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View Full Version : 911 call -- 'I've been kidnapped!' -- cops find 3 women missing for years


Vis
05-07-2013, 04:26 AM
Amanda Berry was last seen after finishing her shift at a Burger King in Cleveland in 2003. It was the eve of her 17th birthday.

Georgina "Gina" DeJesus disappeared nearly a year later, in April 2004. She was 14.

Michele Knight vanished in 2002, at age 19, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer newspaper.

All three were found alive in a home in a Cleveland neighborhood Monday night, police announced in a development hailed as a miracle by their families.

"Help me, I am Amanda Berry," Berry told police in a frantic 911 call from a neighbor's house. "I've been kidnapped, and I've been missing for 10 years. And I'm here, I'm free now."

Police swiftly moved in on the house where the three of them said they had been and arrested a 52-year-old man, identified as a former school bus driver. Two others, identified as his brothers, ages 50 and 54, also have been arrested, Deputy Police Chief Ed Tomba told reporters late Monday. Police believe only the middle brother lived at the home, he said.

The men are being held in the city jail awaiting charges. An FBI team is collecting evidence in the house.

"This is a great, great outcome that we have them still with us," Tomba said. "It's just truly, truly amazing and it's a blessing to the community and to the members of the police department and their families that they're alive. I can't tell you how happy we are."

Those feelings were echoed at Cleveland's Metro Health Medical Center where the three women and a fourth person were being treated.

"This isn't the ending we usually hear to these stories, so we're very happy," said Dr. Gerald Maloney, an emergency room physician there. We're very happy for them."

The three women were in fair condition. Maloney would not identify the fourth person being seen at the hospital, but witnesses said Berry, who escaped from the house with the help of a neighbor, had a young child with her.

The escape

Neighbor Charles Ramsey was sitting down to a fast food meal when he heard screaming.

"I see this girl going nuts trying to get out of a house," he told CNN affiliate WEWS. "I go on the porch and she says, 'help me get out. I've been in here a long time.'"

Figuring it was a domestic dispute, Ramsey kicked in the bottom of the door and the woman came out with a little girl and said, "Call 911, My name is Amanda Berry," according to Ramsey, who admitted he didn't recognize the name or know she was missing.

Free from the house where they had been held captive, Berry pleaded for a phone.

"They were crazy, screaming, 'Help, call police, please help.' ... They were desperate, crying, running," said Angela Garcia, whose aunt provided the phone for them to call police.

Ramsey also called 911, less than a minute later.

"She's like, 'This (expletive) kidnapped me and my daughter,'" he told 911.

DeJesus's mother, Nancy, met with her at the hospital, cousin Sylvia Colon, told CNN's "Piers Morgan Tonight." She had never given up hope of finding her daughter alive.

"She has always said that she just could feel it, a link a mom can feel, but she always believed Gina was alive and well," Colon said. "She always believed that. I just want to say what a phenomenal Mother's Day gift she gets this Mother's Day."

Suspect's identity

Brian Cummins, a councilman who represents the area where the women were found, identified the suspect in whose home the women were found as Ariel Castro. His uncle, Julio Castro, told CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360" that his family had grown up in the same west Cleveland neighborhood and knew the DeJesus family.

Castro used to work as a bus driver for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, according to district spokeswoman Roseann Canfora. She did not have specifics Monday night on how long he was employed, when he left or whether he was fired or left voluntarily.

Ramsey told reporters the suspect wasn't known for anything exciting -- "until today."

"We see this dude every day. I've been here a year. I barbecued with this dude. We eat ribs and listen to salsa music," Ramsey said.

And Garcia said neighbors "never saw nothing suspicious."

"We never saw the girls there, and we were always outside," she said. "We only saw the guy."

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson said there were "many unanswered questions regarding this case, and the investigation will be ongoing." But he added, "I am thankful that these three young ladies are found and alive."

Vis
05-07-2013, 04:44 AM
2XRzsNbskTA

Buddha Bus
05-07-2013, 06:14 AM
Wow. Nuts.

