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Old 01-19-2010, 02:58 PM   #1
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Default The real MLK story

I post this not because I'm an elephant. I'm an independent. This is an important reminder to all Americans, but especially Black Americans of their political heritage that has been high jacked by a party that has worked steadfastly to "keep them down" for the better part of two centuries.

As I've said in one more than one thread, it is well beyond me why a Black American would vote for a donkey. That party's treatment of these Americans has been beyond disgraceful.

http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=16500
Why Martin Luther King Was Republican
by Frances Rice
08/16/2006

It should come as no surprise that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Republican. In that era, almost all black Americans were Republicans. Why? From its founding in 1854 as the anti-slavery party until today, the Republican Party has championed freedom and civil rights for blacks. And as one pundit so succinctly stated, the Democrat Party is as it always has been, the party of the four S's: slavery, secession, segregation and now socialism.

It was the Democrats who fought to keep blacks in slavery and passed the discriminatory Black Codes and Jim Crow laws. The Democrats started the Ku Klux Klan to lynch and terrorize blacks. The Democrats fought to prevent the passage of every civil rights law beginning with the civil rights laws of the 1860s, and continuing with the civil rights laws of the 1950s and 1960s.

During the civil rights era of the 1960s, Dr. King was fighting the Democrats who stood in the school house doors, turned skin-burning fire hoses on blacks and let loose vicious dogs. It was Republican President Dwight Eisenhower who pushed to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1957 and sent troops to Arkansas to desegregate schools. President Eisenhower also appointed Chief Justice Earl Warren to the U.S. Supreme Court, which resulted in the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision ending school segregation. Much is made of Democrat President Harry Truman's issuing an Executive Order in 1948 to desegregate the military. Not mentioned is the fact that it was Eisenhower who actually took action to effectively end segregation in the military.

Democrat President John F. Kennedy is lauded as a proponent of civil rights. However, Kennedy voted against the 1957 Civil Rights Act while he was a senator, as did Democrat Sen. Al Gore Sr. And after he became President, Kennedy was opposed to the 1963 March on Washington by Dr. King that was organized by A. Phillip Randolph, who was a black Republican. President Kennedy, through his brother Atty. Gen. Robert Kennedy, had Dr. King wiretapped and investigated by the FBI on suspicion of being a Communist in order to undermine Dr. King.

In March of 1968, while referring to Dr. King's leaving Memphis, Tenn., after riots broke out where a teenager was killed, Democrat Sen. Robert Byrd (W.Va.), a former member of the Ku Klux Klan, called Dr. King a "trouble-maker" who starts trouble, but runs like a coward after trouble is ignited. A few weeks later, Dr. King returned to Memphis and was assassinated on April 4, 1968.

Given the circumstances of that era, it is understandable why Dr. King was a Republican. It was the Republicans who fought to free blacks from slavery and amended the Constitution to grant blacks freedom (13th Amendment), citizenship (14th Amendment) and the right to vote (15th Amendment). Republicans passed the civil rights laws of the 1860s, including the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the Reconstruction Act of 1867 that was designed to establish a new government system in the Democrat-controlled South, one that was fair to blacks. Republicans also started the NAACP and affirmative action with Republican President Richard Nixon's 1969 Philadelphia Plan (crafted by black Republican Art Fletcher) that set the nation's fist goals and timetables. Although affirmative action now has been turned by the Democrats into an unfair quota system, affirmative action was begun by Nixon to counter the harm caused to blacks when Democrat President Woodrow Wilson in 1912 kicked all of the blacks out of federal government jobs.

Few black Americans know that it was Republicans who founded the Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Unknown also is the fact that Republican Sen. Everett Dirksen from Illinois was key to the passage of civil rights legislation in 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965. Not mentioned in recent media stories about extension of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is the fact that Dirksen wrote the language for the bill. Dirksen also crafted the language for the Civil Rights Act of 1968 which prohibited discrimination in housing. President Lyndon Johnson could not have achieved passage of civil rights legislation without the support of Republicans.

Critics of Republican Sen. Barry Goldwater, who ran for President against Johnson in 1964, ignore the fact that Goldwater wanted to force the Democrats in the South to stop passing discriminatory laws and thus end the need to continuously enact federal civil rights legislation.

Those who wrongly criticize Goldwater also ignore the fact that Johnson, in his 4,500 word State of the Union Address delivered on Jan. 4, 1965, mentioned scores of topics for federal action, but only 35 words were devoted to civil rights. He did not mention one word about voting rights. Then in 1967, showing his anger with Dr. King's protest against the Vietnam War, Johnson referred to Dr. King as "that ****** preacher."

