Why register with the Steelers Fever Forums?
 • Intelligent and friendly discussions.
 • It's free and it's quick. Always.
 • Enter events in the forums calendar.
 • Very user friendly software.
 • Exclusive contests and giveaways.

 Donate to Steelers Fever, Click here
 Our 2013 Goal: $400.00 - To Date: $00.00 (00.00%)
 Home | Forums | Editorials | Shop | Tickets | Downloads | Contact Pittsburgh Steelers Forum Feed Not Just Fans. Hardcore Fans.

Go Back   Steelers Fever Forums > Miscellaneous > Locker Room


Steelers Fever Fan Shop

Doc's Sports Get FREE NFL Picks and College Football picks as well as Football Lines like live NFL Lines and updated NFL Power Rankings all at Doc's Sports Service.

Steelers Steelers - Giants Giants
August 9th, 2014, 7:30pmET

CBS
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-01-2014, 07:26 AM   #1
JonM229
Team Owner
 
JonM229's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Ball So Hard University
Posts: 2,825
Gender: Male
Member Number: 24803
Thanks: 6,898
Thanked 5,806 Times in 2,119 Posts
My Mood: Goofy
Default Texas Board of Education Approves Textbook Review Changes

Texas Board Approves Textbook Rule Changes

Quote:
The Texas Board of Education imposed tighter rules Friday on the citizen review panels that scrutinize proposed textbooks, potentially softening fights over evolution, religion's role in U.S. history and other ideological matters that have long seeped into what students learn in school.

Tension over the issue has been building for years in the country's second most populous state, where the textbook market is so large that changes can affect the industry nationwide. Critics complain that a few activists with religious or political objections have too much power to shape what the state's more than 5 million public school students are taught.

The 15-member education board approves textbooks for school districts to use, but objections raised by reviewers can influence its decisions. The volunteer review panels are often dominated by social conservatives who want more skepticism about evolution included in science textbooks, arguing that a higher power helped create the universe.

The board also had long been controlled by social conservatives before election defeats weakened their voting bloc in recent years but not before its culture war clashes drew national headlines. Those members pushed for deemphasizing climate change in science classes, and requiring social studies students to learn about the Christian values of America's founding fathers and evaluate whether the United Nations undermined U.S. sovereignty.

Among the changes approved Friday was a mandate that teachers or professors be given priority for serving on the textbook review panels for subjects in their areas of expertise. They also enable the board to appoint outside experts to check objections raised by review panels and ensure they are based on fact, not ideology.

"It won't eliminate politics, but it will make it where it's a more informed process," said Thomas Ratliff, a Republican board member who pushed for the changes, which he said "force us to find qualified people, leave them alone, and let them do their jobs."

The new rules were unanimously approved.

An outspoken conservative on the board, David Bradley, said he did his best to insert language mitigating what was approved. But he said "liberals are really trying to make it difficult for Christians and conservatives to have a voice in public education."

"Certainly there are some members that were unhappy with some of the experts that we've had in the past and certain reviewers," said Bradley, a Republican from Beaumont.

"Maybe it's embarrassing when citizens step forth and show some of the blatant inaccuracies in our American history, references to our founding fathers, our Christian heritage, truly errors. But to try and silence them with intimidation, I think, is wrong and that's what this is all about," he said.

Other changes require proposed books to be reviewed by at least two panel members, so that a single volunteer can't raise objections. The new rules also require panelists to submit majority and minority reports about proposed material, and restrict board members' contact with reviewers to avoid unfair influence.

A more ambitious plan that would have allowed the education board to remove panelists for inappropriate behavior failed 9-6 earlier in the week.

Friday's changes will take effect before the board tackles the potentially thorny adoption of new social studies textbooks later this year. The board can force publishers to edit the content of textbooks for such classes, sometimes based on review panel suggestions, because Texas has such a large market for the books, and those revisions can make it into textbooks sold around the country.

The catalyst for revamping the citizen review panels came last summer, when ardent evolution skeptics including a nutritionist and a chemical engineer caused a tumultuous fight. They challenged a proposed biology textbook that they claimed contained too much information on natural selection, Charles Darwin's theory on how life on earth evolved.

Ratliff refused to predict whether they would help avoid the raucous board debates of the past. But he said the education board has come a long way.

"This board is more cohesive and more policy driven than I believe we've been in a long time," he said. "Which is not good for headlines but it's good for public education."

Though modest, the changes could indeed have a major impact in Texas where Republican Gov. Rick Perry bragged during his 2011 presidential campaign that students were taught both evolution and creationism.

The previous year, the education board approved social studies and history curriculum in which children learned that the words "separation of church and state" were not in the Constitution. And, Thomas Jefferson was replaced as an example of an influential political philosopher with the likes of John Calvin, celebrated by the religious right.

Still, Friday's changes only deal only with textbook reviews and won't stop larger clashes by education board members about textbooks. They also won't affect panels that vet proposed curriculums.

The vote was a positive step, but "we'd like to see even stronger protections against political meddling," said Kathy Miller, president of the Texas Freedom Network, a watchdog group that keeps tabs on the education board.

