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Old 04-12-2007, 12:24 AM   #1911
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Default Re: Pens Tidbits

Senators' experience clobbers Pens' youth

By Rob Rossi
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, April 12, 2007

OTTAWA - A few shifts. That is how long defenseman Ryan Whitney had guessed he and 13 Penguins teammates would need Wednesday to skate off the nervousness that accompanied their NHL postseason debuts.

After that, Whitney figured, Game 1 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinal series against the playoff-tested Ottawa Senators would begin to resemble the Penguins' 82 regular-season games.

"What's better than the first 10 minutes of Game 1?" Whitney said before the Penguins' playoff opener. "It's about coming out and being confident, not being on our heels.

"After the first few shifts, everything will settle down."

Forgive Whitney if the mass of red that was Scotiabank Place seemed about as settling as a wildfire. Early in their convincing, 6-3 victory over the Penguins, the Senators were that hot.

Twenty minutes into the playoff careers of most of the Penguins players, they trailed, 2-0, and had managed only four shots -- none of them posing much danger of getting past Ottawa goaltender Ray Emery.

Conversely, Ottawa peppered goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with 16 shots over the first 20 minutes, all the while playing the ace card that was its vast playoff-experience advantage.

"Experience is one of those things that you don't know how it's going to work out," Ottawa center Jason Spezza said. "Ours definitely helped us tonight."

The Senators improved to 26-10 when scoring first in a playoff game.

Ottawa entered this series with a 2-6 mark in the playoffs when they dropped an opener. However, such a poor record did not fuel a desire to chase the Penguins into the first intermission.

"I didn't even know that stat," Ottawa right wing Daniel Alfredsson said. "We talked about trying to take momentum right away, and we were able to do that because we started well."

Despite their dominance last night, the Senators conceded that an opening victory does not a series make. Whether the young players among the Penguins can put a disappointing playoff debut behind them could shape the remainder of this one.

"You have to lose four to lose a series, so you have to keep your focus. I didn't realize that when I was younger," Spezza said. "Keeping your focus is not easy to do."

That is the challenge that will await the Penguins in Game 2 on Saturday. Perhaps the Penguins can take comfort in knowing that 16 times during the regular season they followed a loss with a victory.

"We have bounced back all year long," rookie Jordan Staal said. "It's a long series."

The Penguins can only hope.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pitt.../s_502313.html
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Old 04-12-2007, 12:26 AM   #1912
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Default Re: Pens Tidbits

Ottawa's Fisher draws assignment of containing Crosby

By The Tribune-Review
Thursday, April 12, 2007

For all of the Ottawa Senators' offensive firepower, the key to advancing past the Penguins in the best-of-seven playoff series might come in the form of a player who scored just four goals over his final 21 regular-season games. As was the case during the regular season, Senators center Mike Fisher drew the responsibility of stopping league-leading scorer Sidney Crosby.

"I don't know if you actually stop him," Fisher said. "Against Sidney, you just try to keep him from going off."

Fisher and the Senators did something right against Crosby during the regular season, limiting him to a goal and four points over four games. Crosby has totaled only five points in seven career games against the Senators. Consensus among Ottawa's players credited Fisher, one of the league's surest defensive forwards.

"Sid battles and competes, so for me it's about keeping my feet moving and not giving him much time," Fisher said. "He can draw penalties so easily that I need to make sure I'm in good position and use my speed."

? Ottawa goaltender Ray Emery said he did not expect this series to become a high-scoring affair, despite the Senators and Penguins posting the second- and third-most regular-season goals, respectively.

"I don't think they'll come running and gunning too much," Emery said of the Penguins. "They realize that you can make mistakes that way, and they want to limit their mistakes. We do, too. With both of these teams, chances can turn into goals fast."

? Winger Jarkko Ruutu didn't have a point in the Penguins' final regular-season game against the Senators, but he deserved credit for two of their goals with his feisty play. Ruutu, who was about to put the Senators on the power play for an attempted charge at Ottawa center Jason Spezza behind the net, said something that made Spezza lose his composure. Spezza elbowed Ruutu and was called for roughing and elbowing to cancel out his team's power play and put the Senators down a man for five minutes. The Penguins scored twice to erase a 1-0 deficit.

