position to lose. Produce or be gone.

The other LB he supposedly pushed very hard for was Sylvester. That's not working out so well.

jiminpa
03-18-2013, 07:47 PM
Addition by subtraction is when you lose guys like David Johnson, and Dwyer, not when you chase off guys who belong in an NFL uniform to make room for a fifth string caliber TE and practice squad RB. NOW this is Tomlin's team. The good news is that maybe some of these people who are only here to bash the Rooneys and the real fans will jump onto the browns bandwagon.

pczach
03-18-2013, 07:58 PM
Addition by subtraction is when you lose guys like David Johnson, and Dwyer, not when you chase off guys who belong in an NFL uniform to make room for a fifth string caliber TE and practice squad RB. NOW this is Tomlin's team. The good news is that maybe some of these people who are only here to bash the Rooneys and the real fans will jump onto the browns bandwagon.

Okaaayyyyy?:noidea:

Hawaii 5-0
03-18-2013, 08:02 PM
The good news is that maybe some of these people who are only here to bash the Rooneys and the real fans will jump onto the browns bandwagon.

the Brownies have a bandwagon to jump onto?

http://media.cleveland.com/shaw_impact/photo/brownsledehorizjkjpg-7172dfea65452003_large.jpg

tony hipchest
03-18-2013, 09:16 PM
But he wanted Worilds and lobbied hard for him.
This is it for Worilds, it's his position to lose. Produce or be gone.

The other LB he supposedly pushed very hard for was Sylvester. That's not working out so well.

sounds like a bunch of fan and media speak if you ask me.

i guess tomlin also "pushed very hard" for the likes of thad gibson, keyron fox, and bruce davis.

infact, im willing to bet he dug in his heels at the prospects of drafting woodley, timmons, and promoting james harrison to starting LB while letting porter walk.

teh draft is a hit and miss science. its not like he spent top 10 picks on busts like vernon gholston or aaron curry/maybin.

TheVet
03-18-2013, 10:39 PM
tomlin doesnt run the draft.

it is equal parts owner, GM, HC with educated insight from position coaches and our talented scouting dept.

No, Tomlin doesn't run the draft. But he has a lot of input, and the drafts have sure been mediocre during his tenure here. Not saying he's responsible, but we need better than C+. Because the substandard should not be the standard.

TheVet
03-18-2013, 10:42 PM
Addition by subtraction is when you lose guys like David Johnson, and Dwyer, not when you chase off guys who belong in an NFL uniform to make room for a fifth string caliber TE and practice squad RB. NOW this is Tomlin's team. The good news is that maybe some of these people who are only here to bash the Rooneys and the real fans will jump onto the browns bandwagon.

lol, real steelers fans are jumping on the browns bandwagon now.

Hawaii 5-0
03-19-2013, 07:35 PM
Tomlin on physical football: "It's a mentality"

Teresa Varley
Steelers.com

Physical. It’s a word that goes hand-in-hand with football, and when you are talking Steelers’ football, it’s a word that is commonly used to describe the team’s style of play.

Coach Mike Tomlin embraces the description, he welcomes the fact that his team is known for that style, and he shared his thoughts on what makes the team physical at the AFC coaches’ breakfast at the NFL owners meeting on Tuesday.

“One that’s combative. I think that is a word I look for in regards to being physical,” said Tomlin. “Putting together a team that is combative and one that doesn’t run away from combat situations or circumstances, I believe that year-in and year-out we are capable of producing that kind of team.”

Being physical in Tomlin’s mind isn’t always about who is tougher or stronger, it’s about much more than that.

“I just think it’s a mentality more than anything else,” said Tomlin. “We understand that there is going to be confrontation in the game of professional football, and we are not running away from it.”

The NFL has made rule changes over the last few years, including one that protects a defenseless receiver, which could hurt a team that has a physical style of play. While Tomlin acknowledges the rules have had an impact, he also said they aren’t a detriment.