Contrary to the false assertions by Democrats, the racist "Dixiecrats" did not all migrate to the Republican Party. "Dixiecrats" declared that they would rather vote for a "yellow dog" than vote for a Republican because the Republican Party was know as the party for blacks. Today, some of those "Dixiecrats" continue their political careers as Democrats, including Robert Byrd, who is well known for having been a "Kleagle" in the Ku Klux Klan.

Another former "Dixiecrat" is former Democrat Sen. Ernest Hollings, who put up the Confederate flag over the state Capitol when he was the governor of South Carolina. There was no public outcry when Democrat Sen. Christopher Dodd praised Byrd as someone who would have been "a great senator for any moment," including the Civil War. Yet Democrats denounced then-Senate GOP leader Trent Lott for his remarks about Sen. Strom Thurmond (R.-S.C.). Thurmond was never in the Ku Klux Klan and defended blacks against lynching and the discriminatory poll taxes imposed on blacks by Democrats. If Byrd and Thurmond were alive during the Civil War, and Byrd had his way, Thurmond would have been lynched.

The 30-year odyssey of the South switching to the Republican Party began in the 1970s with President Richard Nixon's "Southern Strategy," which was an effort on the part of Nixon to get Christians in the South to stop voting for Democrats who did not share their values and were still discriminating against their fellow Christians who happened to be black. Georgia did not switch until 2002, and some Southern states, including Louisiana, are still controlled by Democrats.

Today, Democrats, in pursuit of their socialist agenda, are fighting to keep blacks poor, angry and voting for Democrats. Examples of how egregiously Democrats act to keep blacks in poverty are numerous.

After wrongly convincing black Americans that a minimum wage increase was a good thing, the Democrats on August 3 kept their promise and killed the minimum wage bill passed by House Republicans on July 29. The blockage of the minimum wage bill was the second time in as many years that Democrats stuck a legislative finger in the eye of black Americans. Senate Democrats on April 1, 2004, blocked passage of a bill to renew the 1996 welfare reform law that was pushed by Republicans and vetoed twice by President Clinton before he finally signed it. Since the welfare reform law expired in September 2002, Congress had passed six extensions, and the latest expired on June 30, 2004. Opposed by the Democrats are school choice opportunity scholarships that would help black children get out of failing schools and Social Security reform, even though blacks on average lose $10,000 in the current system because of a shorter life expectancy than whites (72.2 years for blacks vs. 77.5 years for whites).

Democrats have been running our inner-cities for the past 30 to 40 years, and blacks are still complaining about the same problems. More than $7 trillion dollars have been spent on poverty programs since Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty with little, if any, impact on poverty. Diabolically, every election cycle, Democrats blame Republicans for the deplorable conditions in the inner-cities, then incite blacks to cast a protest vote against Republicans.

In order to break the Democrats' stranglehold on the black vote and free black Americans from the Democrat Party's economic plantation, we must shed the light of truth on the Democrats. We must demonstrate that the Democrat Party policies of socialism and dependency on government handouts offer the pathway to poverty, while Republican Party principles of hard work, personal responsibility, getting a good education and ownership of homes and small businesses offer the pathway to prosperity.


Ms. Rice is chairman of the National Black Republican Association (NBRA) and may be contacted at www.NBRA.info.
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Old 01-19-2010, 06:44 PM   #2
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Default Re: The real MLK story

False, insulting and another reminder of why it's so important to remember the past and get your info from more than one lopsided news source.

Fact: Martin Luther King Jr. never endorsed any political party.
Sorry - but there's no way he would endorse today's GOP.

Quote:
When a black conservative group ran a radio ad proclaiming that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was a Republican, reaction was swift. "We've gotten some e-mails and telephone calls filled with vitriol," said Frances Rice, chairman of the National Black Republican Association. "They've called me Aunt Jemima, a sellout, a traitor to my race."

In the battle for the black electorate, liberals, who make up the overwhelming majority of black voters, have long disagreed with conservatives over ideology, public policy and economic strategies to better the lives of African Americans. But when conservatives placed the civil rights movement in a Republican context, black liberals said, they crossed a line.

"To suggest that Martin could identify with a party that affirms preemptive, predatory war, and whose religious partners hint that God affirms war and favors the rich at the expense of the poor, is to revile Martin," said the Rev. Joseph Lowery, the former president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which the slain civil rights leader helped establish.

Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), who marched with King in the 1960s, called the ads an "insult to the legacy and the memory of Martin Luther King Jr." and "an affront to all that he stood for."


The spot, which ran for a time in the District, Georgia, Maryland, Ohio and Pennsylvania, will soon run again in those areas, as well as in Miami, Orlando and Tampa, Rice said.