"It's way past time to stop (board) members and activists with an ax to grind from manipulating this process and politicizing our students' textbooks," she said.
Looks like we can welcome Texas to the 21st century (finally)
__________________

"I don't know about you Joe, but I would say that qualifies as elite." -Barack Obama
JonM229 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to JonM229 For This Useful Post:
Buddha Bus (02-01-2014), harrison'samonster (02-01-2014)
Old 02-01-2014, 11:25 AM   #2
FanSince72
Team President
 
FanSince72's Avatar
 

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: New York
Posts: 2,235
Member Number: 17502
Thanks: 292
Thanked 1,055 Times in 473 Posts
Default Re: Texas Board of Education Approves Textbook Review Changes

Quote:
...and requiring social studies students to learn about the Christian values of America's founding fathers...
This particular thinking cracks me up because it demonstrates a severe lack of knowledge of just who our "Founding Fathers" were and what they REALLY believed.


Here are some quotes from various letters and statements written by some of those men regarding religion and Christianity which demonstrate that the mythology of who they were does not dovetail with reality:
John Adams-

"Nowhere in the Gospels do we find a precept for Creeds, Confessions, Oaths, Doctrines, and whole cartloads of other foolish trumpery that we find in Christianity."

Thomas Jefferson-

"I have recently been examining all the known superstitions of the world, and do not find in our particular superstition (Christianity) one redeeming feature. They are all alike founded on fables and mythology."

Thomas Paine-

"The study of theology, as it stands in the Christian churches, is the study of nothing; it is founded on nothing; it rests on no principles; it proceeds by no authority; it has no data; it can demonstrate nothing; and it admits of no conclusion."

James Madison-

"Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise."

Benjamin Franklin-

"Lighthouses are more helpful than churches."

"In the affairs of the world, men are saved not by faith, but by the lack of it."

"The way to see by faith is to shut the eye of reason."

__________________
http://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag37/JPsuff/comment2a.jpg
FanSince72 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to FanSince72 For This Useful Post:
Bane (02-01-2014), Buddha Bus (02-01-2014), harrison'samonster (02-01-2014), JonM229 (02-01-2014)
Old 02-01-2014, 05:01 PM   #3
Wagen
Bench Warmer
Supporter
 

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Black Country, England
Posts: 300
Gender: Male
Member Number: 25328
Thanks: 524
Thanked 382 Times in 187 Posts
My Mood: Fine
Default Re: Texas Board of Education Approves Textbook Review Changes

Quote:
Originally Posted by FanSince72 View Post
This particular thinking cracks me up because it demonstrates a severe lack of knowledge of just who our "Founding Fathers" were and what they REALLY believed.


Here are some quotes from various letters and statements written by some of those men regarding religion and Christianity which demonstrate that the mythology of who they were does not dovetail with reality:
John Adams-

"Nowhere in the Gospels do we find a precept for Creeds, Confessions, Oaths, Doctrines, and whole cartloads of other foolish trumpery that we find in Christianity."

Thomas Jefferson-

"I have recently been examining all the known superstitions of the world, and do not find in our particular superstition (Christianity) one redeeming feature. They are all alike founded on fables and mythology."

Thomas Paine-

"The study of theology, as it stands in the Christian churches, is the study of nothing; it is founded on nothing; it rests on no principles; it proceeds by no authority; it has no data; it can demonstrate nothing; and it admits of no conclusion."

James Madison-

"Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise."

Benjamin Franklin-

"Lighthouses are more helpful than churches."

"In the affairs of the world, men are saved not by faith, but by the lack of it."

"The way to see by faith is to shut the eye of reason."

It is not just the lack of knowledge that gets me.

Even if the Founding Fathers of the US were Christian, they would have been no more or less Christian than their British counterparts. So I'm not exactly sure what that proves.

It sort of reminds me of the Hitler was an atheist, and Darwin equals Nazi arguments which are both utter lies, and prove nothing anyway.

I have never had a problem with Creationism being taught in school....just as long as it isn't in a science class. Creationism and ID do not belong there.
Wagen is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Wagen For This Useful Post:
Buddha Bus (02-03-2014), harrison'samonster (02-01-2014), JonM229 (02-02-2014)
Old 02-02-2014, 08:53 AM   #4
FanSince72
Team President
 
FanSince72's Avatar
 

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: New York
Posts: 2,235
Member Number: 17502
Thanks: 292
Thanked 1,055 Times in 473 Posts
Default Re: Texas Board of Education Approves Textbook Review Changes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wagen View Post
It is not just the lack of knowledge that gets me.

Even if the Founding Fathers of the US were Christian, they would have been no more or less Christian than their British counterparts. So I'm not exactly sure what that proves.

It sort of reminds me of the Hitler was an atheist, and Darwin equals Nazi arguments which are both utter lies, and prove nothing anyway.

I have never had a problem with Creationism being taught in school....just as long as it isn't in a science class. Creationism and ID do not belong there.
I don't think religion of any kind should be in a PUBLIC school.

Just as I believe that religion doesn't belong in public meetings like Town Boards, Legislatures, etc.