What the hell is wrong with people nowadays? :headshake:

Vis
05-07-2013, 12:40 PM
Cleveland (CNN) -- Three long-missing women -- Amanda Berry, Georgina "Gina" DeJesus and Michelle Knight -- and a child belonging to one of them were found alive Monday in a Cleveland home, police said. The women are believed to have been abducted as teenagers years ago -- in 2002, 2003 and 2004 -- and held captive at the home, according to police.
Three suspects, all brothers, including the home's owner, Ariel Castro, 52, were arrested and are awaiting charges, police said. Here are the most recent developments in the case:
New developments:
-- The names and ages of Ariel Castro's arrested brothers are Pedro Castro, 54, and Oneil Castro, 50, Cleveland police said Tuesday.
-- A child in the house is believed to be Berry's, police in Cleveland say.
-- Officials have no indication that anybody living near the Cleveland home ever called authorities about anything suspicious there, city Public Safety Director Martin Flask said Tuesday. Flask said that assessment is based on an initial review of city databases; officials will continue to examine the databases, he said.
Neighbor kicked in door to rescue women Neighbor: Strange event at Castro's home Suspects' uncle: I never want to see them
-- Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson said Tuesday that investigators are working to answer three questions: Why and how the women were taken, and how they remained undetected.
-- Since two of the women disappeared, police were called to the home once -- in January 2004 -- Flask said. Investigators were there at the request of Children and Family Services to investigate a complaint that Castro left a child on a school bus while he was working as a school bus driver, Flask said. Investigators knocked on the home's door but were "unsuccessful in making contact." The matter was later dropped when investigators determined that Castro had no criminal intent in the bus incident, Flask said.
-- Investigators are interested in looking at other properties connected to the suspects, Cleveland Deputy Police Chief Ed Tomba said Tuesday.
-- Knight, of Cleveland, had been last seen on August 22, 2002, and was reported missing by a family member the next day, Flask said. She was 20 at the time, Flask said.
-- When asked whether Castro had gained his alleged captives' trust through his job as a school bus driver, and whether he had driven them when they were students, Tomba said investigators have no evidence of that. "That's up to the girls to tell us," he said Tuesday. "We still don't know; that is one of the great unknowns right now. We anticipate getting that information from the ladies, not the suspects."
-- Jaycee Dugard, who was abducted as a child and freed in 2009 after 18 years of captivity behind the home of a California couple, made the following statement regarding the discovery of the Cleveland women: "These individuals need the opportunity to heal and connect back into the world. This isn't who they are. It is only what happened to them. The human spirit is incredibly resilient. More than ever this reaffirms we should never give up hope."
-- The uncle of the three suspects in custody said family members are "surprised" about the developments. "Shame on you," Julio Castro told CNN's Martin Savidge, when asked what he would say to his nephews.
Previously reported developments:
-- The three women and the child were rescued Monday after a neighbor, Charles Ramsey, heard screaming from the home, Ramsey said.
-- Ramsey kicked in the bottom of a door, and a woman came out with a girl and said, "Call 911, my name is Amanda Berry," according to Ramsey.
-- Ramsey and Berry called 911, authorities said. "Help me, I am Amanda Berry," she said in the 911 call. "I've been kidnapped, and I've been missing for 10 years. And I'm here, I'm free now."
-- In addition to Berry, police found DeJesus and Knight at the home; all three said they were held captive there, according to authorities.
-- Police later arrested Ariel Castro, who's identified as a former school bus driver, and his two brothers. Police believe Ariel Castro was the only one of the brothers who lived at the home, Tomba told reporters late Monday.
-- Berry was last seen after finishing her shift at a Burger King in Cleveland in 2003. It was the eve of her 17th birthday.
-- DeJesus disappeared nearly a year later, in April 2004. She was 14.

Lady Steel
05-09-2013, 12:57 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZcRU0Op5P4

Vis
05-09-2013, 03:53 PM
Ohio kidnap suspect made 'deliberate and depraved decisions,' prosecutor says


Cleveland (CNN) -- Ariel Castro maintained his home as a prison for three young women, holding them in seclusion and sexually assaulting them for his own pleasure, a Cuyahoga County, Ohio, prosecutor told a judge Thursday.

Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Brian Murphy told the judge "the charges against Mr. Castro are based on premeditated, deliberate and depraved decisions to snatch three young ladies from Cleveland's Westside streets to be used in whatever self-gratifying, self-serving way he saw fit."

"Today, the situation has turned, your honor," Murphy said. "Mr. Castro stands before you as a captive. ... The women are free to resume their lives that were interrupted."

Cleveland Municipal Court Judge Lauren Moore ordered Castro held on $8 million bond -- $2 million for each of the four victims -- the three women and the child born to one of them during her captivity. He faces four counts of kidnapping and three of rape.

