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View Full Version : my anti-theism is coming out tonight


Vis
04-29-2013, 06:12 PM
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JonM229
04-29-2013, 06:26 PM
WYsREU906fw

Vis
04-29-2013, 06:29 PM
Lawrence Krauss: It amazes me that people have pre-existing notions that defy the evidence of reality. But that they hold onto them so dearly. And one of them is the notion of creationism, or. in fact, Senator Marco Rubio, who’s presumably a reasonably intelligent man and maybe even educated, was asked what’s the age of the Earth, and ultimately, either because he actually believed it or he was trying to appeal to some constituency, had to argue that it’s a big mystery, that somehow we should teach kids both ideas, that the Earth is 6,000 years old and that it’s 4.55 billion years old, which is what it is.

If you think about that, somehow saying that, well, anything goes, we shouldn't offend religious beliefs by requiring kids to know - to understand reality; that’s child abuse. And if you think about it, teaching kids - or allowing the notion that the earth is 6,000 years old to be promulgated in schools is like teaching kids that the distance across the United States is 17 feet. That’s how big an error it is.

Now you might say, look, a lot of people believe that, so don’t we owe it to them to allow their views to be present in school? Well, as I’ve often said, the purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. Fifty percent of the people in the United States, when we probe them each year with the National Science Foundation, think that the sun goes around the Earth, not that the Earth goes around the sun. When we asked the question - we provide the question: The Earth goes around the sun and takes a year to do it; true or false? Almost every year, 50 percent of the people get that wrong.

Now, does that mean in schools we should allow the anti-Galilean and Copernican idea that the sun goes around the Earth to be taught? Absolutely not. If, in fact, the very fact that people don’t know that, and the very fact that enough people are willing to somehow believe that Earth is 6,000 years old, means we have to do a better job of teaching physics and biology, not a worse job.

The last thing we want to do is water down the teaching of biology because some people don’t recognize that evolution happened. Evolution is the basis of modern biology and, in fact, if a lot of people don’t believe it, it only means we have to do a better job teaching it. So once again, I repeat, the purpose of education is not to validate ignorance, but to overcome it. And to overcome a situation where a United States Senator can speak such manifest nonsense with impunity is vitally important to the healthy future of our society.

Technology and biotechnology will be the basis of our economic future. And if we allow nonsense to be promulgated in the schools, we do a disservice to our students, a disservice to our children, and we’re guaranteeing that they will fall behind in a competitive world that depends upon a skilled workforce able to understand and manipulate technology and science.

JonM229
04-29-2013, 07:03 PM
But, what does the "Science Guy" think about Creationism?

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Quackjack
04-29-2013, 07:25 PM
Late to the Atheist party bro ;)

Vis
04-30-2013, 08:41 AM
You know, it's silly to say I don't like God because I don't believe in God, but in the same sense that I don't like Iago, or the Reverend Slope or any of the other villains of literature, the god of traditional Judaism and Christianity and Islam seems to me a terrible character. He's a god who will... who obsessed the degree to which people worship him and anxious to punish with the most awful torments those who don't worship him in the right way. Now I realize that many people don't believe in that any more who call themselves Muslims or Jews or Christians, but that is the traditional God and he's a terrible character. I don't like him.

...............................

"Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion."

Vis
04-30-2013, 06:14 PM
ZxDLkoK8vQQ

Buddha Bus
05-01-2013, 03:39 AM
gPOfurmrjxo

Buddha Bus
05-01-2013, 03:47 AM
Jim_HBj7Bdk

JonM229
05-01-2013, 08:46 AM
55h1FO8V_3w

9YLzlIsrU4o

Y9GOGY9Nh4M

SteelCityMom
05-02-2013, 11:38 PM
Just saw this on FB, and it made me think of this thread.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/935291_413436208764123_1806767358_n.jpg

SteelCityMom
05-02-2013, 11:51 PM
I just watched this on NetFlix streaming last night (I recommend it if you can watch is there or elsewhere...it's a PBS documentary), and I've never been so glad to be a homeschooler. Just insane. It's called The Revisionaries.

