Why register with the Steelers Fever Forums?
 • Intelligent and friendly discussions.
 • It's free and it's quick. Always.
 • Enter events in the forums calendar.
 • Very user friendly software.
 • Exclusive contests and giveaways.

 Donate to Steelers Fever, Click here
 Our 2013 Goal: $400.00 - To Date: $00.00 (00.00%)
 Home | Forums | Editorials | Shop | Tickets | Downloads | Contact Pittsburgh Steelers Forum Feed Not Just Fans. Hardcore Fans.

Go Back   Steelers Fever Forums > Miscellaneous > Locker Room


Steelers Fever Fan Shop

Doc's Sports Get FREE NFL Picks and College Football picks as well as Football Lines like live NFL Lines and updated NFL Power Rankings all at Doc's Sports Service.

Steelers Steelers - Giants Giants
August 9th, 2014, 7:30pmET

CBS
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-26-2013, 07:30 PM   #1
Vis
In Hoc
Supporter
 
Vis's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 7,251
Gender: Male
Member Number: 5117
Thanks: 538
Thanked 4,159 Times in 2,140 Posts
My Mood: Innocent
Default Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

Mark Carson was shot in the face because he's gay.

His alleged killer, 33-year old Elliot Morales, is said to have confronted Carson, 32, and a companion, in New York's Greenwich Village last Friday night, yelling antigay slurs. When Carson walked away, Morales reportedly followed and shot him. Morales was arrested by police after a foot chase.

In pondering this tragedy, it is worthwhile to consider a couple things: where it happened, and when.

The "where" is just a few blocks from the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar where a 1969 police raid ("act of ongoing police harassment," would probably be the more accurate description) led to a violent uprising. It is regarded as the birthplace of the modern gay rights movement.

The "when" is now, in the post-Jason Collins era.

He is, you will recall, the 34-year-old NBA journeyman who made history a few weeks ago when he became the first active player in one of the big four professional sports to come out as gay. While most of us were applauding, a few of us affected to treat the event with a collective shrug, sought to minimize it by pretending it was unimportant.

"Who cares?" wrote conservative blogger Crystal Wright.

"It means less than nothing to me," said Mike Francesca, a New York radio host.

"I do not care about Mr. Collins' sexuality," wrote columnist Armstrong Williams.

Methinks they doth protest too much.

Why does this matter?

Yours truly attempted to answer that question in this space when Collins came out. Sadly, Mark Carson provides a more viscerally convincing answer in the fact and manner of his dying.

Here's the thing: as gay rights have become more approved and inevitable, it becomes less socially acceptable to oppose them as loudly and brazenly as some of us once did. As recently as 2001, for example, Williams was arguing that gay couples were unfit to adopt.

Such arguments largely lost, he and others like him turn now to this new pose of ostentatious indifference that says in effect, "Fine." Be gay if you must, but why do you feel you have to announce your sexuality to the world?

It is an argument with the unfortunate advantage of seeming to make sense, even as it paints gay people as overly provocative and needlessly demonstrative. Don't put your sexual orientation in my face, it says, and I won't put mine in yours. Keep your sex life private. Don't ask, don't tell.

But the flaw in the argument is obvious: straight people announce their sexuality all day everyday. It happens when they canoodle in the park, walk hand in hand through the mall, place loved ones' pictures on the desk. These are small joys and we don't think of them as announcements of sexuality, but they are.

If you are gay, you don't do such things. Or, you do them strategically, thoughtfully, picking and choosing where and when it is safe to canoodle, hold hands, set out the pictures .?.?. be. Because you realize the reaction may not just be derision, but violence. Even death.

So the decision to seize these small joys demands courage. This is what is provided when a Jason Collins announces himself. Or when an Ellen DeGeneres, a Zachary Quinto, a Neil Patrick Harris, a Jenna Wolf, an Anderson Cooper, a Ricky Martin or a Wanda Sykes does the same.

Sometimes, when you step out on the ice, it helps to know someone else has already tested it. If you are going to demand the right to be, if you are going to accept the risk that doing so entails, it's good to know that at least you're not alone.

Why does this matter? they ask.