Under state law, any restraint on "the liberty of the other person" can be considered kidnapping, which would allow prosecutors to bring the charge in the case of Berry's child.

Castro -- who is on unemployment benefits, according to his attorney -- would have to put up $800,000 in cash plus some sort of property of comparable value to the bonding company as collateral, said Charles Eddie Miller, president of the Ohio Bail Agents Association. Ohio allows bail on any charge but capital murder.

Castro, handcuffed and wearing a blue jail jumpsuit, looked down through the entire hearing. He did not speak.

His brothers, who appeared briefly before him on unrelated misdemeanor charges, are under the protection of police in an undisclosed location, a Cleveland justice system source told CNN's Martin Savidge.

Authorities initially arrested Pedro and Onil Castro in connection with the case, but later concluded they were not aware of what was going on inside the house.

Who are Berry, DeJesus and Knight?

Ariel Castro is accused of kidnapping the women -- Amanda Berry, Michelle Knight and Georgina "Gina" DeJesus -- from the same Cleveland neighborhood between 2002 and 2004.

They were freed Monday after Berry staged a daring escape while Castro was away from the house. She drew the attention of neighbors who helped her break through a door and summon police.

On Thursday, a high-ranking law enforcement source told CNN that investigators had found a suicide note believed to have been written by Castro in 2004. The note references abuse by a relative in the past, the source said.

Public Defender Kathleen DeMetz said it was her understanding that Castro was on suicide watch at the Cleveland city jail before being transferred to the Cuyahoga County detention center. It was unclear if he was still on suicide watch.

According to an initial incident report obtained by CNN, Knight said she became pregnant at least five times during her captivity in Castro's 1,400-square-foot home.

In conversations with police immediately after she was freed, she said that when Castro learned she was pregnant, he would "make her abort the baby," according to the document.

Knight "stated that he starved her for at least 2 weeks, then he repeatedly punched her in the stomach until she miscarried," the initial police report states.

But Castro ordered Knight to deliver Amanda Berry's child when she became pregnant, according to a police source familiar with the investigation.

The baby was delivered in a plastic tub or pool in order to contain the afterbirth and amniotic fluid, the source said.

But soon after Berry's baby was born, panic ensued. The child stopped breathing, and everyone started screaming, the source said, citing accounts by the young women.

Knight said Castro threatened to kill her if the baby did not survive, the initial police report states.

"What's most incredible here is that this girl who knows nothing about childbirth was able to deliver a baby that is now a healthy 6-year-old," the source said.

A decade-long nightmare

Berry, Knight and DeJesus went outside Castro's home only twice -- and just "briefly" at that, Cleveland Public Safety Director Martin Flask said.

According to the initial incident report, the women said that Castro first chained them in the basement, but later freed them from the chains and allowed them to live upstairs on the second floor.

Most of the time the three would be in different rooms, though they interacted occasionally and came to "rely on each other for survival," said a law enforcement source with direct knowledge of the investigation.

One thing they could count on was that their alleged captor would never let them out.

Castro would often test the young women by pretending to leave, the law enforcement source said. Then he'd suddenly return; if there were indications any of the women had moved, they'd be disciplined.

Years went by.

In that time, the women saw their parents on television at vigils held for them, according to the law enforcement source. They got emotional, knowing their loved ones were looking for them.

And in time, Knight and DeJesus "succumbed" to "their reality," the law enforcement source said.

But "something must have clicked" for Berry on Monday evening, and the 27-year-old staged a daring escape, Cleveland Deputy Police Chief Ed Tomba said.

With the help of Castro's neighbors Charles Ramsey and Angel Cordero, Berry freed herself, her 6-year-old daughter and the two other women.

Neighbor who helped Berry an instant Internet star

Berry and DeJesus are back with their families. Knight remained hospitalized in good condition Thursday, said MetroHealth Medical Center spokeswoman Tina Shaerban-Arundel. CNN's previous report that she had been released was premature.

"I knew my daughter was out there alive," said Felix DeJesus, Gina's father, moments after she arrived at a family home Wednesday. "I knew she needed me, and I never gave up."

Amanda Berry's grandmother, Fern Gentry, said on CNN's "Starting Point" Thursday that hearing that Berry was alive 10 years after her disappearance was the "most important thing that ever happened in my life."

Gentry, who spoke to Berry by phone from her Tennessee home Tuesday, said she was thankful for the people who helped in her rescue.

