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Old 01-12-2009, 01:48 AM   #1
Aussie_steeler
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Default How the Combine Industry impacts the Draft Process

An interesting read for those already looking forward to the draft

Quote:
An oft overlooked aspect of the NFL Draft process is the Combine Prep industry, also known as Speed Camps. Speed Camps are locations where those players lucky enough to be perceived as the best draft-declarations spend the spare weeks between the end of the college season and their workouts in front of NFL scouts and decision-makers.

As the name would imply, a player goes to a speed camp with the main intent of improving their timed speed, especially in the 40-yard dash. While there, an athlete is housed locally and goes through an intensive program designed by professional trainers. The athletes are segregated from their previous life, no wild campus parties or sitting in academic classes, instead their days are filled with working-out, every day, for hours at a time. The founders of these locations often have advanced degrees in human physiology. Some of these professionals that run these camps are former pro football players, or even Olympic sprinters, and they convey the tricks and techniques that, over the course of a few weeks, should whittle tenths of a second off of a workout time.

In the case of the 40-yard dash, the opportunities for improved execution are everywhere; from a sound sprinters start, to staying low through the first few yards, all the way through to a well executed lean at the finish-line, these improvements can add up to significant improvements to the times that these athletes run. In the "speed-kills" mentality of NFL talent evaluators, those tenths of seconds often add up to millions of dollars in guaranteed money on Draft Day. With the pyramid salary structure of the NFL draft, the top picks earn exponentially more than those selected down the line.
An oft overlooked aspect of the NFL Draft process is the Combine Prep industry, also known as Speed Camps. Speed Camps are locations where those players lucky enough to be perceived as the best draft-declarations spend the spare weeks between the end of the college season and their workouts in front of NFL scouts and decision-makers.

As the name would imply, a player goes to a speed camp with the main intent of improving their timed speed, especially in the 40-yard dash. While there, an athlete is housed locally and goes through an intensive program designed by professional trainers. The athletes are segregated from their previous life, no wild campus parties or sitting in academic classes, instead their days are filled with working-out, every day, for hours at a time. The founders of these locations often have advanced degrees in human physiology. Some of these professionals that run these camps are former pro football players, or even Olympic sprinters, and they convey the tricks and techniques that, over the course of a few weeks, should whittle tenths of a second off of a workout time.

In the case of the 40-yard dash, the opportunities for improved execution are everywhere; from a sound sprinters start, to staying low through the first few yards, all the way through to a well executed lean at the finish-line, these improvements can add up to significant improvements to the times that these athletes run. In the "speed-kills" mentality of NFL talent evaluators, those tenths of seconds often add up to millions of dollars in guaranteed money on Draft Day. With the pyramid salary structure of the NFL draft, the top picks earn exponentially more than those selected down the line.

A very interesting read - For the full article

http://www.draftdaddy.com/features/speed.htm


One interesting quote that I particularly liked was

Quote:
As fans of the site will know, we at Draft Daddy love to spotlight the underdogs: the undrafted players, the sleepers, the unknown small schoolers who go on to accomplish great things against great odds. However in an age of elite speed camps, the jump for these players is even more difficult than it was in years past. While it is possible for a player to train on his own, perhaps in his old high school or college facilities, and work hard to become a great player in the league, these players are at a distinct disadvantage when compared to the perceived elite players receiving elite instruction.
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