"I don't think you can go looking for it, but you have to take a chance and you have to go hard," Ruutu said of attempting to coax penalties out of the other teams' players. "That's what it's really all about it. There's a lot of guys that don't like to get hit that get rattled and will try to get back at you instead of trying to score goals."

? With so many young players on the Penguins' roster, the experience of veterans and Stanley Cup winners Gary Roberts and Mark Recchi could prove invaluable during these playoffs.

"Gary had a lot of good things to say in our meetings from his experiences, but for the most part it's going to be watching them raise their game," forward Erik Christensen said. "They're the ones to watch. For a young guy like me, that's important."

? The Penguins scratched the following players for Game 1: defensemen Joel Kwiatkowski and Alain Nasreddine, center Chris Thornburn and right wings Ronald Petrovicky and Nils Ekman.


Digits


3 - Consecutive opening-round playoff series won by the Penguins

.714 - Ottawa's postseason winning percentage when scoring the first goal

.333 - Penguins' postseason winning percentage in Canada

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pitt.../s_502290.html
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Old 04-12-2007, 12:28 AM   #1913
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Default Re: Pens Tidbits

No, Ms. Trautman, the Pens aren't going to win the Cup this season. They may not win a game if they don't turn things around, and quick.

About 1,000 show for Pens rally

By Andrew Conte
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, April 12, 2007

Linda Trautman, 50, of Crafton Heights dug into her basement for the homemade Stanley Cup she fashioned more than 15 years ago.

Mayor Luke Ravenstahl, in the great tradition of hockey players and fans, started growing a playoff beard -- although he vowed to keep it trimmed.

And about 1,000 Penguins fans -- many wearing hockey sweaters, a few in business suits -- gathered in the courtyard of the Allegheny County Courthouse at noon Wednesday.

For the first time since 2001, the Penguins are back in the playoffs.

"We're gonna win the cup," said Jodie Chirico, 31, of Verona, holding a sign she made and standing on the edge of the courtyard fountain that was filled with floating, inflatable penguins.

Allegheny County Chief Executive Dan Onorato thanked Penguins co-owner and former player Mario Lemieux for working to keep the team in Pittsburgh with a new arena.

The team and public officials announced the agreement last month and celebrated the start of demolition Tuesday to make way for the Uptown building. It's scheduled to open in 2009.

The arena negotiation process "might have been ugly -- not pretty -- but the end result is that the Penguins will be right where they belong for at least the next 30 years," Onorato told the crowd.

Ted Black, the Penguins' vice president of business and legal affairs, handed out hockey sweaters to public officials and urged fans to move past the uncertainty that has surrounded the team off the ice for years.

"Today, we embrace a new era for the team," Black told the fans, saying they no longer had to worry about the Penguins declaring bankruptcy or relocating to another city.

Separately, team officials tried to arrange a meeting with Hill District residents and community leaders, but that session was put off until Onorato returns from a weeklong trade mission to China. He leaves Friday.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pitt.../s_502288.html
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Old 04-12-2007, 12:30 AM   #1914
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Revved-up Senators shoot into playoff gear

Thursday, April 12, 2007
By Shelly Anderson, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

OTTAWA -- A freight train through your living room wouldn't have had much more of an impact than the Ottawa Senators had on the Penguins early in their playoff-opening game.

The Senators showed the inexperienced Penguins what playoff gear looks like -- it's several notches above drive and barely below a red-line situation -- and used that to score a couple of quick goals before piling it on in their 6-3 win last night at Scotiabank Place to take the lead in their first-round series.

"We did come out real strong," Ottawa captain Daniel Alfredsson said. "We got our forecheck going. We talked about that -- try to take the momentum right away, use the crowd, get them into it.

"We got some good chances right away, got the goal and never looked back."

Defenseman Andrej Meszaros took advantage of Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury's little stumble in the crease to open the scoring at 1:37 of the first period. Center Chris Kelly upped that to 2-0 at 6:38 when he slid the puck under Fleury.

"We set the tone, coming out hard," said Ottawa goaltender Ray Emery, who stopped 23 of 26 shots. "When we got a couple of goals, it set them on their heels."

That was the plan all along. It always is.

The Senators were a little surprised at how well it worked.

"I think we expected a close, tight series and a close, tight game," Emery said. "That's why we came out so hard.

"I don't think it's going to be like that every game, though."