"If she hadn't got out, I don't think she would have lived very much longer," Gentry said.

Survival the key difference from 'House of Horrors' case

How the ordeal started

Knight was 21 on August 22, 2002, when Castro lured her into his vehicle along Cleveland's Lorain Avenue, according to charging documents. Castro took her back to his home on Seymour Avenue, about three miles away, and didn't let her go.

Knight was sexually assaulted multiple times, the documents state. Soon, others joined her.

Berry experienced a similar nightmare on April 21, 2003 -- the eve of her 17th birthday. She was walking home from her job at Burger King that night when Castro told her his son also worked at Burger King and offered her a ride home, the initial police report states.

Almost exactly a year later, they were joined by DeJesus, then 14 years old.

They remained in that hell until Monday evening, when Berry got to a door and screamed for help. Hearing her cries, Ramsey and Cordero kicked in the door to help her escape.

According to Cordero, Berry's 6-year-old daughter ran out of the house, too, wearing only a diaper and a sullied shirt. Police are conducting a DNA test to determine the child's paternity.

"Help me, I am Amanda Berry," the victim begged a 911 operator from Ramsey's house. "I've been kidnapped, and I've been missing for 10 years. And I'm here, I'm free now."

Knight and DeJesus didn't run out of the house with Berry, even though they could have, said the law enforcement source with direct knowledge of the case. The source described the Knight and DeJesus as brainwashed and fearful.

He 'kept everybody at a distance'

So how did this all happen in an urban neighborhood? Did Castro -- a former school bus driver described by a band mate as an upbeat and outgoing musician -- keep such a secret not only from his neighbors, but also his family, as police allege?

Timeline: From missing to liberated

Soon after the three women were found, Castro and two brothers who were with him were taken into custody.

Over the next two days, authorities "found no facts to link" Onil and Pedro Castro to the kidnappings, though both brothers appeared in Cleveland Municipal Court on Thursday for outstanding warrants on unrelated misdemeanor cases.

"Ariel kept everybody at a distance," said Tomba, the deputy police chief.

Castro has been talking to investigators since Tuesday, as have the three young women, whom police say he kidnapped and raped.

Law enforcement personnel have been sifting through Castro's Seymour Avenue home -- which Tomba said was in "disarray" -- and removed more than 200 items that they hope will let them piece together what happened.

The Ohio attorney general's office said Thursday that the state Bureau of Criminal Investigation's crime lab will help test some of the evidence.

Additionally, FBI agents searched a boarded-up home two doors down after obtaining information over the past few days tying that building to the case, the deputy police chief said.

Did anyone drop the ball?

As they investigate, authorities are facing scrutiny over whether the nightmare could have been prevented or stopped much earlier.

Some neighbors said they had contacted police about suspicious activity on Castro's property, such as reports of screaming and naked women in his backyard. But authorities say they never got any such calls.

In fact, police say they had been to Castro's house only twice -- once after he called about a fight on his street, and once to investigate an incident in which he was accused of leaving a child alone on a bus. No one answered at the home in the latter case, and investigators later interviewed him elsewhere, police said.

According to court documents from 2005, Castro's former common-law wife accused him of repeatedly abusing her, including breaking her nose twice, breaking two ribs, dislocating her shoulder twice and knocking out a tooth. A judge granted a protection order but lifted it three months later.

Tomba said he doesn't think authorities dropped the ball.

"I'm just very, very confident (that) law enforcement officers ... checked every single lead, and if there was one bit of evidence, (they would have) followed it up very, very aggressively," he said.

"In hindsight, we may find out that maybe we did, but that's going to be in hindsight."

Lady Steel
05-09-2013, 10:43 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xjkce4b6l40


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzHyKtUgsvs

tony hipchest
05-10-2013, 02:17 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZcRU0Op5P4this masterpeice of genius has been my earworm lately. ive listened to it dozens of times every day since it came out, and sing it when its not playing.

is it topping the charts or itunes downloads yet?

Lady Steel
05-11-2013, 11:03 PM
If it's not, it should be. :laughing: Charles Ramsey is hilarious. I couldn't stop laughing. And good for him. He did good.

Vis
05-15-2013, 10:17 AM
Cleveland kidnap accused Castro to plead innocent - lawyers

The US man accused of imprisoning three women for a decade in his house in Ohio will plead not guilty to all charges, his lawyers say.
Ariel Castro, aged 52, is charged with four counts of kidnapping and three counts of rape.