The debate surrounding the ad is the latest skirmish in the ongoing battle over the King legacy. Foes of affirmative action, for example, often cite a line from King's "I Have a Dream" speech in 1963 in which he prayed that his children would not be judged by the color of their skin but by the "content of their character," an adoption that makes black liberals fume. But in the latest fight, civil rights veterans may be surprised to find that some black conservatives agree with them.

Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael Steele (R), who is running for the U.S. Senate, denounced the King ad, and Donald E. Scoggins, president of Republicans for Black Empowerment and a former member of the association, said it was a terrible idea.

Black Republicans railed against the radio ads, with the sharpest criticism coming from former members of the black Republican association.

"The vast majority of black Republicans I know would not have approved of the ad," Scoggins said.

In the ad, a black woman says, "Dr. King was a real man," and a second one responds, "You know he was a Republican."

"Dr. King, a Republican?"

The women go on to say that Democrats started the Ku Klux Klan, lumping together those in the South with others in the North who reached out to African Americans with New Deal programs and by desegregating the armed forces.

The backlash was so fierce that Rice stopped answering telephone calls. "We anticipated some controversy, but my goodness, we struck a nerve," she said in an interview from Sarasota, Fla.

"I absolutely do not regret the ads," said Rice, 62, a native of Atlanta, King's hometown. He "absolutely was a Republican," she insisted. "We were all Republicans in those days. The Democrats were training fire hoses on us, siccing dogs on us."

It is true that Southern Democrats, many of whom called themselves "Dixiecrats," blocked the social and political progress of black Southerners for decades. Among them was Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.), a former local leader in the Ku Klux Klan. Byrd has said he regrets his affiliation.

In 1960, King was arrested for trespassing during a sit-in and held in Georgia's Reidsville prison. Fearing for his son's life, Martin Luther King Sr. appealed to presidential candidate John F. Kennedy to secure his release.

When King was freed, his father vowed to deliver 10 million votes to the Democrat, even though Kennedy was only a reluctant supporter of civil rights. That began four decades of black people voting for liberals.

The younger King voted for Kennedy, and for Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson four years later. In that election, King publicly denounced the Republican candidate, Barry Goldwater.

Today, the vast majority of black voters are Democrats, including former ambassador to the United Nations Andrew Young and former presidential hopeful Jesse L. Jackson, two former King aides.

That is why the ad was "a joke," said Christopher Arps, a former spokesman for Rice and the association. "Anyone with any sense knows that most black people were Republican at one time. But it's a far stretch to think that in the '60s Martin Luther King was a Republican."

Arps and Scoggins resigned from the association board last year when they disagreed with Rice on a separate issue. She wanted to support President Bush when he came under fire for his administration's slow response to Hurricane Katrina.

"In terms of what we're trying to do, encourage more blacks to look at the Republican Party, I didn't think we could do that in an in-your-face-type way," Scoggins said. "There were bodies floating in the street."

In addition to Scoggins and Arps, at least four other members resigned. Rice questioned their fortitude. The group was founded so that black conservatives could assert themselves, she said, and "when it came time to do something, some stepped back."

"It was a 'my way or the highway' sort of thing," Scoggins said. "I was crushed when this thing happened because it turned out to be completely the opposite of what I thought it would be."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...101801754.html
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Old 01-19-2010, 07:05 PM   #3
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Default Re: The real MLK story

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leftoverhard View Post
False, insulting and another reminder of why it's so important to remember the past and get your info from more than one lopsided news source.
False? Prove your point. Sources. Links.

It is. I lived through that history. You read about it.

This didn't come from a "lopsided news source". It was written by Frances Rice, then chairman of the National Black Republican Association. I believe she is qualified to comment.

If your team's history is insulting, improve your team.

Your team's history is racist and bloody. They've obstructed the rise of the Black man at every turn. Nowhere to hide. Its all "on tape".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leftoverhard View Post
Fact: Martin Luther King Jr. never endorsed any political party.
Sorry - but there's no way he would endorse today's GOP.
Links. Sources. Not blather.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leftoverhard View Post
Lopsided? Indeed. You might as well quote pravda.

I've asked this of many a donkey. Why should Black Americans vote for donkeys.

Heres a clue...

Because...

1.

2.

3.

....
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Old 01-19-2010, 08:26 PM   #4
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Default Re: The real MLK story

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent View Post
I post this not because I'm an elephant. I'm an independent. This is an important reminder to all Americans, but especially Black Americans of their political heritage that has been high jacked by a party that has worked steadfastly to "keep them down" for the better part of two centuries.