Well, in 2013, in America's biggest city, within steps of a gay rights landmark, it seems you can still be shot in the face for no other reason than that you are gay.

That's why.

Leonard Pitts, Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132; lpitts@herald.com.


Read more here: http://www.ledger-enquirer.com/2013/...#storylink=cpy
__________________


All generalizations are dangerous.
Vis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 07:30 PM   #2
Vis
In Hoc
Supporter
 
Vis's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 7,251
Gender: Male
Member Number: 5117
Thanks: 538
Thanked 4,159 Times in 2,140 Posts
My Mood: Innocent
Default Re: Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

I posted this in a new thread because it's a new thread. No baggage from any other, I hope.
__________________


All generalizations are dangerous.
Vis is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Vis For This Useful Post:
MACH1 (05-26-2013)
Old 05-26-2013, 07:35 PM   #3
Vis
In Hoc
Supporter
 
Vis's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 7,251
Gender: Male
Member Number: 5117
Thanks: 538
Thanked 4,159 Times in 2,140 Posts
My Mood: Innocent
Default Re: Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

The NY Times describes the victim:

Mr. Carson, who was 32, had recently moved to Brooklyn from Harlem after scrimping and saving money from his job at a yogurt shop in Midtown, according to Kay Allen, a friend for more than a decade.

“He was a proud gay man,” Ms. Allen said. “A fabulous gay man.” She noted that he loved going to the Village. “His spirit was too big for this city,” she said. “He didn’t have a negative bone in his body.”

Carson's father was interviewed by The NY Post:

“I thought that kind of hate stuff was gone, but I see that it’s not,” the victim’s distraught father, Mark Carson Sr., told The Post. “It’s simply ridiculous. People are what people are. They do what they do. You can’t knock down who people are.”

CBS2 reports that the suspect was uncooperative after his arrest, shortly after the shooting:

Elliot Morales, 33, was charged with Second Degree Murder As A Hate Crime, as well as Criminal Possession Of A Weapon on Saturday. Morales had been in custody but refused to give his name. He was eventually identified by police using facial recognition technology.

Police are still searching for two people who were with Morales' just before and during the shooting. Also, police officials reiterated that the killing was indeed sparked by hate:
“This fully looks to be a hate crime; a bias crime,” Commissioner Kelly said. “There were no words that would aggravate the situation that were spoken by the victims. They did not know the confronter. There was no previous relationship.”

Carson's murder is the latest in a concernig spike of anti-gay crimes in the city:

Mr. Kelly said there had been a rise in bias-related crimes in New York City this year — 22 compared with 13 during the same period last year. In just the past three weeks, there have been five attacks directed at gay men, including a vicious assault on a gay couple outside Madison Square Garden on May 5.

Timothy Lunceford, 56, who has lived in the West Village for 35 years, said he believed the killing was a brazen display of a kind of intolerance he had not known in New York for decades. “It’s outrageous,” he said. “They say we’ve worked through homophobia, but it’s not gone away. It’s just not usually as out there in the open like it was this morning.”



Read more: http://www.towleroad.com/2013/05/vig...#ixzz2URt7RpXS
__________________


All generalizations are dangerous.
Vis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 07:36 PM   #4
Bayz101
Renegade
Supporter
 
Bayz101's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mansfield, Ohio
Posts: 7,693
Gender: Male
Member Number: 18856
Thanks: 1,237
Thanked 3,505 Times in 1,580 Posts
My Mood: Tired
Default Re: Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

That's one of many reasons (or no reason, really) that you could be shot here in America. It's sad, but it's true. We're not perfect, and anyone who says we are is blind. It's sickening some of the shit that happens in this country, and even more sickening some of the shit that happens elsewhere. I truly believe gay marriage and marriage equality will be legal in the country, but that won't change the fact that there's some people fucked up in the head living in this country. People that will kill you because of your accent, the color of your skin or even your sexual preference. Anyone who is okay with the brutal, evil things that happen in this country every day simply isn't human in my eyes.
__________________


"Either you're playing dumb, or it's not an act". -Judge Judy

No need to drive me crazy. I can walk from here.
Bayz101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 07:38 PM   #5
Vis
In Hoc
Supporter
 
Vis's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 7,251
Gender: Male
Member Number: 5117
Thanks: 538
Thanked 4,159 Times in 2,140 Posts
My Mood: Innocent
Default Re: Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

NEW YORK (WABC) -- Two men are under arrest, while three other suspects are still being sought in an attack on two gay men in Manhattan.