The women were abducted at different times and held in Mr Castro's house in Cleveland. One of them escaped earlier this month and raised the alarm.

"He's not a monster and he shouldn't be demonised," said lawyer Jaye Schlachet.

Speaking to the AFP news agency, he added that details of Mr Castro's innocence "will be disclosed as the case progresses".

Craig Weintraub, another defence lawyer, told WKYC-TV that his client "loves dearly'' the child he fathered with 27-year-old Amanda Berry - one of the three alleged kidnap victims.

The other women freed from Mr Castro's house were Gina DeJesus, 23, and Michelle Knight, 32.
Prosecutors in Ohio have said they also plan to seek aggravated murder charges that could carry the death penalty.

The charges relate to alleged forced miscarriages suffered by one victim.

'Sexual predator'

Mr Castro made his first court appearance in Cleveland on 9 May without entering a plea.

County prosecutor Brian Murphy told that hearing: "The charges against Mr Castro are based on premeditated, deliberate, depraved decisions to snatch three young ladies from Cleveland West Side streets to be used in whatever self-gratifying, self-serving way he saw fit."

He is charged with four counts of kidnapping, covering the three initial abduction victims and Jocelyn, Ms Berry's six-year-old daughter, who was apparently conceived and born in captivity.

The former school bus driver also faces three counts of rape, one against each woman.

Bail was set at $8m (£5.1m), meaning in effect that he has remained in custody ever since. He is currently on suicide watch and is being kept in isolation.

According to CBS News, Mr Castro confessed to his crimes in a long, hand-written letter found in the house, which investigators believe may have been intended as a suicide note.

In the 2004-dated letter he said he had been raped as a child by his uncle and was also abused by his parents, a law enforcement source told the US network.

Mr Castro reportedly called himself a "sexual predator", but he also asked to donate all his money to his victims after his death.
His two brothers, Pedro and Onil, also appeared in court on unrelated charges. They had been arrested, but police found no evidence linking them to the crime.

Pedro Castro was fined $100 for public drinking, while two minor counts against Onil Castro were dropped.

Ms Berry, whose disappearance in 2003 the day before her 17th birthday was widely publicised in the local media, escaped from Mr Castro's house by kicking the door and screaming for help while her alleged captor was out. A neighbour helped her to escape.

The other women were freed soon afterwards. They were all abducted after accepting rides from Mr Castro, according to a police report leaked to the media.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-22543247

Vis
07-09-2013, 09:54 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/09/us/cleveland-rescued-women-video/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

'Thank you:' Cleveland kidnapping victims speak out for the first time

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oG0WePdZoxg

Vis
07-26-2013, 12:52 PM
Ariel Castro Avoids Death Penalty With Life-Sentence Plea Deal

Ariel Castro will avoid the death penalty. The man who kidnapped and repeatedly raped three women who he held captive in his Cleveland home for a decade accepted a plea deal this morning that will send him to prison for the rest of his life without the possibility of parole. The Chicago Tribune:

Castro, 53, clad in an orange prison jumpsuit, told Cuyahoga County Judge Michael Russo that he understood he would never emerge from prison under the agreement. "I do understand that," Castro responded. "I knew I was pretty much going to get the book thrown at me." Castro was charged with 977 counts, including kidnapping and rape, for the abduction and imprisonment of Gina DeJesus, 23, Michelle Knight, 32, and Amanda Berry, 27.
Castro will officially be sentenced to life plus an additional 1,000 years of prison time. Prosecutors had previously suggested they would seek the death penalty under the Ohio law that classifies a forced miscarriage as aggravated murder. In the end, however, the plea deal brings a quick ending to what could have been a lengthy trial that would have forced Castro's victims to relive their time under his control.

MACH1
09-04-2013, 01:13 AM
Ohio kidnapping suspect commits suicide

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio corrections officials say Ariel Castro who held three women captive in his home for nearly a decade has committed suicide at a state prison facility.

Spokeswoman JoEllen Smith says 53-year-old Castro was found hanging in his cell around 9:20 p.m. Tuesday at the Correctional Reception Center in Orient. Prison medical staff performed CPR before Castro was transported to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

The three women disappeared separately between 2002 and 2004, when they were 14, 16 and 20 years old. They escaped May 6, when one of the women broke part of a door and yelled to neighbors for help. Castro was arrested that evening.