As I've said in one more than one thread, it is well beyond me why a Black American would vote for a donkey. That party's treatment of these Americans has been beyond disgraceful.

]
perhaps your beloved ronald reagan had something to do with it..

Quote:
Reagan and Race: “He Maintained A System Of Rich And Poor, A System Of Black And White”
Raceecon5

We take a look at Reagan’s policies on race and civil rights with the Rev. Graylan Hagler, discussing the former president’s assault on affirmative actions and social welfare programs and the rise of the crack epidemic in African American communities. [Includes transcript]





Throughout the week on Democracy Now!, we have reported extensively on the Record of Ronald Reagan during his 8 years in office. From Iran-Contra, to the bloody US-fuelled conflicts in Central America, to his administration’s arming of both Iran and Iraq, to his invasion of Grenada and the nuclear arms race. Our series is called “Remembering the Dead.” Later in the program, we will take a close look at Reagan’s policy toward apartheid South Africa.

But first, we are going to shift gears and take a close look at Reagan’s policies at home, here in the US. Among Reagan’s achievements that you won’t hear about from most of the pundits is that Reagan was the first president to turn the US into a debtor nation, nearly tripling the nation’s debt in his 8 years in office. He was also the first president since the Great Depression to see unemployment hit more than 10%. Reagan cracked down on organized labor and America’s homeless population grew to over 2 million people. On the issue of race, the most cited moment of the Reagan presidency during the past week was that he signed legislation for a national holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. But this is hardly representative of Reagan’s policies on race and civil rights.

Ronald Reagan launched his campaign for the presidency in Philadelphia, Mississippi. That is the place now infamous from the civil rights movement. It was where three civil rights workers were murdered in one of the most well-known cases of racist violence from the 60s. During his first run for office, Reagan proudly waved his Dixiecrat credentials, saying: “I believe in states’ rights and I believe in people doing as much as they can for themselves at the community level and at the private level.”

After taking office in 1981, Reagan began a sustained attack on the government’s civil rights apparatus, opened an assault on affirmative action and social welfare programs, embraced the White racist leaders of then-apartheid South Africa and waged war on the tiny, Black Caribbean nation of Grenada. During his presidency, Reagan fired members of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights who criticized his civil rights policies, including his strong opposition to affirmative action programs. One of the commissioners recalls that the judge who overturned the dismissal did so because “you can’t fire a watchdog for biting.” Reagan also attempted to limit and gut the Voting Rights Act and he slashed important programs like the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act that provided assistance to many African Americans.

* Rev. Graylan Hagler, president of Ministers for Racial, Social and Economic Justice.

AMY GOODMAN: Can you talk today about President Reagan’s record during the 1980s?

REV. GRAYLAN HAGLER: Oh yes, I mean, one of the things that’s very very interesting and alarming to me is that the country and the commercial media particularly seems to be remembering a Ronald Reagan that did not exist for those of us who are Black and other people of color and women because they speak about him, as if he was a saint, when the reality is that everything he represented was the old historical white racist ideology of this nation . I mean the fact that the campaign wasn’t even started in Philadelphia, Mississippi. The reality that this was a attack s upon Affirmative Action and the dismantling really of social programs the closing of hospitals and programs that put people out on the streets that we still live with the homeless population that was started then. I mean all of those types of issues are very alarming and obviously we are seeing a very mythologized image of Reagan currently.

AMY GOODMAN: Can you talk specifically about the Reagan years as they relate to Affirmative Action?

REV. GRAYLAN HAGLER: Well, I mean obviously yes may I think that, one is that we continue to see a really orchestrated attack . The framing of Affirmative Action as somehow reverse discrimination, as they kept using that or, and the reality is, that was not the reality and it continues to stalk as an attack upon Black people upon other people of color, upon women a resistance of that even when we talk about the signing of the legislation for the Martin Luther King holiday, that was not done with open arms by Reagan and his administration; in fact he referred to it as signing it because of all this hoopla that was created and that was by grassroots communities and Black leadership that pushed it, so there was not an open arm policy towards anything that really represented the bulk of us.

AMY GOODMAN: Rev. Hagler as we continue our series “Remembering the Dead”, can you talk about the 1980’s in terms of drugs in this country?

REV. GRAYLAN HAGLER: Oh yeah, one of the things is the communities really got hit with the drug epidemic, really the crack epidemic. There were stories circulating for years, that this was one way the Contras were funded and Central America was basically, through the funneling of drugs, to the black communities but one thing is really sure, the crack epidemic grew and expanded and virtually devastated a generation and subsequent generation and greatly impoverished the communities even more so that is also whether how we look at it that is the manifestation of the Reagan Administration and it is a story of two societies and a story of two worlds. One world, obviously the commercial media is talking about, is a white world that the white world is in charge but the other side of the story, one that is not being talked about is the devastatation that has been heaped upon people of color, poor people, women and their children in the society.