Where I live (as I'm sure is true elsewhere), Town Board and Legislative meetings begin with a convocation from a clergy person and since the public-at-large is secular in nature, these governing bodies invite clergy from various religious groups to begin each meeting. This seems fine on its surface until you stop to consider how many religious beliefs exist in a given area and realize that it's virtually impossible to represent them all and so having clergy from only the "popular" religions automatically shuts out many people.

What if, for example, there existed a substantial group of Wiccans, or Bhuddists, or Shintoists and so on?
When can any of those groups expect to be represented in some future convocation?

Or what if you're an atheist?

It's wiser to simply eliminate such rituals altogether and perhaps use that time for a simple moment of silence (if any such contemplative moment is even necessary) than to risk alienating even a small group of people.
__________________
http://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag37/JPsuff/comment2a.jpg
FanSince72 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to FanSince72 For This Useful Post:
Buddha Bus (02-03-2014), harrison'samonster (02-02-2014)
Old 02-02-2014, 10:45 AM   #5
Wagen
Bench Warmer
Supporter
 

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Black Country, England
Posts: 300
Gender: Male
Member Number: 25328
Thanks: 524
Thanked 382 Times in 187 Posts
My Mood: Fine
Default Re: Texas Board of Education Approves Textbook Review Changes

Quote:
Originally Posted by FanSince72 View Post
I don't think religion of any kind should be in a PUBLIC school.

Just as I believe that religion doesn't belong in public meetings like Town Boards, Legislatures, etc.

Where I live (as I'm sure is true elsewhere), Town Board and Legislative meetings begin with a convocation from a clergy person and since the public-at-large is secular in nature, these governing bodies invite clergy from various religious groups to begin each meeting. This seems fine on its surface until you stop to consider how many religious beliefs exist in a given area and realize that it's virtually impossible to represent them all and so having clergy from only the "popular" religions automatically shuts out many people.

What if, for example, there existed a substantial group of Wiccans, or Bhuddists, or Shintoists and so on?
When can any of those groups expect to be represented in some future convocation?

Or what if you're an atheist?

It's wiser to simply eliminate such rituals altogether and perhaps use that time for a simple moment of silence (if any such contemplative moment is even necessary) than to risk alienating even a small group of people.
Agreed. But I didn't mean that Creationist beliefs should be supported in schools.

In England, there is a school subject called Religious Studies, which is not intended to indoctrinate or proselytise. It is about religion in general. It would only be in this kind of subject that teaching about Creationism would be appropriate.
Wagen is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Wagen For This Useful Post:
Buddha Bus (02-03-2014), JonM229 (02-02-2014)
Old 02-02-2014, 11:13 AM   #6
JonM229
Team Owner
 
JonM229's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Ball So Hard University
Posts: 2,825
Gender: Male
Member Number: 24803
Thanks: 6,898
Thanked 5,806 Times in 2,119 Posts
My Mood: Goofy
Default Re: Texas Board of Education Approves Textbook Review Changes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wagen View Post
Agreed. But I didn't mean that Creationist beliefs should be supported in schools.

In England, there is a school subject called Religious Studies, which is not intended to indoctrinate or proselytise. It is about religion in general. It would only be in this kind of subject that teaching about Creationism would be appropriate.
I took a Mythology course in college where they taught the three Abrahamic religions right along with every other world religions.
__________________

"I don't know about you Joe, but I would say that qualifies as elite." -Barack Obama
JonM229 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2014, 11:26 AM   #7
FanSince72
Team President
 
FanSince72's Avatar
 

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: New York
Posts: 2,235
Member Number: 17502
Thanks: 292
Thanked 1,055 Times in 473 Posts
Default Re: Texas Board of Education Approves Textbook Review Changes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wagen View Post
Agreed. But I didn't mean that Creationist beliefs should be supported in schools.

In England, there is a school subject called Religious Studies, which is not intended to indoctrinate or proselytise. It is about religion in general. It would only be in this kind of subject that teaching about Creationism would be appropriate.
I think George Carlin summed it up best when after logically reducing the Ten Commandments to just two, he added one more that said: "Keep thy religion to thyself".

He wasn't wrong.
__________________
http://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag37/JPsuff/comment2a.jpg
FanSince72 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to FanSince72 For This Useful Post:
Buddha Bus (02-03-2014), JonM229 (02-02-2014)
Old 02-03-2014, 05:40 AM   #8
SteelerEmpire
Team President
 
SteelerEmpire's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 2,324
Gender: Male
Member Number: 14355
Thanks: 1,131
Thanked 1,522 Times in 691 Posts
Default Re: Texas Board of Education Approves Textbook Review Changes

Quote:
"It won't eliminate politics, but it will make it where it's a more informed process,"
__________________

A HOUSE DIVIDED WILL FALL TO IT'S ENEMIES;
BUT IN UNITY THERE ARE 6' SUPER BOWLS !!!
SteelerEmpire is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to SteelerEmpire For This Useful Post:
Buddha Bus (02-03-2014)
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Shoutbox provided by vBShout v6.2.1 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.0.8 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.
Navbar with Avatar by Motorradforum
no new posts