Castro was sentenced Aug. 1 to life in prison plus 1,000 years on his guilty plea to 937 counts including kidnapping and rape.

http://www.koin.com/2013/09/03/ohio-kidnapping-suspect-commits-suicide/

ricardisimo
09-04-2013, 01:50 AM
That didn't take too long.

tony hipchest
09-04-2013, 01:53 AM
:hatsoff::thumbsup::tt03::applaudit::party:

MasterOfPuppets
09-04-2013, 02:08 AM
:applaudit::applaudit::applaudit::applaudit:....a beak for tax payers ...woohoo !!!!:celebrate

i've always said every cell should have a noose in them to give the scumbags a chance to finally do the right thing.

jacobo
09-04-2013, 03:04 AM
hope it hurt

Buddha Bus
09-04-2013, 04:44 AM
This is how Joe Flacco found out while working his day job.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJNCSuL-lEM

GodfatherofSoul
09-04-2013, 11:23 AM
As a court commentator pointed out this morning, Castro had 3 women imprisoned for 10 years, and he couldn't hack one MONTH locked up with a hell of a lot more freedom than they had.

Atlanta Dan
09-04-2013, 11:38 AM
Amazing how often child molesters and creeps like Castro manage to hang themselves while under "close surveillance" in prison

Glad the guards did not get in the way :thumbsup::drink::wave:

tony hipchest
09-04-2013, 11:49 AM
i read it was the 2nd hanging at the facility in the last month.

JonM229
09-04-2013, 11:52 AM
"They said you was hung!"

"And they was right."

steelax04
09-04-2013, 11:52 AM
In cases like this, these shitbags deserve to be tortured. However, they can't be tortured. So I say let them off themselves, rid the world of a leech, save the taxpayers some money, and maybe provide the victims some sort of closure that this piece of shit is no longer roaming the earth.

Atlanta Dan
09-04-2013, 12:57 PM
i read it was the 2nd hanging at the facility in the last month.

Wonder if anyone was disciplined (or rewarded)?

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRGqJiTkwgyWOBsrVdJxZms0mlhf_Ne0 wZXhPDNa6jydEKRwIll

harrison'samonster
09-04-2013, 01:04 PM
In cases like this, these shitbags deserve to be tortured. However, they can't be tortured. So I say let them off themselves, rid the world of a leech, save the taxpayers some money, and maybe provide the victims some sort of closure that this piece of shit is no longer roaming the earth.

I'd like nothing more than to agree with you, but loss of freedom is enough of a punishment.

MasterOfPuppets
09-04-2013, 05:17 PM
I'd like nothing more than to agree with you, but loss of freedom is enough of a punishment.
maybe 75 years ago perhaps. but not todays prison where guards have to worry about offending prisoners.

Vis
09-04-2013, 05:24 PM
maybe 75 years ago perhaps. but not todays prison where guards have to worry about offending prisoners.

Is that ever a whopper of a myth.

GodfatherofSoul
09-04-2013, 08:19 PM
maybe 75 years ago perhaps. but not todays prison where guards have to worry about offending prisoners.

Watch Lockup on the weekends. Prison is NO JOKE.

ricardisimo
09-04-2013, 09:53 PM
maybe 75 years ago perhaps. but not todays prison where guards have to worry about offending prisoners.
You mean they have to worry about raping prisoners.

<article class="post"> <header> http://cloudfront-assets.reason.com/media/images/mainlogo1.png

Rape Factories (http://reason.com/archives/2011/06/20/rape-factories)