AMY GOODMAN: Reverend Hagler, as you listen to this conversation, you’re also based in Washington, where the state funeral is taking place today, of Ronald Reagan. Can you share your final thoughts?

REV. GRAYLAN HAGLER: Well, I mean, one of the things is that—I mean, I just was listening to all of the comments and the comments are extremely important for us to just simply remember that what we are seeing and hearing is not real, but we’re still paying the costs of this administration. We’re still having to deal with what was started, sort of a very anti-labor movement. A backlash to the movements that moved people in a sense from the back of the bus to hopes to have a place in the society. We’re still suffering from the backlash of that economic restructuring that took place under the administration that is simply made the wealthier even that much more wealthy. To a obscene level, and made the working class and the poor poorer and dispossessed us of a place to live, a dignity and respect. You know, just continual attacks that are carried out right now through this day. What we’re also really witnessing is in a sense right now and what happened when Reagan was elected was that the old guard who felt that they had lost power in this country by having to open up their arms and include a very diverse constituency, and at least give that very diverse constituency hope and a sense of possibility. When Reagan was elected, it was a real establishment of that old guard being back in charge. And the message was clear. Not only domestically, but around the world, that it’s time to get back to the back of the bus. There is a new driver in charge, and that driver is the old historical driver that basically maintained a system of rich and poor. A system of black and white.
http://www.democracynow.org/2004/6/1...e_maintained_a


Quote:
Reagan opposed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, opposed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (calling it "humiliating to the South"), and ran for governor of California in 1966 promising to wipe the Fair Housing Act off the books. "If an individual wants to discriminate against Negroes or others in selling or renting his house," he said, "he has a right to do so." After the Republican convention in 1980, Reagan travelled to the county fair in Neshoba, Mississippi, where, in 1964, three Freedom Riders had been slain by the Ku Klux Klan. Before an all-white crowd of tens of thousands, Reagan declared: "I believe in states' rights".

As president, Reagan aligned his justice department on the side of segregation, supporting the fundamentalist Bob Jones University in its case seeking federal funds for institutions that discriminate on the basis of race. In 1983, when the supreme court decided against Bob Jones, Reagan, under fire from his right in the aftermath, gutted the Civil Rights Commission.
and ummmm wasn't david duke a republican ?
yup...the GOP has always been a champion for minorities...

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Old 01-19-2010, 08:46 PM   #5
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Default Re: The real MLK story

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leftoverhard View Post
False, insulting and another reminder of why it's so important to remember the past and get your info from more than one lopsided news source.

Fact: Martin Luther King Jr. never endorsed any political party.
Sorry - but there's no way he would endorse today's GOP.



http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...101801754.html

oops...wrong quote
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Old 01-19-2010, 09:36 PM   #6
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Default Re: The real MLK story

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Originally Posted by Vincent View Post
I believe she is qualified to comment.
Oh, because she's a black republican? Interesting.


Quote:
Your team's history is racist and bloody. They've obstructed the rise of the Black man at every turn. Nowhere to hide. Its all "on tape".
Vincent - even more interesting is how all of the sudden you're a man for the people, a freedom fighter - and at an even more base level - someone who suddenly believes racism exists after debating it here on this forum.
Vincent - remember saying this? MLK would be proud.
Quote:
Sides, he's half @#$%ing arab.
Quote:
This calling people "racist" is getting beyond ridiculous.
This isn't even worthy of an argument - but I will continue to offer the truth as an alternative to your many extreme-fringe-right-wing-conspiracy-propaganda that you constantly post as fact here.
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Old 01-20-2010, 12:02 AM   #7
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Default Re: The real MLK story

Yes, I'm sure MLK would have been very proud of the "he's a terrorist! Kill him!" and the "he's a black, Marxist, socialist, terrorist Muslim" crowd.

And he would have been especially proud of the great McCain campaign volunteer Ashley Todd.

"I was attacked by an invisible 6'4" black male that carved this backwards B on my face."

Her attempt to pander to far right racist wing of the GOP. I'm sure she made them very proud.

Very interesting how an "Independent" is pushing blacks so hard to vote Republican and giving all sorts of reasons why they should. One would think an "Independent" would push them to vote Independent or third party. Very telling.

What's more telling is how blacks are specifically pointed out in this argument. Instead of asking why "anyone" would vote for the donkeys as you say, the argument specifically targets blacks.