For 12 of the Penguins, this was their first NHL playoff game. All but one of the Senators, defenseman Joseph Corvo, knew first-hand what the postseason is all about.

"I think we were really good early," Ottawa coach Bryan Murray said. "I don't think we were very nervous. We had lots of energy. I don't know if we can get out of the box like that every night, but we came out and displayed a lot of experience."

At every chance, and that includes many produced through tenacity, Ottawa whipped, slipped and tipped the puck toward Fleury.

The Senators led in shots, 29-12, after two periods and finished with a 37-26 advantage.

Alfredsson led the way with eight shots, all in the first two periods, as well as five that he launched but went wide of the net.

"We talked about throwing it at the net, try to get people in front. We did create a lot of chances," said Alfredsson, who didn't get a goal but had an assist and helped set the lightning pace early.

"We missed the net a lot," Murray said. "[The score] could have been a little more than it was."

Penguins coach Michel Therrien eventually was swayed to pull Fleury in favor of veteran backup Jocelyn Thibault about midway through the third period after the Senators got their sixth goal.

"We've got to be happy with this game, but they're going to adjust," Alfredsson said.

"They're going to look at the tapes. They've got two days. They're going to come out a different team on Saturday."

Before the game, Murray downplayed the importance of taking control of the series based on what happens in any particular game.

"I think every game's important," he said. "I don't know of any tones [that are set] or anything else. I think they're individual games."

After the Senators' dominating performance, that might not be the case. There could be some carryover.

"I think so," Emery said. "I think the first game of the series kind of sets the tone."

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07102/777365-61.stm
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Old 04-12-2007, 12:35 AM   #1915
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Penguins Notebook: It's a new experience for most of team

Thursday, April 12, 2007
By Dave Molinari, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

OTTAWA -- No fewer than 12 of the Penguins who dressed for Game 1 of their opening-round series against Ottawa last night were making their NHL playoff debuts.

Most acknowledged that they expected to be nervous as the opening faceoff approached, although no one appeared to be particularly tight during their game-day skate at Scotiabank Place.

"It felt like any other morning skate," said 18-year-old center Jordan Staal.

The Penguins are in the playoffs for the first time since 2001, but have several players who competed for the Stanley Cup more recently. That does not mean those guys were blase about the start of the postseason.

"I don't think you ever get used to it," said winger Jarkko Ruutu, who made 24 playoff appearances with Vancouver. "It really gets to you when the first game starts. Especially being in Canada, the hype and everything around it is unbelievable."

Defenseman Mark Eaton, who appeared in seven playoff games with Philadelphia and 11 with Nashville, described his feelings as "a good nervousness" that enhances the experience.

"It's the best time of the year, the most fun time," he said. "It's everything we play for."

Turning a deaf ear

Although Ottawa coach Bryan Murray tried to cast his team as the underdogs in Round 1 -- "I listen to lots of the observations and many, many people think that Pittsburgh [is] the team that's going to beat us, without a doubt," he told reporters Tuesday -- it seemed that a majority of observers predicted the Senators will win this series.

Those forecasts, Penguins defenseman Brooks Orpik said, didn't appear to have much of an impact on his teammates.

"I don't think we really care," he said. "We're more worried about what's going on in this locker room. We were 3-1 against them and we won twice [at Scotiabank Place].

"If people want to pick them, that's fine. When you pick that team, it just puts more pressure on them to win."

A goalie primer

Because the Penguins faced Ottawa goalie Ray Emery in the penultimate game of the regular season, they probably did not need much of a refresher on him before Game 1.

Nonetheless, Penguins goaltending coach Gilles Meloche put together a scouting report about Emery's strengths and flaws.

"We told them what we think his game is, how he plays," Meloche said. "Just the basics of his style and tendencies."

He also noted that about "half of this team has played [against Emery] for four or five years," mostly in the American Hockey League.

Meloche also reaffirmed his faith in Penguins goalie Marc-Andre Fleury, who has had a spotty record in high-stakes games the past few years.

"We've been talking about the playoffs for the last 10 days, tried to approach the last couple of [regular-season] games like playoff games," Meloche said. "Just to make sure he keeps his concentration and plays the way he's been playing."

No fundamental changes

Coach Michel Therrien entered Game 1 assuming he would have to make adjustments over the course of the evening. And, for that matter, the course of the series.