5nBpCNyq2ZM

Vis
05-03-2013, 02:37 AM
We use arabic numerals. Most of the stars that have names have arabic names. Why, because Bagdad was the center of science and mathematics when they were discovered. (So when Bush said "our God is the one who named the stars" he must have meant Allah) Then in about 1100 a Muslim writer wrote that science was the work of the devil and it all stopped. Fast forward to Texas rewriting textbooks to stop the teaching of evolution. The US is in danger of becoming a backward country, left behind by others who will teach science to their kids. We cannot innovate and compete in the world with a generation of people so ignorant as to think the earth is 6,000 years old or that man rode dinosaurs. The same is true of the a culture that denies climate change. To do so is to deny true science.

So, to recap, the earth is 4 1/2 billion years old. The universe is 13.77 billion years old. Man and apes have a common ancestor (as does all life). Man has changed the face of the planet and, yes, the planet will be fine. Its only the life on it's surface who will suffer. To deny any of this is ignorance. To ask how do they know is laziness because you can find out how they know quickly with that computer science brought you if you really had any intellectual curiosity on the subject.

Final thought - anyone who would reply by misusing the term "theory" needs to return to grade school.

SteelCityMom
05-03-2013, 11:26 AM
The social studies changes they made are even more disturbing (the final decisions were made in '10 and will be up for votes again in '20).

The woman who runs Texas Freedom Network explains that while they lost a couple of small battles (mostly in linguistics) in terms of science, the real defeats were in social studies. She said that for the most part, in terms of science, they were able to hold onto the majority (8) for most of the votes. They just got consistently trounced in the social studies area though. Did you see the part where they passed the change for references to slave trade? Yeah, that's not slave trade anymore...that's Atlantic Triangular Trade now. WTF???

Vis
05-03-2013, 12:21 PM
The social studies changes they made are even more disturbing (the final decisions were made in '10 and will be up for votes again in '20).

The woman who runs Texas Freedom Network explains that while they lost a couple of small battles (mostly in linguistics) in terms of science, the real defeats were in social studies. She said that for the most part, in terms of science, they were able to hold onto the majority (8) for most of the votes. They just got consistently trounced in the social studies area though. Did you see the part where they passed the change for references to slave trade? Yeah, that's not slave trade anymore...that's Atlantic Triangular Trade now. WTF???

That's when we imported all those triangles I guess

Vincent
05-04-2013, 09:37 AM
9V85OykSDT8

SteelCityMom
05-04-2013, 10:44 PM
OBA6qlHW8po

Vis
05-05-2013, 12:19 AM
6axdZAxyt2g

Vis
05-05-2013, 04:40 PM
If you haven't seen this, invest the time

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Vis
05-05-2013, 04:51 PM
quicker and funnier

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harrison'samonster
05-05-2013, 05:31 PM
http://static.tumblr.com/thaygdj/tqkm7zggk/diplodocus-front-small.jpg


Cartoons taught me that men did ride dinosaurs

Vis
05-13-2013, 02:24 PM
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-YQhp3IhEl7A/T3tGUNZlu4I/AAAAAAAAAhg/i0y_womX0hs/s1600/Heller+quotey+thing.jpg

Bayz101
05-13-2013, 02:32 PM
Make no mistake, this isn't God's earth anymore.

Vis
05-14-2013, 02:46 PM
During the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution, one morning’s executions began with three men: a rabbi, a Catholicpriest, and a rationalist skeptic.

The rabbi was marched up onto the platform first. There, facing the guillotine, he was asked if he had any last words. And the rabbi cried out, “I believe in the one and only true God, and He shall save me.” The executioner then positioned the rabbi below the blade, set the block above his neck, and pulled the cord to set the terrible instrument in motion. The heavy cleaver plunged downward, searing the air. But then, abruptly, it stopped with a crack just a few inches above the would-be victim’s neck. To which the rabbi said, “I told you so.”
“It’s a miracle!” gasped the crowd. And the executioner had to agree, letting the rabbi go.
Next in line was the priest. Asked for his final words, he declared, “I believe in Jesus Christ the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost who will rescue me in my hour of need.” The executioner then positioned this man beneath the blade. And he pulled the cord. Again the blade flew downward thump! creak! …stopping just short of its mark once more.
“Another miracle!” sighed the disappointed crowd. And the executioner for the second time had no choice but to let the condemned go free.
Now it was the skeptic’s turn. “What final words have you to say?” he was asked. But the skeptic didn’t hear. Staring intently at the ominous engine of death, he seemed lost. Not until the executioner poked him in the ribs and the question was asked again did he reply.
“Oh, I see your problem,” the skeptic said pointing. “You’ve got a blockage in the gear assembly, right there!”