I'm sure blacks are just jumping at the bit to vote for the Trent Lott, Rush Limbaugh (you know, Donovan McNabb is only where he is because he's black), Sean Hannity GOP.

When they look at this party and see a "dominant demographic", I guess they must ask themselves: where exactly do I fit in? I mean, I may be for low taxes, less government spending, strong military, blah, blah, blah, but when I look around, I don't see too many that look like me. Not many Asians, Latinos, God-forbid a Muslim (GOP just love them).

Well, I guess they could look to the "we're going after everyone, including one-armed midgets" man Michael Steele. Of course, that didn't fool anyone. Since the Dems have Obama, we'll select a black man to head up the GOP to show the black community "see? we can elect someone black too".

People may not be going crazy over Democrats, but they certainly aren't running to the GOP. The real true conservatives are so fed up until they're looking to their "Tea Party" for a leader (the same tea party that waited until Jan. 2009 to whine about government spending, but had nothing to say for 8 years.) I may not agree with you, but I do respect you Ron Paul, even if your own party does throw you under the bus.

"Vincent - even more interesting is how all of the sudden you're a man for the people, a freedom fighter - and at an even more base level - someone who suddenly believes racism exists after debating it here on this forum.
Vincent - remember saying this? MLK would be proud."



That was great!

I almost bust a gut at another thread on here that was calling out Harry Reid for a comment he made about Obama. And all I could think of was "hi kettle. Meet pot."

Anytime the far right wing of the GOP calls out someone ELSE for racial comments, it makes for great comedy. This comes to another GOP tactic: the old "do as I say and not as I do" philosophy.

You preach the Bible and God and shove it down everyone's throats, you harp on family values and all that.......................then go out and cheat on your spouses...............and blame the "liberal media" for it. Yes, Mr. David Vitter, Mr. Larry Craig, Mr. Mark Foley. The liberal media was the cause you did it. lol Hey, cheat on your wife, engage in all those type of activities, but it's a bit hypocritical to preach it to someone else and then turn around and do it yourself.

The Dems are holding down blacks. Yes, and the GOP is very accepting of blacks and other minorities, aren't they? lol Oh, and MLK supported, not one, but two Democrats, JFK and LBJ, one of which civil rights passed under.

But you're right. I'm sure MLK is looking down on the far right wing of the GOP and smiling because he is so proud. The GOP's percentage of minorities has increased from, what, 5 to an astounding 6% over the past few years? lol I'm sure they would have no problem listening to the Ron Paul types, but the GOP as a whole? Not on your best day. Keep the Limbaughs and Hannitys and Savages and we'll see how far your message resonates in the black/minority community.

Oh, and since the Dems are accused of being out to separate people and create division, why isn't the "National Black Republican Association" simply called Republicans? Why do they have to separated from the rest of the GOP by calling them Black Republicans? I thought everyone in the GOP were equals! Certainly we're not going back to the Jim Crow era.
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Old 01-20-2010, 05:47 AM   #8
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Default Re: The real MLK story

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent View Post
Why do people think its necessary to precede comments about bho or mich with "please don't pan me as a racist" disclaimers? There is sufficient racist rhetoric in their "bodies of work", and from those they associate with, that no apologies are required. Weapons free.

Sides, he's half @#$%ing arab.
If you’re going to quote, quote in context. The points made there were clear. The choice of expression in the last statement was regrettable. I apologized publicly and privately and removed it from the post.

http://forums.steelersfever.com/show...1&postcount=33

The point of this thread is not about bho, his ethnicity, or who is or is not a racist. It is very simply that MLK was a Republican. Apparently that’s a difficult reality to swallow.

History, while it has been vigorously rewritten over the last 50 years, holds that one party was indeed founded in large part to end slavery. The other fought for slavery, and opposed every civil rights measure for a century until they were forced to acquiesce in the 60s. Its all “on tape”. Caint hide from it.

Here’s a fun little history quiz brought to you by those wascawy bwack people over at the wepwubwican party…

http://www.nbra.info/index.cfm?fusea...YK-HistoryTest

BLACK POLITICAL HISTORY: THE UNTOLD STORY

1. What Party was founded as the anti-slavery Party and fought to free blacks from slavery?
[ ] a. Democratic Party
[ ] b. Republican Party

2. What was the Party of Abraham Lincoln who signed the emancipation proclamation that resulted in the Juneteenth celebrations that occur in black communities today?
[ ] a. Democratic Party
[ ] b. Republican Party

3. What Party passed the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the U. S. Constitution granting blacks freedom, citizenship, and the right to vote?
[ ] a. Democratic Party
[ ] b. Republican Party