“I just think that the winds have changed,” said Tomlin. “They are what they are. Player safety is a legitimate initiative, and we are going to support that. But at the same time, we believe we are capable of being physical and combative and distinguishing ourselves in that way.”

The AFC North as a whole, with Baltimore, Cincinnati and Cleveland, has become known as one of the more physical divisions in the NFL, with intense rivalries inside its own walls as well as outside. Tomlin agrees with the assessment of the division, but also understands the teams have to be competitive to keep that reputation alive.

“Obviously it depends on the teams that we field year-in and year-out, throughout the division,” said Tomlin. “We believe that we are as tough a division as there is in football.

“The North is the North. We take a great deal of pride in being in the North. I love the North. I think that we take a great deal of pride in how ball is played. We think that it’s significant. We think that a lot of what goes down in the AFC and the NFL, in general, is determined by how the North unfolds.”

The Steelers-Ravens rivalry has easily become not just one of the most intense in the AFC North, but in the NFL as a whole, and a rivalry Tomlin enjoys.

“I think that the Steelers/Ravens rivalry is one of the interesting things in sports,” said Tomlin. “I think our fans dig their teeth into it. I think they understand what it means. You have two teams that are angling toward a similar goal. In the midst of that, there is going to be fireworks, and we aren’t going to apologize for it.”

Tomlin was also asked about a variety of other topics, including the following:

Steelers and Ravens possibly moving back into the pack because of losing key free agents:
“That’s March talk. I am not going to try to combat March talk. It is what it is. I will see you at stadiums in the fall.”

Free agency being overrated:
“I respect free agency. It’s an opportunity to get better. I think it excites organizations. I think it excites their fans. It’s an opportunity to level the playing field. But again, I don’t want to overstate that. Teams are going to take the field in the fall and put their best foot forward. I look forward to doing that with our group.”

What did you like about Bruce Gradkowski?
“He’s a fiery competitor. I have had the pleasure of competing against him and seeing him do his thing. That’s one thing you can’t question about him. He’s a football junkie. He’s a fiery competitor and those are things that we value.”

Losing so many close games last season:
“We weren’t good enough. I don’t hide from that. I embrace that. It is what it is. I think that good teams win close games. Teams that aren’t lose those games. Obviously, we did a year ago. Our goal and our charge moving forward is to be on the other side of that.”

Do you think Ben Roethlisberger rushed back last season when he came back from injury?
“I don’t. From a health standpoint I think he was ready to go. Obviously, I think he wished he could have played better. I know that we do. In hindsight, you can ask those types of questions. But I think in the moment, he was ready and prepared to play. We just didn’t get what we were looking for.”

Proposed running back rule:
“I think it’s obvious that we all want those types of plays out of the game. For me, it’s about how do we officiate it. Really, that’s probably the same for a lot of the rules. In spirit, they are obviously great rules that are intended for the good of the game but officiating it is another thing. I think that is probably the discussion as we gathered here in Arizona.”

Is this a rule where there will be a big gray area?
“I think that’s what we are trying to avoid, the gray. I think that we are talking about the obvious foul. I think that is a word that has been used here quite a bit in regards to it, obvious. So we are trying to look for black and white as opposed to gray in regards to that.”

Todd Haley’s first season as offensive coordinator and the offense evolving this season:
“I do and really kind of for obvious reasons. I think that being familiar and getting a certain amount of exposure to it, it’s going to bring comfort. But we can’t relax in that comfort. We have to continue to move forward as a unit. I thought we did some good things, particularly initially. I thought we waned down the stretch. I look forward to putting the pieces together and trying to be the best we can be in 2013.”

How much time do you think defensive coordinators are spending on defending the read option?
“I think the read option is the flavor of the month. We will see whether it’s the flavor of the year. A few years ago, people were talking wildly about the Wildcat. There’s less of a discussion now. I think that there are coaches in rooms preparing themselves to defend it, coaches in rooms that are also preparing themselves to run it, and I think it is going to sort out on the grass. I look forward to it.”