Vis
05-22-2013, 06:12 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEClFXjx_fQ

ricardisimo
05-23-2013, 01:56 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEClFXjx_fQ
I still prefer the Old Atheists:

Bertrand Russell -
“And if there were a God, I think it very unlikely that He would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence”

“So far as I can remember there is not one word in the Gospels in praise of intelligence.”

“If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes. But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is an intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense. If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.”

“No man treats a motorcar as foolishly as he treats another human being. When the car will not go, he does not attribute its annoying behavior to sin; he does not say, 'You are a wicked motorcar, and I shall not give you any more petrol until you go.' He attempts to find out what is wrong and to set it right.”

“I say quite deliberately that the Christian religion, as organized in its churches, has been and still is the principal enemy of moral progress in the world. ”

Friedrich Nietzsche -
"Belief in the truth commences with the doubting of all those “truths” we once believed."


"The church is precisely that against which Jesus preached -- and against which he taught his disciples to fight."



"Distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful."

"Convictions are more dangerous enemies of truth than lies."

"God is a thought which makes crooked all that is straight."

"That everyone as an “immortal soul” has equal rank with everyone else, that in the totality of living beings the “salvation” of every single individual may claim eternal significance, that little prigs and three-quarter madmen may have the conceit that the laws of nature are constantly broken for their sakes—such an intensification of every kind of selfishness into the infinite, into the impertinent, cannot be branded with too much contempt. And yet Christianity owes its triumph to this miserable flattery of personal vanity: it was precisely all the failures, all the rebellious-minded, all the less favored, the whole scum and refuse of humanity who were thus won over to it. The “salvation of the soul"—in plain language: “the world revolves around me.”

Mark Twain -
"The gods offer no rewards for intellect. There was never one yet that showed any interest in it..."

Protagoras -
"Man is the measure of all things, of things that are that they are, of things that are not that they are not."

Aristophanes -
"Open your mouth and shut your eyes, and see what Zeus shall send you."

JonM229
07-24-2013, 10:05 AM
Why religion causes brain damage:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9FXT5KV6XI

MACH1
07-24-2013, 10:52 AM
And you thought religion causes brain damage. :toofunny:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43WJ4AlOI2Y

Vis
07-24-2013, 11:39 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PDZTveY4uQ

SteelerEmpire
07-24-2013, 12:06 PM
Most religion are mixed with a lot of good, philosophical tactics to live life by; and then a whole bunch of BS is thrown in there with it to "help" make the BS more believable (the good ol' mixing a lie with the truth tactic... taught in many business mgmt classes). We've seen or heard of the dark side of just about every religion in the last few decades, so I would not fault anyone who stood as an atheist but to even applaud their decision to do so.
If you separate the BS ideas of religion (very EASILY spotted), and use certain tenants of it instead as a "philosophy" of what to do in certain situations in life, then that's about the only true benefit you can get out of it that's actually 'identifiable'.

Represents every thing GOOD about religion:

http://jamesmccarty.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/gandhikinglogo2.jpg


Represents everything BAD about religion:

http://coffeeforclosers.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/westborobaptistchurch.png

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4997062376950692&pid=1.7

Vis
07-24-2013, 12:54 PM
Most religion are mixed with a lot of good, philosophical tactics to live life by; and then a whole bunch of BS is thrown in there with it to "help" make the BS more believable (the good ol' mixing a lie with the truth tactic... taught in many business mgmt classes). We've seen or heard of the dark side of just about every religion in the last few decades, so I would not fault anyone who stood as an atheist but to even applaud their decision to do so.
If you separate the BS ideas of religion (very EASILY spotted), and use certain tenants of it instead as a "philosophy" of what to do in certain situations in life, then that's about the only true benefit you can get out of it that's actually 'identifiable'.