But he would not, Therrien said, be making fundamental revisions in the way his team plays.

"We're not going to start changing things because we're in the playoffs," he said. "Are we going to start changing our system, the way we play? No. We're going to play our own game. We're going to focus on us, to make sure we're successful."

Slap shots

The Penguins' healthy scratches were forwards Ronald Petrovicky, Nils Ekman and Chris Thorburn and defensemen Alain Nasreddine and Joel Kwiatkowski. ... Ottawa has won 11 Stanley Cups, but none since 1927. A celebrated member of that championship squad, King Clancy, coached the Pittsburgh Hornets to the Calder Cup championship in 1952.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07102/777372-61.stm
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Old 04-12-2007, 12:38 AM   #1916
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Ottawa Notebook: Goaltender has early memories of Penguins

Thursday, April 12, 2007
By Shelly Anderson, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

OTTAWA -- In the days leading up to the start of the playoffs, Senators goaltender Ray Emery told reporters his earliest memory of watching the playoffs was when the Penguins won the Stanley Cup in 1991 and '92.

Emery, 24, would have been 8 and 9 those springs.

Yesterday, Emery made it clear that doesn't mean he grew up in Hamilton, Ontario, as a Penguins fan.

"I was a Leaf fan," he said of Toronto. "I hated the Penguins, but my Leafs never made the playoffs."

The Penguins, with Mario Lemieux and Jaromir Jagr, were just the team to watch when it got to be May those years.

"I watched a bit," Emery said. "I think everyone did."

Emery did not find himself wanting to emulate the Penguins' Cup-winning goaltender.

"I wasn't a big Tom Barrasso fan, no," he said. "I liked my Leaf guys and I liked [Philadelphia's Ron] Hextall and a few other guys, but I wasn't a big Barrasso fan."

Hockey Night shut out

Some Canadian media outlets have raised a fuss because Game 2 of the Ottawa-Penguins series will start at 3:08 p.m. Saturday. That means it was set up for an NBC broadcast in the United States -- no doubt to showcase Penguins star Sidney Crosby -- and won't be on the highly popular "Hockey Night in Canada."

Ottawa is the only Canadian team in the Eastern Conference playoffs.

Yesterday, according to the Halifax Daily News, the Nova Scotia provincial government got involved, sending NHL commissioner Gary Bettman a message saying the game should be in the evening on HNIC.

Crosby is from Nova Scotia.

Senators top-line center Jason Spezza grew up in Toronto watching HNIC like most kids, but he's not letting himself get caught up in the controversy.

"Whatever the schedule says, whatever the time, you've just got to show up," he said.

Spezza proves productive

Spezza had 87 points this season to tie for 15th in the NHL, but he played in only 67 games, so his average of 1.30 points a game was fifth-highest in the league among players who appeared in at least 60 games. The top four were the Penguins' Crosby (1.52), San Jose's Joe Thornton (1.39), Calgary's Jarome Iginla (1.34) and Tampa Bay's Vincent Lecavalier (1.32).

Optional skating

Ottawa's morning skate was optional, and all but five players took part. Senators coach Bryan Murray said that's fairly typical. "There are guys that we don't want going on the ice, and they go out some days," Murray said. "I've tried to make, in the past month or thereabouts, it available if they want to."

Sign 'em up

Being in the playoffs has not kept the Senators from taking care of some business. General manager John Muckler announced that defenseman Chris Phillips has been signed to a four-year deal, reportedly worth about $14 million. Phillips, 29, had a career-high eight goals and 26 points in 82 games this season and tied for the second-most average ice time (22 minutes, 31 seconds a game).

Senators scratches

Ottawa scratched defenseman Lawrence Nycholat and wingers Brian McGrattan and Oleg Saprykin.
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Old 04-12-2007, 12:41 AM   #1917
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Cook: Therrien's deflection of pressure deflates

Thursday, April 12, 2007
By Ron Cook, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

OTTAWA -- Penguins coach Michel Therrien spent a significant portion of his time with the NHL media yesterday telling everybody how his young team wasn't expected to still be playing this late in April. It was a predictable, even logical, first volley in the inevitable gamesmanship that boils over in every Stanley Cup playoff series. Put the pressure on the Ottawa Senators, Therrien figured. They're the Stanley Cup contenders. They're also the team with a reputation of choking in the playoffs. Let them feel as if they have everything to lose.