Lovisa Stannow (http://reason.com/people/lovisa-stannow/all)|<time datetime="2011-06-20T20:30:00+00:00">Jun. 20, 2011 4:30 pm</time>
</header> In 1984 the photographer Tom Cahill smashed a plate-glass door in a fit of fury at the San Francisco Chronicle. He had just unsuccessfully attempted to get the paper’s reporters to write about rape in America’s jails and prisons. Cahill was a desperate man at the time, tormented by flashbacks and nightmares, his personal and professional life in ruins.
Cahill’s story began in 1968, when he was arrested in Texas during a peaceful antiwar protest. An Air Force vet who opposed the Vietnam War, he did not prove popular among jail staff in the heavily military town of San Antonio. Before placing him in an overcrowded communal cell, he says, the guards spread word that he was a child molester. Cahill remembers with a shudder how one of the staff members shouted “fresh meat” before leaving. After 24 hours of beatings and gang rape, his life was shattered.
More than four decades later, sexual violence behind bars is still widespread in the United States. But thanks to Cahill and other courageous survivors, the ongoing crisis is no longer shrouded in silence.
The U.S. Department of Justice recently released its first-ever estimate of the number of inmates who are sexually abused in America each year. According to the department’s data, which are based on nationwide surveys of prison and jail inmates as well as young people in juvenile detention centers, at least 216,600 inmates were victimized in 2008 alone. Contrary to popular belief, most of the perpetrators were not other prisoners but staff members—corrections officials whose job it is to keep inmates safe. On average, each victim was abused between three and five times over the course of the year. The vast majority were too fearful of reprisals to seek help or file a formal complaint.
Sexual violence is not an inevitable part of prison life. On the contrary, it is highly preventable. Corrections officials who are committed to running safe facilities train their staff thoroughly. They make sure that inmates who are especially vulnerable to abuse—such as small, mentally ill, and gay or transgender detainees—are not housed with likely perpetrators. And they hold those who commit sexual assaults accountable, even if they are colleagues.
But many corrections administrators are reluctant to make sexual abuse prevention a top priority, preferring to maintain the status quo rather than acknowledge the role their own employees play. Others are actually fighting reform efforts, claiming, in spite of the evidence, that sexual violence is rare.
This resistance is reflected in the slow implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act, which Congress unanimously passed in 2003. The law mandated binding national standards to help end sexual abuse in detention. But almost eight years later, the Justice Department has yet to promulgate final standards.
Attorney General Eric Holder has not shown leadership on this issue. In 2009 Holder essentially rejected standards recommended by a bipartisan commission that spent years studying the problem of prisoner rape, claiming that the recommendations—which included limits on cross-gender supervision and the loosening of deadlines for survivors to file formal grievances—would have been too expensive.
It’s easy to feel numbed by the Justice Department’s estimate that almost 600 prisoners are sexually victimized each day. But behind that number are real people like Jan Lastocy. While serving time for attempted embezzlement in a Michigan prison in 1998, Lastocy was raped. Not once, not twice, but several times a week for seven months. The rapist was an officer who supervised her at a prison warehouse. Lastocy was so afraid of him that she did not even dare to tell her husband of 30 years, John, what was going on. Later John said, “Jan did a stupid thing, and she went to prison for it. But no one should have to pay the price that she did.”
Jan and John Lastocy’s lives were devastated by prisoner rape. Holder should listen to and learn from them rather than bowing to corrections officials trying to maintain the status quo.
Lovisa Stannow (lstannow@justdetention.org) (lstannow@justdetention.org) is executive director of Just Detention International.

</article>

GodfatherofSoul
09-05-2013, 02:34 PM
You mean they have to worry about raping prisoners.

<article class="post"> <header> http://cloudfront-assets.reason.com/media/images/mainlogo1.png

Rape Factories (http://reason.com/archives/2011/06/20/rape-factories)