Represents every thing GOOD about religion:

http://jamesmccarty.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/gandhikinglogo2.jpg


Represents everything BAD about religion:

http://coffeeforclosers.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/westborobaptistchurch.png

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4997062376950692&pid=1.7

Jainism at a glance

Jain temple in Calcutta, India
Jainism is an ancient religion from India that teaches that the way to liberation and bliss is to live lives of harmlessness and renunciation.

The essence of Jainism is concern for the welfare of every being in the universe and for the health of the universe itself.

Jains believe that animals and plants, as well as human beings, contain living souls. Each of these souls is considered of equal value and should be treated with respect and compassion.
Jains are strict vegetarians and live in a way that minimises their use of the world's resources.
Jains believe in reincarnation and seek to attain ultimate liberation - which means escaping the continuous cycle of birth, death and rebirth so that the immortal soul lives for ever in a state of bliss.
Liberation is achieved by eliminating all karma from the soul.
Jainism is a religion of self-help.
There are no gods or spiritual beings that will help human beings.
The three guiding principles of Jainism, the 'three jewels', are right belief, right knowledge and right conduct.
The supreme principle of Jain living is non violence (ahimsa).
This is one of the 5 mahavratas (the 5 great vows). The other mahavratas are non-attachment to possessions, not lying, not stealing, and sexual restraint (with celibacy as the ideal).
Mahavira is regarded as the man who gave Jainism its present-day form.
The texts containing the teachings of Mahavira are called the Agamas.
Jains are divided into two major sects; the Digambara (meaning "sky clad") sect and the Svetambara (meaning "white clad") sect.
Jainism has no priests. Its professional religious people are monks and nuns, who lead strict and ascetic lives.

Fire Haley
07-24-2013, 12:59 PM
this thread is hilarious...


(while they all prostrate themselves and worship at the alter of their new messiah)

http://obamanationofdesolation.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/obama_savior_cult.jpeg?w=450&h=245

JonM229
07-24-2013, 12:59 PM
The other mahavratas are non-attachment to possessions, not lying, not stealing, and sexual restraint (with celibacy as the ideal).


Thanks, but no thanks.

SteelerEmpire
07-24-2013, 04:14 PM
Jainism at a glance

Jain temple in Calcutta, India
Jainism is an ancient religion from India that teaches that the way to liberation and bliss is to live lives of harmlessness and renunciation.

The essence of Jainism is concern for the welfare of every being in the universe and for the health of the universe itself.

Jains believe that animals and plants, as well as human beings, contain living souls. Each of these souls is considered of equal value and should be treated with respect and compassion.
Jains are strict vegetarians and live in a way that minimises their use of the world's resources.
Jains believe in reincarnation and seek to attain ultimate liberation - which means escaping the continuous cycle of birth, death and rebirth so that the immortal soul lives for ever in a state of bliss.
Liberation is achieved by eliminating all karma from the soul.
Jainism is a religion of self-help.
There are no gods or spiritual beings that will help human beings.
The three guiding principles of Jainism, the 'three jewels', are right belief, right knowledge and right conduct.
The supreme principle of Jain living is non violence (ahimsa).
This is one of the 5 mahavratas (the 5 great vows). The other mahavratas are non-attachment to possessions, not lying, not stealing, and sexual restraint (with celibacy as the ideal).
Mahavira is regarded as the man who gave Jainism its present-day form.
The texts containing the teachings of Mahavira are called the Agamas.
Jains are divided into two major sects; the Digambara (meaning "sky clad") sect and the Svetambara (meaning "white clad") sect.
Jainism has no priests. Its professional religious people are monks and nuns, who lead strict and ascetic lives.

Just off of first glance, kind of reminds me of some of the ideas of the Buddha as well. Are these philosophies related ?

Vis
07-24-2013, 05:29 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSdGr4K4qLg

vasteeler
07-24-2013, 05:36 PM
Just off of first glance, kind of reminds me of some of the ideas of the Buddha as well. Are these philosophies related ?



what?!?!?!....oh, wait wrong buddha

ricardisimo
07-24-2013, 11:50 PM
Thanks, but no thanks.
I know, right? Leave it to religion to screw up a good thing.