The brutal beating occurred Friday near PATH's 33rd Street station in Manhattan.
Police are working to see if there is any link between this incident and one that occurred near Madison Square Garden on Sunday.
Police say the two victims were denied access to an after-hours billiards club. They were then approached by a group of men who allegedly shouted gay slurs and beat the men, according to police.

The alleged attack continued after the victims tried to escape and ended up across the street near the 33rd street PATH station.

Two suspects were arrested as others got away on foot. The suspects were identified as Asllan Berisha, 21, and Brian Ramirez, 21, both of New York City.

The men were charged with the hate crimes of felony assault and are being processed by the Port Authority Police.

Both victims suffered severe facial injuries and were treated at Belleview Hospital. One of the victims underwent eye surgery as a result of the beating.
__________________


All generalizations are dangerous.
Vis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 07:44 PM   #6
Vis
In Hoc
Supporter
 
Vis's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 7,251
Gender: Male
Member Number: 5117
Thanks: 538
Thanked 4,159 Times in 2,140 Posts
My Mood: Innocent
Default Re: Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

Equality's Brutal Backlash: The Murder of Mark Carson and the Rise in Violence Against Gays

A few months ago, I wrote about how my partner and I were called "disgusting" by a man on the street as we shared a quick goodbye kiss in the middle of the afternoon in the very gay Manhattan neighborhood of Chelsea. That has turned out to be less an aberration than a symptom of far more horrific things to come. We've seen reports of violent attack after violent attack in New York against gays in recent weeks, and now, this past weekend, we've experienced the brutal killing of 32-year-old Mark Carson in an alleged anti-gay shooting in Greenwich Village.

"You want to die tonight?" the alleged gunman reportedly said after repeatedly calling Carson and a male companion "******s" while they were walking down the street, before fatally shooting Carson in the face.

This killing has kept me up the past two nights. It's sickening and enraging. And perhaps the shock I'm seeing expressed about it, particularly among younger LGBT people, underscores that many of us have been living with a false sense of security, intoxicated by the wins on marriage equality in the states and in the federal courts. It's way too easy to grow complacent, fed by the desire to have the fight done with as well as by the seductive message of some in the media who've simplistically declared victory for the LGBT rights movement.

Victory is very far off, however, if we can't walk the streets of even the most LGBT-friendly cities holding hands or expressing ourselves without fear of being taunted and violently assaulted. And for hundreds of thousands living in less tolerant places all across the country, openness has never been a reality. Until it is, we're nowhere near victory.

We may be seeing solid majorities in national polls supporting anti-discrimination laws for gay and transgender people, and even majorities supporting marriage equality. But the minorities are still substantial. And they are getting more desperate. For years, those who are anti-gay have been emboldened by the often hateful declarations of homophobic religious leaders and by the attacks by groups like the National Organization for Marriage, which have demeaned gays. After decades of struggle, we're finally beating them back in the courts, in legislatures and even at the ballot box. And perhaps the frustration and anger by those who oppose us is now further empowering the thugs who take their hate and rage to the streets.

It shouldn't come as a surprise then that in New York City, in a state that passed marriage equality in 2011, hate crimes against LGBT people so far in 2013 are almost double what were at this point in 2012. And 2012 itself was a notable year nationally, with outbreak of anti-LGBT violence in some of the country's most gay-friendly cities, like New York, Washington, Los Angeles, Dallas and Atlanta. 2011 saw the highest number of anti-LGBT murders ever reported, with transgender people the hardest-hit victims. At least 13 transgender Americans were reported to have been murdered in 2012 alone.