Lovisa Stannow (http://reason.com/people/lovisa-stannow/all)|<time datetime="2011-06-20T20:30:00+00:00">Jun. 20, 2011 4:30 pm</time>
</header> In 1984 the photographer Tom Cahill smashed a plate-glass door in a fit of fury at the San Francisco Chronicle. He had just unsuccessfully attempted to get the paper’s reporters to write about rape in America’s jails and prisons. Cahill was a desperate man at the time, tormented by flashbacks and nightmares, his personal and professional life in ruins.
Cahill’s story began in 1968, when he was arrested in Texas during a peaceful antiwar protest. An Air Force vet who opposed the Vietnam War, he did not prove popular among jail staff in the heavily military town of San Antonio. Before placing him in an overcrowded communal cell, he says, the guards spread word that he was a child molester. Cahill remembers with a shudder how one of the staff members shouted “fresh meat” before leaving. After 24 hours of beatings and gang rape, his life was shattered.
More than four decades later, sexual violence behind bars is still widespread in the United States. But thanks to Cahill and other courageous survivors, the ongoing crisis is no longer shrouded in silence.
The U.S. Department of Justice recently released its first-ever estimate of the number of inmates who are sexually abused in America each year. According to the department’s data, which are based on nationwide surveys of prison and jail inmates as well as young people in juvenile detention centers, at least 216,600 inmates were victimized in 2008 alone. Contrary to popular belief, most of the perpetrators were not other prisoners but staff members—corrections officials whose job it is to keep inmates safe. On average, each victim was abused between three and five times over the course of the year. The vast majority were too fearful of reprisals to seek help or file a formal complaint.
Sexual violence is not an inevitable part of prison life. On the contrary, it is highly preventable. Corrections officials who are committed to running safe facilities train their staff thoroughly. They make sure that inmates who are especially vulnerable to abuse—such as small, mentally ill, and gay or transgender detainees—are not housed with likely perpetrators. And they hold those who commit sexual assaults accountable, even if they are colleagues.
But many corrections administrators are reluctant to make sexual abuse prevention a top priority, preferring to maintain the status quo rather than acknowledge the role their own employees play. Others are actually fighting reform efforts, claiming, in spite of the evidence, that sexual violence is rare.
This resistance is reflected in the slow implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act, which Congress unanimously passed in 2003. The law mandated binding national standards to help end sexual abuse in detention. But almost eight years later, the Justice Department has yet to promulgate final standards.
Attorney General Eric Holder has not shown leadership on this issue. In 2009 Holder essentially rejected standards recommended by a bipartisan commission that spent years studying the problem of prisoner rape, claiming that the recommendations—which included limits on cross-gender supervision and the loosening of deadlines for survivors to file formal grievances—would have been too expensive.
It’s easy to feel numbed by the Justice Department’s estimate that almost 600 prisoners are sexually victimized each day. But behind that number are real people like Jan Lastocy. While serving time for attempted embezzlement in a Michigan prison in 1998, Lastocy was raped. Not once, not twice, but several times a week for seven months. The rapist was an officer who supervised her at a prison warehouse. Lastocy was so afraid of him that she did not even dare to tell her husband of 30 years, John, what was going on. Later John said, “Jan did a stupid thing, and she went to prison for it. But no one should have to pay the price that she did.”
Jan and John Lastocy’s lives were devastated by prisoner rape. Holder should listen to and learn from them rather than bowing to corrections officials trying to maintain the status quo.
Lovisa Stannow (lstannow@justdetention.org) (lstannow@justdetention.org) is executive director of Just Detention International.

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I watched an episode of Lockup where a guy said he estimated that 20 or 40% (I replayed it on my DVR 10 times and couldn't tell what he said) of inmates had been raped and the outlash afterwards was a large source of prison violence.

JonM229
09-05-2013, 02:42 PM
I watched an episode of Lockup where a guy said he estimated that 20 or 40% (I replayed it on my DVR 10 times and couldn't tell what he said) of inmates had been raped and the outlash afterwards was a large source of prison violence.

A very large majority of men who are reported to be the victim of rape happen to be in jail or prison.

GodfatherofSoul
09-05-2013, 02:53 PM
A very large majority of men who are reported to be the victim of rape happen to be in jail or prison.

Oh yeah, that's what I meant. Guys get raped in prison and lash out at other inmates.

JonM229
09-05-2013, 03:45 PM
Oh yeah, that's what I meant. Guys get raped in prison and lash out at other inmates.

The point I was trying to make though is that without prison rape, there would be extremely few instances of rape with a male victim. We really need to move away from a penal (ha!) system to one of rehabilitation, but that's for a different thread.

ricardisimo
09-05-2013, 03:50 PM
The point I was trying to make though is that without prison rape, there would be extremely few instances of rape with a male victim. We really need to move away from a penal (ha!) system to one of rehabilitation, but that's for a different thread.
Commie

Vis
09-05-2013, 04:01 PM
The point I was trying to make though is that without prison rape, there would be extremely few instances of rape with a male victim. We really need to move away from a penal (ha!) system to one of rehabilitation, but that's for a different thread.

For some. Others are in jail just to remove them from society. Why can't we just get the NSA to spy on prisoners and put the rapist in solitary?

Buddha Bus
09-05-2013, 05:05 PM
Amazing how often child molesters and creeps like Castro manage to hang themselves while under "close surveillance" in prison

Glad the guards did not get in the way :thumbsup::drink::wave:

Shit, they probably put their finger on the knot while he tied it.

GodfatherofSoul
09-05-2013, 05:55 PM
The point I was trying to make though is that without prison rape, there would be extremely few instances of rape with a male victim. We really need to move away from a penal (ha!) system to one of rehabilitation, but that's for a different thread.

Don't get me started on prohibition and the prison industrial complex...