Buddha Bus
07-25-2013, 03:43 AM
what?!?!?!....oh, wait wrong buddha

My thoughts are less philosophies and more drunken ramblings. :alcoholic

Vis
07-25-2013, 06:57 AM
My thoughts are less philosophies and more drunken ramblings. :alcoholic

We are shaped by our beer; we become what we drink. When the vodka is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves.
Buddha

Vis
08-19-2013, 03:33 PM
https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/994318_10151867260091081_969220267_n.jpg

JonM229
08-28-2013, 10:11 AM
Measles Outbreak at Texas Faith-Healing Megachurch (http://www.nbcnews.com/health/measles-outbreak-tied-texas-megachurch-sickens-21-8C11009315)

An outbreak of measles tied to a Texas megachurch where ministers have questioned vaccination has sickened at least 21 people, including a 4-month-old infant -- and it’s expected to grow, state and federal health officials said.

“There’s likely a lot more susceptible people,” said Dr. Jane Seward, the deputy director for the viral diseases division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Sixteen people -- nine children and seven adults -- ranging in age from 4 months to 44 years had come down with the highly contagious virus in Tarrant County, Texas, as of Monday. Another five cases are part of the outbreak in nearby Denton County.

All of the cases are linked to the Eagle Mountain International Church in Newark, Texas, where a visitor who’d traveled to Indonesia became infected with measles – and then returned to the U.S., spreading it to the largely unvaccinated church community, said Russell Jones, the Texas state epidemiologist.

“We have a pocket of people that weren’t immunized,” said Jones, noting that vaccination rates typically hover above the 98 percent range in his county.

Infections spread to the congregation, the staff and a day care center at Eagle Mountain International.

The ill people were all linked to the church that is a division of Kenneth Copeland Ministries. That group advocates faith-healing and advises people to “first seek the Wisdom of God” and then appropriate medical attention in matters of health, according to an online statement.

Terri Pearsons, a senior pastor of Eagle Mountain International Church and Copeland’s daughter, previously said she had concerns about possible ties between early childhood vaccines and autism, a position that has been refuted by health officials.

In the wake of the measles outbreak, however, Pearsons has urged followers to get vaccinated and the church has held several vaccination clinics, according to its website. Health officials said the church administration has been very cooperative in the outbreak investigation. Pearsons did not return an email from NBC News seeking comment.

“We continue to follow up on pending and confirmed cases to help in any way we can to keep the outbreak contained,” a church statement said. “We ask that others join us in prayers over this outbreak.”

Health authorities notified the church of the first cases on Aug. 14; Texas state health officials issued a warning about the outbreak on Aug. 16. In the meantime, hundreds -- perhaps more than 1,000 -- contacts could have been affected by potentially infected people, Seward said.

“In this community, these cases so far are all in people who refused vaccination for themselves and their children,” she added.

Of the 16 cases in Tarrant County, 11 did not have any measles vaccination. The others may have had at least one measles vaccination, but they couldn’t produce documentation, county officials said.

The outbreak raises to 159 the total number of confirmed measles cases in the U.S. this year. The disease that once killed 500 people a year in the U.S. and hospitalized 48,000 had been considered virtually eradicated after a vaccine introduced in 1963. Cases now show up typically when an unvaccinated person contracts the disease abroad and spreads it upon return to the U.S.

Five previous cases in Texas this year were far higher than typical years, but don’t appear to be related to the current outbreak, state officials said.

Measles is so contagious that 90 percent of people who are not immune to the disease or vaccinated against it will get sick, health officials warned. It is a respiratory disease spread by sneezing or coughing. The virus can live in the air or on infected surfaces for up to two hours. Symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose and sore throat, plus a characteristic red rash that starts on the face or hairline and spreads to the rest of the body. It can take eight days to two weeks after exposure before an infected person develops symptoms.

Health officials recommend that children receive a Measles/Mumps/Rubella -- MMR -- vaccine at age 12 months and again at 4 to 6 years. Unless adults have previously had measles or are immunized, health officials say they should be vaccinated.

“We just want people to be aware and well-informed about the risks of the disease, especially when they travel abroad,” Seward said.

See what happens when you believe that Jenny McCarthy is God?