We sometimes forget that getting laws passed and getting court rulings declared is, comparatively, the easy part -- as monumentally difficult as that has been and continues to be. One reason we in fact get the laws passed, in addition to protecting ourselves, is to change attitudes for future generations. But that part doesn't happen overnight and surely not without a backlash, which can sometimes be violent, as it has been in just about every other movement for equality. The hate is still out there and the haters are getting more desperate. Our worst enemies right now are complacency and the seductive message that we've "arrived."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michel...b_3303860.html
__________________


All generalizations are dangerous.
Vis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 07:46 PM   #7
Bayz101
Renegade
Supporter
 
Bayz101's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mansfield, Ohio
Posts: 7,693
Gender: Male
Member Number: 18856
Thanks: 1,237
Thanked 3,505 Times in 1,580 Posts
My Mood: Tired
Default Re: Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

It's terrible. Influential actions won't change any of this, though. These people need to be locked up. This is one of the many sickening things that take place in our everyday lives. You'd be surprised how many times a day I hear words like "retard" and "faggot" being tossed around in regular conversation. That's minor compared to whats happening in the stories you've posted, obviously, but it's bad none the less, and it won't just "stop".
__________________


"Either you're playing dumb, or it's not an act". -Judge Judy

No need to drive me crazy. I can walk from here.
Bayz101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 07:54 PM   #8
Vis
In Hoc
Supporter
 
Vis's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 7,251
Gender: Male
Member Number: 5117
Thanks: 538
Thanked 4,159 Times in 2,140 Posts
My Mood: Innocent
Default Re: Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayz101 View Post
It's terrible. Influential actions won't change any of this, though. These people need to be locked up. This is one of the many sickening things that take place in our everyday lives. You'd be surprised how many times a day I hear words like "retard" and "faggot" being tossed around in regular conversation. That's minor compared to whats happening in the stories you've posted, obviously, but it's bad none the less, and it won't just "stop".
You can't lock them up until after someone is hurt. To prevent the hurt you have to stop the impulse to victimize. You have to change the attitudes.

My 16 year old is in a mixed relationship. I live in the old south and no one is his group of friends or hers gave it a second thought. They're just a high school couple. That's how attitudes can change. I'm not at all confident that he won't ever hear comments for being with her but it isn't pervasive.
__________________


All generalizations are dangerous.
Vis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 08:04 PM   #9
Bayz101
Renegade
Supporter
 
Bayz101's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mansfield, Ohio
Posts: 7,693
Gender: Male
Member Number: 18856
Thanks: 1,237
Thanked 3,505 Times in 1,580 Posts
My Mood: Tired
Default Re: Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vis View Post
You can't lock them up until after someone is hurt. To prevent the hurt you have to stop the impulse to victimize. You have to change the attitudes.

My 16 year old is in a mixed relationship. I live in the old south and no one is his group of friends or hers gave it a second thought. They're just a high school couple. That's how attitudes can change. I'm not at all confident that he won't ever hear comments for being with her but it isn't pervasive.
I understand this, but it's not something that'll stop altogether. America hasn't been racially segregated for a long time now, and there's still hate crimes every day. I understand what you're saying, but stories like these will always be published. It's sad. Even worse, it's sickening. The notion that it's cool to attack someone because they seem different from yourself is something that needs to stop, and I believe that's something that will have been stopped by the majority, but there'll always be hate crimes.

There'll always be some people fucked up enough in the head to do these awful things, and more articles like this will be published. As I said, it's sad, but true.

I remember being told a story of a young gay man being nailed to a fence alongside a country road. This man was found with a single tear below his right eye. Dead. At the age of 9 I was told this story, and since then I've realized that there will always be bad people. I'm just glad it's not all like that, and a lot of the world is filled with good people with good hearts.
__________________


"Either you're playing dumb, or it's not an act". -Judge Judy

No need to drive me crazy. I can walk from here.
Bayz101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 08:19 PM   #10
Vis
In Hoc
Supporter
 
Vis's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 7,251
Gender: Male
Member Number: 5117
Thanks: 538
Thanked 4,159 Times in 2,140 Posts
My Mood: Innocent
Default Re: Leonard Pitts: Why Mark Carson's story still matters.

The fewer people who have hate, the fewer acts of violence.
__________________


All generalizations are dangerous.
Vis is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Shoutbox provided by vBShout v6.2.1 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.0.8 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.
Navbar with Avatar by Motorradforum
no new posts