4. What Party passed the Civil Rights Acts of 1866 and 1875 granting blacks protection from the Black Codes and prohibiting racial discrimination in public accommodations, and was the Party of most blacks prior to the 1960’s, including Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Booker T. Washington, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.?
[ ] a. Democratic Party
[ ] b. Republican Party

5. What was the Party of the founding fathers of the NAACP who were themselves white?
[ ] a. Democratic Party
[ ] b. Republican Party

http://hiphoprepublican.com/feature/...al-convention/

6. What was the Party of President Dwight Eisenhower who sent U.S. troops to Arkansas to desegregate schools, established the Civil Rights Commission in 1958, and appointed Chief Justice Earl Warren to the U.S. Supreme Court which resulted in the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision ending school segregation?
[ ] a. Democratic Party
[ ] b. Republican Party

7. What Party, by the greatest percentage, passed the1957 Civil Rights Act and the Civil Rights Acts of the 1960’s?
[ ] a. Democratic Party
[ ] b. Republican Party

8. What was the Party of President Richard Nixon who instituted the first Affirmative Action program in 1969 with the Philadelphia Plan that established goals and timetables?
[ ] a. Democratic Party
[ ] b. Republican Party

9. What is the Party of President George W. Bush who supports the U.S. Supreme Court’s University of Michigan Affirmative Action decision, and is spending over $200 billion to fight AIDS in Africa and on programs to help black Americans prosper, including school vouchers, the faith-based initiative, home ownership, and small business ownership?
[ ] a. Democratic Party
[ ] b. Republican Party

10. What Party fought to keep blacks in slavery and was the Party of the Ku Klux Klan?
[ ] a. Republican Party
[ ] b. Democratic Party

11. What Party from 1870 to 1930 used fraud, whippings, lynching, murder, intimidation, and mutilation to get the black vote, and passed the Black Codes and Jim Crow laws which legalized racial discrimination and denied blacks their rights as citizens?
[ ] a. Republican Party
[ ] b. Democratic Party

12. What was the Party of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and President Harry Truman who rejected anti-lynching laws and efforts to establish a permanent Civil Rights Commission?
[ ] a. Republican Party
[ ] b. Democratic Party

13. What was the Party of President John F. Kennedy who voted against the 1957 Civil Rights law as a Senator, then opposed the 1963 March on Washington by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. after becoming president, and later had the FBI (supervised by his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy) investigate Dr. King on suspicion of being a communist?
[ ] a. Republican Party
[ ] b. Democratic Party

14. What is the Party of current Senator Robert Byrd who was a member of the Ku Klux Klan, Senator Fritz Hollings who hoisted the Confederate flag over the state capitol in South Carolina when he was the governor, and Senator Ted Kennedy who recently insulted black judicial nominees by calling them “Neanderthals” while blocking their appointments?
[ ] a. Republican Party
[ ] b. Democratic Party

If you answered "B" to each, you are correct.

And I'll ask again, why would a black person vote for a donkey?
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Old 01-20-2010, 09:47 AM   #9
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Default Re: The real MLK story

You know, I have heard about this many times over the years, and being the skeptic that I am, I'm just not going to buy it hook, line and sinker. It doesn't matter to me who did what, the fact is that both parties have a checkered past when it comes to racism. I'm also not ready to just jump on board with the notion that MLK was a Republican. In all of the studying I've done, I've never read it anywhere that he himself declared that he was a Republican - in fact, he repeatedly stated that he didn't have any political affiliation, that he wanted equal rights for blacks and for this to be a "color-blind" society.

That aside, I'm not exactly thrilled with the idea that over 90% of black people vote for one party in every election. That is insane to me. I've always prided myself on having an open mind, and I am not going to just vote Democrat because everyone else does. It's especially baffling when you consider that many blacks (many more than you'd think) live traditional conservative lives and have conservative ideas...but just can't bring themselves to either vote for Republicans or become one themselves for a variety of reasons. I fit into the latter camp (becoming one - I have voted for Republicans in the past). I hope that changes in the future, but it's going to take the right kind of Republican to do it, one who a center-right rather than a far-right conservative, because when you get past all of the rhetoric, they really do have a good general message. I don't think anyone disagrees with having faith, loving your country, working hard to become successful and taking control of your own life, rather than relying on someone else (the government) to take care of you.
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Old 01-20-2010, 11:16 AM   #10
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Default Re: The real MLK story

http://hiphoprepublican.com/politics...-a-republican/
WAS DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. A REPUBLICAN?
By HHR | July 27th, 2009 | Category: Featured, HHR Contributors, Urban Issues |
by Cleo Brown

One of the most outstanding African-Americans to emerge from the Republican Party was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. King was the slain Civil Right’s Leader whose movement changed the manner in which Americans perceived and treated African-Americans in the United States. Born in Atlanta, Georgia on January 15th, 1926 in his family’s home, Dr. King descended from a Grandfather and a Father who were both Baptist Ministers in Georgia.