In general, where do you see the state of your team as we sit here in March?
“We’re a team in transition, as we always are. Players are ascending, players are descending. We’re acquiring players and losing players. I think that’s part of this time of year. I think that includes some unfortunate transactions, if you will, and you can characterize James (Harrison) as that. We respect what he’s done throughout his career in Pittsburgh, but we also acknowledge that change is part of football and we look forward to moving forward with a new a cast of characters that will be challenged to deliver in ways that he did.”

You are true to a core belief where the names can change, the players can change but you stay true to that, correct?

“Yes, we’re looking to impose our will on our opponents, as I’m sure our opponents are looking to impose their will upon us, but we don’t run away from that argument or discussion. That’s something that we embrace and we’re trying to strengthen ourselves for that this time of year.”

http://www.steelers.com/news/article-1/Tomlin-on-physical-football-Its-a-mentality/88fe877b-aa69-417c-b0af-3f3130cc8d43

jb500ex
03-19-2013, 10:06 PM
Sean Lee has been a real success ???:noidea:

hes better then any ilb we have.

BLACK_AND_YELLOW
03-19-2013, 11:09 PM
hes better then any ilb we have.

Better than Timmons? Um NO....Foote? yes

Hawaii 5-0
03-20-2013, 01:33 AM
Tomlin says Steelers are ‘team in transition’

By Alan Robinson
Published: Tuesday, March 19, 2013

http://triblive.com/csp/mediapool/sites/dt.common.streams.StreamServer.cls?STREAMOID=u6_ne nOpFJAo5$FLVUkqvM$daE2N3K4ZzOUsqbU5sYtbdrj$M_IADTj fw5px5JSsWCsjLu883Ygn4B49Lvm9bPe2QeMKQdVeZmXF$9l$4 uCZ8QDXhaHEp3rvzXRJFdy0KqPHLoMevcTLo3h8xh70Y6N_U_C ryOsw6FTOdKL_jpQ-&CONTENTTYPE=image/jpeg

PHOENIX — James Harrison, Mike Wallace, Keenan Lewis, Rashard Mendenhall, Willie Colon, Hines Ward, James Farrior and Aaron Smith departed the Steelers in the last 13 months — a huge chunk of their multiple Super Bowl teams gone.

To coach Mike Tomlin, those departures mean the Steelers are in transition, changing from one configuration to another.

Even if general manager Kevin Colbert said recently they weren't.

During the AFC coaches media gathering Tuesday at the annual NFL meetings, Tomlin said, “We're a team in transition as we always are. Players are ascending, players are descending. We're acquiring players and losing players. I think that's part of this time of year. ... Change is a part of football.”

Both Tomlin and Colbert agree they're not altering expectations. Asked about all the talk that the Steelers are on the decline following an 8-8 season, Tomlin said with a bit of defiance, “That's March talk. See you at stadiums in the fall.”

But during some February talk at the NFL Scouting Combine, Colbert took umbrage at characterizing the Steelers as being in transition, saying that suggests they would settle for less-than-championship play while they alter their cast of characters.

“I don't want to say transition because that means that you're going to accept anything less than a Super Bowl in trying to get back,” Colbert said.

No matter what word characterizes the state of the team, Tomlin knows what the 2013 Steelers must do differently from their 8-8 season: win close games.

“Because we weren't good enough. I don't hide from that. I embrace that,” Tomlin said when asked about the Steelers' five losses by 3 points. “Good teams win close games. Teams that aren't lose those games. Obviously, we did a year ago. Our goal and our charge moving forward is to be on the other side of that.”

A productive, content Ben Roethlisberger and a healthy, contributing Troy Polamalu could help achieve that.

Tomlin doesn't believe Roethlisberger returned prematurely from the shoulder and chest injuries that put him out for three midseason games and appeared to limit the quality and velocity of his throwing the rest of the season. But Tomlin acknowledged the quarterback's play wasn't what the Steelers needed as they lost three in a row to fall out of playoff contention after Roethlisberger returned.

“I think in the moment he was ready and prepared to play. We just didn't get what we were looking for,” Tomlin said.