Vis
08-28-2013, 10:29 AM
God's wrath for Johnny Football signing scandal.

JonM229
10-10-2013, 01:25 PM
Story of Jesus Christ was 'fabricated to pacify the poor', claims controversial Biblical scholar (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/story-of-jesus-christ-was-fabricated-to-pacify-the-poor-claims-controversial-biblical-scholar-8870879.html)



A controversial American biblical scholar is set to make his first appearance in London next week to present a discovery that he claims proves the story of Jesus Christ was invented as a system of mind control to enslave the poor.

Joseph Atwill, who is the author of a book entitled 'Caesar's Messiah: The Roman Conspiracy to Invent Jesus', asserts that Christianity did not begin as a religion, but was actually a sophisticated government propaganda exercise used to pacify the subjects of the Roman Empire.

At the 'Covert Messiah' conference, to be held at the Conway Hall in Holborn a week on Saturday, Mr Atwill will present his theory that the New Testament was written by first-century Roman aristocrats and that they entirely fabricated the story of Jesus Christ.

Outlining his ideas in a blog posting on his website Mr Atwill writes: "Christianity may be considered a religion, but it was actually developed and used as a system of mind control to produce slaves that believed God decreed their slavery."

Mr Atwill says that acts of insurrection by Jewish sects, who were awaiting the arrival of a so-called 'warrior Messiah' in Palestine, were a perpetual problem for the Roman Empire and that after the Empire had exhausted all traditional means of dealing with the problem they resorted to psychological warfare.

"They surmised that the way to stop the spread of zealous Jewish missionary activity was to create a competing belief system," Atwill told PRWeb.com

"That's when the 'peaceful' Messiah story was invented.

"Instead of inspiring warfare, this Messiah urged turn-the-other-cheek pacifism and encouraged Jews to 'give onto Caesar' and pay their taxes to Rome."

Mr Atwill continues: "Although Christianity can be a comfort to some, it can also be very damaging and repressive, an insidious form of mind control that has led to blind acceptance of serfdom, poverty, and war throughout history.

To this day, especially in the United States, it is used to create support for war in the Middle East."

Elsewhere, Mr Atwill also writes: “In fact he [Jesus] may be the only fictional character in literature whose entire life story can be traced to other sources. Once those sources are all laid bare, there’s simply nothing left.”

Atwill says he made his discovery when while studying the New Testament alongside the 'War of the Jews' by Josephus - the only surviving first-person historical account of first-century Judea.

Mr Atwill claims that he began to notice a sequence of parallels between the two texts.

"What seems to have eluded many scholars is that the sequence of events and locations of Jesus ministry are more or less the same as the sequence of events and locations of the military campaign of [Emperor] Titus Flavius as described by Josephus," Atwill claims.

"This is clear evidence of a deliberately constructed pattern", he continues.

"The biography of Jesus is actually constructed, tip to stern, on prior stories, but especially on the biography of a Roman Caesar."

Mr Atwill's theory is simply one of a number of what are known as Bible conspiracy theories.

These theories commonly include the suggestion that secret societies, mystery schools and other religions used the fictional story of Christ to unify the Roman Empire under one state religion.

PeckerWood
10-10-2013, 06:24 PM
During the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution, one morning’s executions began with three men: a rabbi, a Catholicpriest, and a rationalist skeptic.

The rabbi was marched up onto the platform first. There, facing the guillotine, he was asked if he had any last words. And the rabbi cried out, “I believe in the one and only true God, and He shall save me.” The executioner then positioned the rabbi below the blade, set the block above his neck, and pulled the cord to set the terrible instrument in motion. The heavy cleaver plunged downward, searing the air. But then, abruptly, it stopped with a crack just a few inches above the would-be victim’s neck. To which the rabbi said, “I told you so.”
“It’s a miracle!” gasped the crowd. And the executioner had to agree, letting the rabbi go.
Next in line was the priest. Asked for his final words, he declared, “I believe in Jesus Christ the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost who will rescue me in my hour of need.” The executioner then positioned this man beneath the blade. And he pulled the cord. Again the blade flew downward thump! creak! …stopping just short of its mark once more.
“Another miracle!” sighed the disappointed crowd. And the executioner for the second time had no choice but to let the condemned go free.
Now it was the skeptic’s turn. “What final words have you to say?” he was asked. But the skeptic didn’t hear. Staring intently at the ominous engine of death, he seemed lost. Not until the executioner poked him in the ribs and the question was asked again did he reply.
“Oh, I see your problem,” the skeptic said pointing. “You’ve got a blockage in the gear assembly, right there!”