Dr. King, himself, was educated at Morehouse College(1948), Crozer Theological Seminary(1951). And at Boston University. He received his Ph.D. Degree from Boston University in 1955 at the age of twenty-nine. Although King’s Grandfather had been a Georgia Preacher, and his father had been a Minister at Ebeneezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, Dr. King, who was ordained in 1947, became a minister in 1954 in Montgomery, Alabama.

Consequently, he was close by when Rosa Parks was arrested in 1955 for refusing to give up her seat on Montgomery, Alabama’s segregated bus lines. From 1955 to 1956, therefore, he led the boycott of the Montgomery, Alabama bus company crippling not only the bus company but also the routine of life for Montgomery, Alabama’s Caucasian Citizens. King was also the organizer and the leader of The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) which he used to recruit people to promote a Civil Right’s Movement based upon the use of non-violent, passive resistance as a tactic through which to counter racist oppression directed against people of color, but particularly the peoples in the United States descended from Africa.

In addition to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, King also conducted campaigns against racist injustice in places such as Birmingham, Alabama; Albany, New York; and Washington, D.C. His march on Washington D.C. in 1963 was on behalf of the acquisition of Civil Rights Policy, but especially he sought National Voting Rights for African-Americans in The United States. This is also where he delivered his Historic “I Have a Dream” Speech. In 1964 he won The Nobel Peace Prize although he refused the $50,000.00 purse associated with the prize for himself and for his family preferring to donate the money to the SCLC.

By 1966 he had become involved in a Poor People’s Campaign in Chicago, Illinois in which he sought Welfare Benefits for the poor. He was assassinated on April 4th, 1968 at The Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee where he had participated in demonstrations on behalf of “striking sanitation workers.”

Historically, the perpetrators and the promoters of racism and racist policy in the United States have been Southern Democrats. According to Alveda C. King, who is the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Dr. King, therefore, did not align himself with The Democratic Party for Southern Democrats were the individuals with attack dogs; cattle prods; and lynch ropes denying African-Americans their rights as they enforced the segregationist policies of Jim Crow.

Compounding this fact is also a King Family History of Republican Party Membership in which Martin King’s Father and his Grandfather as well as his brother were all Republican Party Members. Indeed, also historically, voting trends among African-Americans indicate that they overwhelmingly voted for candidates from The Republican Party because The Republican Party was known as the party of Abraham Lincoln. This trend continued until 1932 with the election and the ascension of Franklin Delano Roosevelt to the office of President of The United States.


And, although, voting trends among African-Americans did begin to change throughout The Presidential Administration of Franklin Roosevelt, those Southern Blacks who could vote continued to vote for candidates from The Republican Party due to the degree to which Southern Democrats perpetrated racism and promoted segregation throughout The United States but particularly in the South.

Consequently, Dr. King registered as a Republican voter in 1956. He did not give his support to the Democratic Presidential Contender, named John F. Kennedy, until 1960 despite Kennedy’s failure to vote for Civil Right’s Policy in 1957.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his support to Kennedy because, as a Senator, Kennedy had telephoned a pregnant Coretta Scott King while her husband’s life hung in the balance in a Birmingham, Alabama jail.

Kennedy making sure that there was media coverage of the event causing Martin Luther King Sr. and around 100,000 African-Americans to also give their support to Senator Kennedy for President. Consequently, The Kennedy and The Johnson Administrations supported, created, enacted, and upheld Civil Right’s Legislation and Policy further increasing the numbers of African-Americans who decided to vote as Democrats.

Today, therefore, most African-American voters are perceived of as Democrats. Previously, however, The Republican Party had the Black Vote securely in its “pocket” for many years with Martin Luther King Jr. being one of its party’s members.

Cleo E. Brown is a moderate Republican an educator on staff in New York City, New York. She is also a free lance writer and an Editor at HHR Blog. She holds a Master’s Degree in Contemporary African-American History from The University of California at Davis and has done work on a Ph.D. in Education at The University of San Francisco in San Francisco, California.

HHR NOTE: It would seem that King because of his opposition to the Vietnam War became more of a political independent. While Lyndon Johnson supported the civil rights bill, he also sent many black men to war in Vietnam. King did not support the Democrat president for taking this nation to war. On average it would seem that for most of his life he was a Republican, as his father was. He became disenchanted with both political parties it seems overtime. Just because he voted for and supported Kennedy did not necessarily make him a Democrat.
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