Tomlin got what he was looking for early on during Todd Haley's first season as offensive coordinator but not late in the season as the running game disappeared and Roethlisberger didn't play up to his usual level. As a result, the head coach is looking for offensive improvement all around in Year 2, especially after the Steelers add the running back he is pushing for — and hard.

“I think that being familiar and continuing to gain understanding is what's going to make us successful not only offensively but as a team,” Tomlin said of the Haley-Roethlisberger relationship. “I think that process is unfolding. Both guys are geared towards winning, and they're unselfish from that standpoint. I'm excited about watching it continue to grow.”

As for Polamalu, who missed much of last season with a torn calf, Tomlin gave a brief but telling answer when asked if the star safety should alter his offseason workout regimen.

“I want him to be ready. I think he wants to be ready like everyone,” Tomlin said. “I am not going to make more out of that than what it is.”

Especially when he has a team that's in transition. Or isn't.

http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/3685449-74/tomlin-steelers-season#ixzz2O2zUEJHk

OX1947
03-20-2013, 01:40 AM
When I listen or read Tomlin quotes, am I the only one that has to go to the bathroom immediately after? Or am I being obtuse?

MACH1
03-20-2013, 01:51 AM
When I listen or read Tomlin quotes, am I the only one that has to go to the bathroom immediately after? Or am I being obtuse?

As long as you embrace it. :chuckle:

Hawaii 5-0
04-18-2013, 09:05 PM
The Steelers’ Standard: Is there a contradiction?

By PaVaSteeler on Apr 14 2013

http://cdn2.sbnation.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/11493705/gyi0063176386.0_standard_500.0.jpg

Is there a contradiction between how Steelers Chairman Dan Rooney and his head coach Mike Tomlin view The Standard, and if so does that portend a deeper division within the Steelers organization?

As with anything in life, the meaning of a phrase such as Steelers HC Mike Tomlin's "The Standard is the Standard" is a matter of perspective.

While not as unique as his other phrases which have become known as Tomlinisms, the mantra oft repeated by the six year head coach on its surface appears to mirror similar words of other coaches past and present who speak of "the next man up". However, given Tomlin's unique ability to turn a phrase, The Standard has become more than a run-of-the-mill team's saying, especially in light of the legacy of consistency and excellence the Steelers have created since 1970. Steeler Nation generally accepts Tomlin's version to mean the same thing as "...in case of injury to the starter, the Steelers expect the next player in line to uphold the standard of play as a replacement."

Steelers' Chairman Dan Rooney's was recently quoted by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazettte's Ed Bouchette in reference to Tomlin's mantra as stating:

"Coaches will say, 'We have to play with what we have and guys are supposed to step in.' You can't say that you're trying to build up a young guy in his first or second year and get him to be able to play; you can't say that if you get your first-line guy hurt that you're going to put one of these guys in here and they'll play the same."

Who is right, Chairman Rooney or Mike Tomlin?

In the most recent publication of his outstanding "5 Burning Questions" series, Hombre de Acero posed the question of who is right between these two men and their seemingly contradictory perceptions.

Chairman Rooney's take on the mantra and his explicitly worded answer on what can be expected from young second string players appears to contradict the commonly held understanding of what Tomlin means by The Standard, and as such appears to call into question whether Tomlin's expectations towards the caliber of play of the younger backup players are realistic. If so, such a divergence could suggest that a deeper philosophical difference exists between the owners and the coaching staff regarding the fundamental approach the two groups hold towards building and maintaining a playoff caliber team.

When Mike Tomlin utters the words "the Standard is the Standard" in response to questions asked about injuries to specific starters and his expectations of the second stringers he will have replacing them, is Tomlin really implying that he expects the replacement to play at the same level as those they replace, as apparently contradicted by Chairman Rooneys statement?