I heard the joke punch line, the certain ethnic man said "grease those grooves and the blade will come down faster and all the way through the neck hole" :chuckle:

JonM229
02-17-2014, 08:24 AM
Reality Show Snake-Handling Preacher Dies Of Snakebite (http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/16/us/snake-salvation-pastor-bite/)

A Kentucky pastor who starred in a reality show about snake-handling in church has died -- of a snakebite.

Jamie Coots died Saturday evening after refusing to be treated, Middleborough police said.

On "Snake Salvation," the ardent Pentecostal believer said that he believed that a passage in the Bible suggests poisonous snakebites will not harm believers as long as they are anointed by God. The practice is illegal in most states, but still goes on, primarily in the rural South.

Coots was a third-generation "serpent handler" and aspired to one day pass the practice and his church, Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name, on to his adult son, Little Cody.

The National Geographic show featured Coots and cast handling all kinds of poisonous snakes -- copperheads, rattlers, cottonmouths. The channel's website shows a picture of Coots, goateed, wearing a fedora. "Even after losing half of his finger to a snake bite and seeing others die from bites during services," Coots "still believes he must take up serpents and follow the Holiness faith," the website says.

On Sunday, National Geographic Channels spokeswoman Stephanie Montgomery sent CNN this statement: "In following Pastor Coots for our series Snake Salvation, we were constantly struck by his devout religious convictions despite the health and legal peril he often faced.

"Those risks were always worth it to him and his congregants as a means to demonstrate their unwavering faith. We were honored to be allowed such unique access to Pastor Jamie and his congregation during the course of our show, and give context to his method of worship. Our thoughts are with his family at this difficult time."

In February 2013, Coots was given one year of probation for crossing into Tennessee with venomous snakes. He was previously arrested in 2008 for keeping 74 snakes in his home, according to National Geographic. Tennessee banned snake handling in 1947 after five people were bitten in churches over two years' time, the channel says on the show site.

On one episode, Coots, who collected snakes, is shown trying to wrest a Western diamondback out of its nook under a rock deep in East Texas. He's wearing a cowboy hat and a T-shirt that says "The answer to Y2K - JESUS."

The pastor is helped by his son and a couple of church members.

"He'll give up, just sooner or later," one of the members says. "Just be careful. Ease him out."

The group bags two snakes, which a disappointed Coots says hardly justifies the trip to Texas.

"Catching two snakes the first day, 'course we'd hoped for more," Coots says in the video. "We knew that the next day we was gonna have to try to hunt harder and hope for more snakes."

While I certainly feel for this guy's family, I would like to thank all snake-handling preachers for providing proof of natural selection.

Vis
02-17-2014, 08:32 AM
He refused medical treatment at least twice.

JonM229
02-17-2014, 08:53 AM
My wife's mother and grandmother were involved in Pentecostal churches when she was younger. While she never witnessed any snake handling, there was a lot of speaking in tongues and laying of hands. She said there were several instances where she would have to pretend to speak in tongues just to please everyone else, while being fully conscious of the fact that everyone else is most likely faking it as well.

JonM229
02-17-2014, 12:00 PM
He refused medical treatment at least twice.

I wonder how believers react when snake-handlers die from snakebites. Do they mourn the loss, or is it no big deal since they must not have been "chosen"?

JonM229
02-18-2014, 02:12 PM
http://i.imgur.com/bYXCUtO.jpg

Vis
02-18-2014, 02:29 PM
http://i.imgur.com/bYXCUtO.jpg

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/81752461/

Oh I know the darkness

FanSince72
02-18-2014, 03:06 PM
Wait...I thought God's greatest gift to humanity was crude oil.

Hmmm...

Now I'm all fucked up. :doh:


I'm gonna go mast..., er... think about it for a while.