Smart strategy, to be sure.

Too bad it blew up on Therrien.

His message seemed to resonate with the Penguins more than it did the Senators. His team went out for Game 1 last night and played as if it wanted to prove him right.

It played as if it doesn't belong in the playoffs.

The good news is the 6-3 rout was only one game. As Badger Bob Johnson once said so famously during a Penguins Stanley Cup run a lifetime ago, holding up three stubby fingers, "You can lose three games and still win the series."

The hope for the Penguins is that they learned something from this loss. Not the loss so much, but the playoff experience. It was the first for most of them, including all of the top stars.

It showed.

Boy, did it show.

"We definitely weren't ready to play at their level," Penguins veteran winger Mark Recchi said, clearly failing, at least in this game, in passing on his wisdom, honed by years of playoff experience and a couple of Stanley Cup titles, to his young teammates.

"Them playing the first game at home, you expect a storm. You have to try to quiet it down as much as you can. We didn't do a very good job of that."

Sidney Crosby is the world's best player, but he wasn't prepared for the Senators' intensity. He had a third-period goal disallowed because the officials ruled he kicked the puck into the net and he scored a meaningless power-play goal in the final minute, but he was mostly invisible.

"It's faster and more intense," Crosby said of playoff hockey.

Marc-Andre Fleury might win multiple Cup titles before his career is finished, but he couldn't have expected what the Senators threw at him at the start. It's fair to blame nerves for Fleury tripping over his goal post -- then his own skates -- and stumbling as defenseman Andrej Meszaros blew a routine slap shot by him 97 seconds into the game. Fleury, abandoned by his defense, ended up fishing five more pucks out of his net before Therrien pulled him for Jocelyn Thibault about midway through the third period, not as a sign of his displeasure with Fleury, but to put a merciful ending to the kid's evening. Although it's true what Crosby said -- "Fleury played great" -- that first goal set a lousy tone. If it didn't, the one scored by Chris Kelly five minutes later for a 2-0 Ottawa lead surely did.

"It seemed like they were always there, always coming back for more," Fleury said.

Evgeni Malkin? He did nothing. Nada. No shots.

Only Jordan Staal, among the Penguins' young kids, seemed unfazed in the playoff cauldron. He did superb work in helping the Penguins kill two lengthy five-on-three power plays. He also scored their first goal.

It was one of the few highlights.

"I think we got caught watching a little bit instead of trying to set the tone," Crosby said of the Penguins' horrendous start.

Added Recchi, "Now we know what to expect."

It will be interesting to see how the Penguins respond for Game 2 Saturday afternoon and beyond. If they really do buy into that nonsense Therrien was trying to sell the Senators and start believing that nothing is expected of them in the playoffs, that's exactly what they'll give on the ice.

Nothing.

The Penguins can't start believing that garbage that they have nothing to lose because they're such a young team. They matched the Senators point for point in the regular season. This series is there for them to win as much as it is for Ottawa.

One caveat, though:

If the Penguins start feeling as if they should be satisfied with their marvelous regular season, they'll have no chance. They'll also be doing themselves a serious disservice. Playoff appearances are too precious to be wasted.

"We didn't bring our best," Crosby said, agreeing with that logic. "If we threw everything at them and this was the result, we might be questioning ourselves. But that's not the case. We've got a lot more to show."

Game 2 would be a nice time to start.

The Penguins got their playoff nerves out of the way and were embarrassed in the process.

Now, it's time to play hockey.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07102/777359-87.stm
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Old 04-12-2007, 07:57 AM   #1918
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Losing like this was bound to happen. The Penguins are young and inexperienced. We'll get 'em back Saturday, though. Hold you heads up, guys.
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Old 04-12-2007, 08:33 AM   #1919
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edman View Post
Losing like this was bound to happen. The Penguins are young and inexperienced. We'll get 'em back Saturday, though. Hold you heads up, guys.
Maybe, just maybe our youngs guns needed an arse whoopin' like last night's game to give them a taste of what the NHL playoffs are really like.
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Old 04-12-2007, 10:52 AM   #1920
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Hopefully they can shake it off and get back in it. IMO Their puck handling looked horrible. I love hockey but I am no expert of the game by far.
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