Or could it be that Tomlin, in a rhetorical equivalent to aikido, is controlling the thrust of the reporter's question by turning its focus on the individual aside in a tacit acknowledgement that the Steelers are going to suffer a downgrade in performance with that particular player, and in a counter thrust is using the force of such a question to instead to deliver a message to the rest of the starters who are playing that it is incumbent upon them (and not the replacement player) to step up their game in order for the overall team's expected standard caliber of play not to suffer from the absence of the injured player?

Implicit in this supposition is The Standard's Schrödinger Cat - like state of existence in which it is both Tomlin's expectation of a continuance of excellence regardless of the presence of second stringers replacing starters as well as the Chairman's expectation that replacement players are not expected to be as good as the starters. In other words, The Standard means the Steelers (as a team) are expected to uphold the standard of winning no matter which Steeler players are on the field.

This perception of The Standard does not imply that the replacement players are expected to be just as good as the starter, but rather the Steelers in a collective effort by the remaining 52 players must come together and overcome the added burden imposed by an injured comrade in order for the standard level of performance expected of the team as a whole is maintained.

Even while acknowledging the eventual Super Bowl winning Baltimore Ravens were at their nadir when the two teams played their second game of the 2012 season, the fact that the Steelers were able to defeat the Ravens while using a third string quarterback behind a patchwork offensive line and discombobulated rushing attack illustrates almost perfectly the duality of The Standard; thirty-seven year old third string Charlie Batch was not expected to perform to The Standard of franchise quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, and he didn't. But the Steelers were expected to perform to The Standard of the Steelers and they did, defeating the Ravens 23-20 in Baltimore.

There is no contradiction between how the two men view the Steelers' "The Standard". Rather, both men's perspective on The Standard are right, and are not mutually exclusive; it all comes down to what perspective you are taking when considering the context of the meaning of The Standard.

http://www.behindthesteelcurtain.com/2013/4/14/4222478/steelers-dan-rooney-mike-tomlin-suspensions

casteeler
04-18-2013, 11:09 PM
When I listen or read Tomlin quotes, am I the only one that has to go to the bathroom immediately after? Or am I being obtuse?

Obtuse. Ha,Shawshank Redemption:applaudit:

teegre
04-18-2013, 11:15 PM
When I listen or read Tomlin quotes, am I the only one that has to go to the bathroom immediately after? Or am I being obtuse?

That depends on what you do once you go into the bathroom. :wink02:

OX1947
04-19-2013, 03:06 AM
That depends on what you do once you go into the bathroom. :wink02:

I drop an obDUECE.

VaDave
04-19-2013, 11:44 AM
In your search for truth of the standard, in some bathrooms, you may find an American Standard plumbing fixture

Buddha Bus
04-19-2013, 11:47 AM
In your search for truth of the standard, in some bathrooms, you may find an American Standard plumbing fixture

The Standard is the standard. :sofunny:

teegre
04-19-2013, 11:49 AM
The Standard is the standard. :sofunny:

Why do you hate Moen??? You toilet-ist!!!

Buddha Bus
04-19-2013, 11:51 AM
Why do you hate Moen??? You toilet-ist!!!


Because they are white trash.

teegre
04-19-2013, 04:19 PM
Because they are white trash.

White??? My house has the Jackson Pollock model.

Buddha Bus
04-19-2013, 04:20 PM
White??? My house has the Jackson Pollock model.

All shades of fall colors, I assume?

teegre
04-19-2013, 04:21 PM
All shades of fall colors, I assume?

It's named "The Chocolate Dalmation."

Buddha Bus
04-19-2013, 04:23 PM
:toofunny: :rofl:

TheVet
04-20-2013, 06:21 AM
When I listen or read Tomlin quotes, am I the only one that has to go to the bathroom immediately after? Or am I being obtuse?

No, you're not the only one; I do too. But it's because Tomlin has a tendency to misuse big words, and sometimes it makes me ill to listen to it. And let's face it, the words aren't really all that incredibly big. I think we can all acknowledge that.

Hawaii 5-0
04-20-2013, 03:40 PM
https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/s480x480/311304_492069660841498_696658162_n.jpg